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MiniMoe

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About MiniMoe

  • Rank
    Dead straight is not an accident!
  • Birthday 11/30/1972

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    4.0
  • Handedness
    Righty

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  1. Did this happen in a tournament or a practice round? If a tournament... where did he find his caddy, cause he's an idiot. On top of that.... why did he even putt the ball with his caddy standing in front of the hole? Something sounds a little fishy.
  2. My goal is not to play different for any shot. I don't care if it's for 69, 59, or 89. I want to play the same for every shot. Pressure to make a putt is not real... unless it is for real money (make it or lose $100). For the most part, pressure is self imposed. Why is a 4 footer for 65 harder than a 4 footer for 85? It's not..... it's the same damn putt. What it's for is irrelevant to the shot that has to be made. So, I strive to make every shot matter just the same.
  3. MiniMoe

    HDCP Question

    think of it this way.... I'm a plus handicap, I'm not going to lie. Say I am having an average day and am -1 with 2 to play. Would it be fair to the rest of the handicap players if I took a 12 on the last two par 4 holes to shoot in the upper 80's? I don't think so. I I could, I might be tempted to play hard for skins for the first 15 holes and finish really bad and be able to keep a 12 hcp. You have to have a cap per hole based on potential to help keep handicaps lower. After all, a handicap is supposed to be based on potential... not average scores. The problem is that many clubs don't go through the cards and account for the 12 some good players get, so handicaps are too high. I have thought about it and have done some mock trials. I think if you beat your handicap by more than 4, that scores goes in three times, If you beat your handicap by less than 4, it only goes in twice. Also, you can not shoot more than 4 above your handicap (it's a cap). This modified system penalized for blowing your handicap by too much, but at the same time limits your ability to quickly raise your handicap.
  4. If you are not playing for score, there is no such thing as cheating. And...... if you are not playing against me... I don't care what the hell you do. But, be aware, if I know you cheat and you play against me, I will watch you like a hawk and call you on every penalty... even for $1. I will not put up with it for any amount of money.
  5. I did an experiment years ago when I played. For six months I did not use the words birdie, par, or bogey. I only talked about a number. I found that my overall scores were lower for that time than when I talked about making a birdie, or needing a birdie, or whatever. Then I noticed when I played USGA tournaments there was a hole number and a box. What par the hole was did not matter. I also realized that when I just went by the numbers I did not know where I stood for the round. I had some of my best rounds when I did not know where I was relative to par. I blew some great rounds when after 14 I knew I was 9 under and had a chance for the course record or to break 60. There are some tour players today that do not look at leader boards... even when they think they are leading. The guys that are leader board lookers are more worried about choking the lead away than they are actually winning.
  6. I have not always been a good player, but I have always had the competitive drive. I love the feeling of being one down with three to play and fighting like hell to win the match. The only thing better is being one up on the last hole and it being a hard hole. I am not scared of needing to make the 10 footer to tie or win the match. That being said, I don't play any different if I am 1 down or 1 up. I know my game and don't try to do things that are too risky. I learned years ago that playing the odds are the best way to shoot your best scores. Another thing is that I don't play different if the bet is $10 or $500. All I can do is the best I can do. How much money is on the line is not relevant to how hard I play... I always play as hard as I can..... and I win or lose accordingly... and I don't bitch about it.
  7. Lets say that it cost around $150,000 per year to travel and play the PGA Tour. If you stay on the top 125 you are making close to a million per year on winnings. That is a pretty good return on investment. On top of that, you might have a few sponsors paying you to play their clubs, or wear their clothes, or drive their car. If you stay on the top 125 for more than 5 years, I don't think you have a problem spending $150K to make almost a cool MIL.
  8. from my personal experience if you can't go out on your home course and shoot in the mid to low 60's every single time you play, you have vary little change of contending on a mini-tour. If you don't thing this is right, go out to a different course that plays close to 7,000 yards and play the tips. If you can't shoot at least 2-4 under almost every time, you are not ready for the mini-tours. I say this because if you pick a random course, the pins are gong to pretty easy... for the most part. When you hit the mini-tours, the pins are almost all hard. They are tucked near the edge of a ridge, or right over a bunker, or whatever, but they are not easy by any stretch of the imagination. So, if you can't go out when the pins are easy and shoot under par, what is going to happen when the pins get hard? Test your game. Lay back and have 195 to every par 4 and make it so you have to lay up on every par 5. See how well you shoot. Granted, on the mini's not every shot to a par 4 is going to be 195, but you will have your share. If you can't shoot under par making the game as hard as you can, you are not quite ready for the mini's. I feel your pain.... I'm real close to being ready for the mini's, but I don't have the money to take off work to practice to see how good I can be.....and I do shoot under par far more often than I shoot over par. Don't mean to sound negative, but it takes more than most can even imagine to make it on the mini's. I hope something clicks and it comes together and you make it. Good luck and practice hard. Oh, and it will cost at least $60,000 to play a season on a mini-tour... probably more. I talked with a friend that was on the Adams Tour and he mentioned his sponsors spent almost $100,000 on him last year.
  9. In tournament play there is a local rule requiring the player to play one brand of ball throughout the round. (you can change brands from one round to the next, but not in the same round) If that rule is not in place, a player can change ball between holes, but is not allowed under the rules to change ball during the play of a hole. So, you can not change from a top-flight to a pro v-1 when you get to the putting green, but you can change from a top-flight that you played on hole 1 to a pro v-1 you want to play on hole 2. If you lose a ball in the water, you have to finish the hole with the brand you started with.. on that hole. And you can not use a separate "putting" ball on a hole. You have to use the exact same ball you started the hole with... unless you lose it. If you change, there is a 1 shot penalty.
  10. As a "Moe" swinger, I like my stance a little wider. I have learned that if my stance is too narrow, my hips spin too much. However, If my stance becomes too wide, I tend to push the ball as my body is "in the way" of my swing. There is a balance. I like my stance to be just wider than shoulder width with my driver... then it get more narrow as the clubs get shorter. Also understand that a golf swing and personal feel does change over time. Some weeks I hit the ball better with a wider stance than normal, and some weeks I hit the ball better with a more narrow stance than normal. The biggest key is to let the swing flow and be willing to change and try something a little different when it's needed. There is an ideological flaw in the thought that everything has to be the same in the set up to be a consistent ball striker. I don't believe that at all. The swing is a combination of correct fundamentals and feel. You have to learn how to adjust when things are not quite right, and not think you are "fixing" a swing flaw, because in a few days or weeks you might need to make another little adjustment that helps produce the desired ball flight and control. You are not "fixing" your swing, you are just going with the flow.
  11. it took me years to get the hook out of my game. I can draw the ball when I really need to, but it is my last resort. I love being able to aim O.B. left and know it's coming back into play. There are a few courses that are a little more difficult to play, but with good course management and club selection, not hitting a draw does not hurt me that much.
  12. this is supposed to be a gentleman's game. I'm not going to follow you around and give yardages, but I have no problem giving you a distance if I'm right there. I'd call douche bag if I asked and you responded with "I don't think so". You can be competitive and want to win without having to be an a-hole. Besides, aren't you playing with friends? Why wouldn't you help a friend in need?
  13. don't change your posture.... ever. The best golfers have found a way to address the ball in a very natural way.... almost like they just walk up and hit it. That is what you do. You can not go wrong from your starting position. If someone tells you to change, tell them to fark off. Also, I noticed you are on plane very nicely. If you have directional problems, only slight adjustments are going to fix things. You don't need to make big changes. Very nice swing. If you can't control the ball, you have to learn where the club is and where the hands are. Don't change things, just get a good understanding of your swing to learn how to control the ball in both distance and direction. It just takes correct practice. I'll take that swing... if you don't want it.. just send it right over.
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