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mdl

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mdl last won the day on February 21 2014

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About mdl

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    Golfaholic

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    Portland, OR

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    8.3
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    Righty

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  1. I'm just bitter that our lives are going to suck for SO much longer than people who live in pretty much every other rich country in the world because we have the worst leadership in the world.
  2. I don't have a wsj subscription, do didn't read the op-ed. But I read the paper. The lethal force finding is essentially meaningless. Aside from all the caveats they give about potentially (and given it's police data, likely) very large unknown biases in the data, the estimate is a 25% decrease in likelihood for African Americans but that estimate is not statistically significant. 25% is an enormous practical difference. If they couldn't detect an effect that large as statistically significant, really all that means is their study didn't have the power to identify an effect. They're reporting noise and pretending it means something.
  3. As my best black friend would say, not all skinfolk are kinfolk. And (as a person with a PhD in statistics I feel highly qualified to say), the data argument is hogwash and deeply uninformed. The argument from ignorant academics (yes, much of academia is statistically illiterate) is that controlling for levels of police violence by taking into account arrests and convictions will make it look like high levels of police violence against PoC are justified, or at least no worse than experienced by white people. More black people are criminals, so of course they interact with and are shot by police at higher levels. Except criminal records in America aren't a measure of how often people commit crimes we want to sanction as a society. They are, in aggregate, mostly a measure of how much police target people in different groups*. If the police target PoC, then PoC will have more extensive criminal records on average and will interact with police more often. So it's a circular argument. *It's very hard to measure/prove that, but there has been some work in that vein. For instance, basic facts like the proportion of white and black teens who smoke pot is similar, but the proportion of black and white teens who've been arrested for pot is nowhere close to the same.
  4. This is willful ignorance. My ancestors were Poles who came to work the coal mines and Jews running from pogroms. They never owned slaves. They came with nothing. That is entirely beside the point When you were 12, did your dad take you to a parking lot and practice how not to get killed sitting in each seat while he walked up like a cop? When you were 8 did your uncle sit you down and tell you never to leave a store without a receipt or you might get killed by police? Is your parents' house worth half what it would be if their neighborhood didn't have lots of people who look like you? Have you had your resume tossed aside over and over in favor of less qualified people because of your name (too black)? Do you have friends in jail because they smoked pot in high school? Have you been offered less money than less qualified colleagues at every job because of how you look? Have you been passed over for promotions for less qualified colleagues because of how you look? Has that and (much) worse been happening to your family for generations? Yeah I didn't think so.
  5. I think the point is white people should think about why they might read that article and read shame. That word is never used. The article explicitly calls out the uselessness of wallowing and performative guilt. The call is to feel miserable. Not vaguely bad. But the same as you would if society started treating people with your last name like black people are currently treated. The kind of feeling that would drive you to action. 1000%. I've been arguing for taking cops' guns away forever. Also, the bar for criminally charging cops for murder or assault should be the same as for everyone else. As in, if a cop hits someone with a baton, smart money is they're doing 10 years for assault with a deadly weapon, same as everyone else.
  6. Best argument I've seen is the fact that the vast majority of emergency calls are for things that don't need armed response. So sure, you keep detectives, but if 90% of emergency requests are better handled by medical, mental health, and social services, then you can reduce beat cops by 90%.
  7. White People Should Be Feeling Miserable - The Atlantic I want white people to stop killing us. I also want white people to stop...
  8. I disagree, but don't deny folks here aren't ready to acknowledge that this is the same topic. How racist policing took over American cities, explained by a historian "The problem is the way policing was built," historian Khalil Muhammad says.
  9. I partially agree. For white folks, sure, this is a time to self reflect. To stop blocking out most of our history. And what we have gained and continue to gain from it. But politics isn't shipping things off. I'd much rather folks say the n-word 100x a day but vote into city council reps who eliminate the police and totally reimagine public service and public safety, rather than preen about their social justice beliefs while voting for folks who will keep poor and brown folks oppressed and out of their neighborhoods. To quote Erik, you're responding to something I didn't say. The vast majority of emergency response is medical, or nuisance complaints about homeless or minorities, or other things for which armed response is a ridiculous one. No one ever said we don't need an armed emergency response force for a modern society. I'm saying that the "emergency response" we have currently is for repressing people, not protecting rights or society.
  10. I love you Erik. I've been a dedicated member here for a decade. But you're factually wrong. The modern American police force evolved from elites organizing forces to crush the working class and to keep down the slaves The History Of Policing In The United States, Part 1 | Police Studies Online | Eastern Kentucky University Learn about the history and development of policing and law enforcement in the United States. Policing is a political act by elites to maintain their wealth and power and repress those who might threaten it. Of course there are interlinking social tides, but it's simply false to pretend this is anything but a political issue.
  11. mdl

    My Swing (mdl)

    Some attempts to keep some of the plane stuff I was working on while not forgetting to move my lower body.
  12. mdl

    My Swing (mdl)

    Because my hips are open like 0-5°? 😬
  13. mdl

    My Swing (mdl)

    I've been Playing Golf for: 13 years My current handicap index or average score is: 9 My typical ball flight is: straight or fade The shot I hate or the "miss" I'm trying to reduce/eliminate is: spray It's been so long since I've worked on my swing, my old swing thread doesn't exist! Taking advantage of the pandemic, got a net. The thing I'm working on in these videos is getting flatter at A5. Videos:
  14. mdl

    My Swing (iacas)

    Have you gone away from not trying to be steep at A5?
  15. WTF. Websites that can be kept up from home (if you don't always work from home) have to be shut down? That doesn't make any f***ing sense.
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