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LeanMachine

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  • Content count

    12
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About LeanMachine

  • Rank
    Also @par-fait6, Banned 2015-06-23

Personal Information

  • Your Location
    North Brunswick, NJ

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    14.3
  • Handedness
    Lefty
  1. When I am swinging irons, especially short irons, I imagine the club head traveling on a totally vertical plane. In reality (when I see myself on video) it is not even close to fully vertical, but I think that is just because of wrist hinge. The club head path between 9oclock and 3oclock is totally vertical, and the club head travels in a straight line that goes through the ball and the target. I know a lot of people will think that is wrong, that the takeaway should be more of an ellipse path than straight back, but this is what works for me. Straight back, wrist hinge, no wrist rotation, then just pull it through towards the target - works every time. Lol well not EVERY time, but I am way more consistent with every club thinking about my swing like this. Anyone else doing this?
  2. WOW, nothing but trolls here. I was hoping to talk to other plays using the moe norman grip, not a bunch of closed minded wrist flippy pricks. You guys can peddle your 5 keys bs while I learn how to win. Bye bye bitches.
  3. @iacas - What is that supposed to prove? Wasn't moe like 20 years old when he played in the masters? He wasn't the best ball striker alive when he was at that age. By your logic it would be a good idea to study Tiger Woods swing from when he was in college. Lol. Everyone's body changes over time, and so their swing will slightly too. Also, he is using the palmy grip in that video. Look at his trail hand. His swing is really not that different from old Moe. He is just more flexible and athletic here - maybe just a slightly excessive backswing.
  4. I was watching this video: Moe Norman Fundamental Debunked where the guy is saying that Moe Norman put the club head far behind the ball so that he could do an early weight shift in his swing. Last time I played I was really slicing my driver. I had always been setting up with the ball an inch away from the driver face. I use Moe Norman's super strong trail hand grip, but I never understood why he set up with the club head 12 inches behind the ball because in his videos he would just say, "Oh it was just something I've always done since I was younger". Well after I watched this video it made me think maybe the club head moved back does have to do with an early weight shift. So for a round of nine holes I did that. I had my normal setup, ball a little inside front heel, club shaft straight out no forward shaffling. Then I shift what feels like 90% of my weight (well, it feels like that at least) onto my back foot, and I try to move my whole body back arms and everything without moving, only moving my legs. In the position my club head is like 5 or 6 inches behind the ball. Then I try to take a controlled backswing with a little wrist hinge, and then pull the club head down through the ball and right at the target while moving laterally towards the target at impact. It was working for me. I was able to control my drive much more. I like Moe's "less moving parts" theory, and i like it. Is there really any advantage to doing the back weight shift as you do your backswing? And yet, all the tour players do it that way. lol. I know a lot of people with the "rotary swing" philosophy would say that it's a twist and that lateral movement in the worst thing you could possibly do! The lateral movement towards the target definitely adds distance imo. Not only that, but it helps you finish pointing at the target which was another one of Moe's key theories. Anyway, has anyone else tried hitting like this with driver or other clubs?
  5. I don't have a handicap and never have. I am young and never paid usga for it or however it is done. I can at least bogey most holes, sometimes better- unless I hit some kind of hazard. I always play from the far back tee box.
  6. Yeah if you don't believe me let's play.
  7. For sure, Moe was super odd. And yes, sometimes he would say things that didn't really make sense 100% or match up exactly with how he was moving. BUT, he understood very well how to do his swing, and how to make the ball go in the direction he wanted it to go. Somehow I totally understand it. Certain things like when he says "I only think of one straight line through the ball right to the target". When I think about moving the club head in the line the entire time from the takeaway to the follow through, my ball goes straight. When I look at my swing on camera the club head comes back from a little wrist hinge, and on the follow through some momentum eventually carries the club head passed my front shoulder. The point is that you can't take everything he says literally, but use it as a guide to help you find your own similar style swing. The real key is the grip. Once you have a grip that will always leave your club face square you can sort of just do your normal swing, but remember to swing at the target and not across into the trees like every other golfer.
  8. My swing is similar to Mo Norman's, and he inspired me to change everything. Before I had a very "wrist-rotaty" swing, and I felt like I was trying to flip the clubhead through the ball and time it perfectly. About 2 months ago I switched to the "Mo Norman grip" with your back hand under the club holding it in the lifeline. I like it for a few reasons. 1For one, I am able to eliminate all the wrist rotation movement. That was really causing me to spray the ball all over, and even my good shots were a few feet left or right at best. With this grip it's much easier to have the clubface square at impact, hence straight shots for me - not just straighter in general, but way fewer "really bad misses". Another reason I like it is because of how it affects the way your wrists bend. Many vardon grip players have a real scoopy motion at the bottom of the swing. Among other things, this can really increase the chance of hitting thin.With the Mo grip I find it really hard to "over release" the hinge on the downswing so my hand never fall into the bad behind-the-ball position. Another thing that has helped me is swinging "at the target". In Mo's videos he makes fun of other golfers, "When they are swinging where to their clubs end up? Around their backs. I want the ball to go to the target,I swing at the target. They swing around the golf course. Their club swing points right into the trees. So where does their ball go? Rightinto the trees!" When my follow through is finished I try to have my chest hands and clubhead all in a line pointing at the target, and well, a whole lot of the time it goes to the target! I do feel like sometimes on my driver I come through on an out-to-in path that puts sort of an unwanted fade on the ball, but it's nowhere near as bad as when I wasn't using this grip.
  9. My swing is similar to Mo Norman's, and he inspired me to change everything. Before I had a very "wrist-rotaty" swing, and I felt like I was trying to flip the clubhead through the ball and time it perfectly. About 2 months ago I switched to the "Mo Norman grip" with your back hand under the club holding it in the lifeline. I like it for a few reasons. 1For one, I am able to eliminate all the wrist rotation movement. That was really causing me to spray the ball all over, and even my good shots were a few feet left or right at best. With this grip it's much easier to have the clubface square at impact, hence straight shots for me - not just straighter in general, but way fewer "really bad misses". Another reason I like it is because of how it affects the way your wrists bend. Many vardon grip players have a real scoopy motion at the bottom of the swing. Among other things, this can really increase the chance of hitting thin.With the Mo grip I find it really hard to "over release" the hinge on the downswing so my hand never fall into the bad behind-the-ball position. Another thing that has helped me is swinging "at the target". In Mo's videos he makes fun of other golfers, "When they are swinging where to their clubs end up? Around their backs. I want the ball to go to the target,I swing at the target. They swing around the golf course. Their club swing points right into the trees. So where does their ball go? Rightinto the trees!" When my follow through is finished I try to have my chest hands and clubhead all in a line pointing at the target, and well, a whole lot of the time it goes to the target! I do feel like sometimes on my driver I come through on an out-to-in path that puts sort of an unwanted fade on the ball, but it's nowhere near as bad as when I wasn't using this grip.
  10. My swing is similar to Mo Norman's, and he inspired me to change everything. Before I had a very "wrist-rotaty" swing, and I felt like I was trying to flip the clubhead through the ball and time it perfectly. I think having your arms super straight and rigid at address is not the point, and not really what Mo did. The point is to address the ball in pretty much the same arm position as impact so that it's just a back and through motion. About 2 months ago I switched to the "Mo Norman grip" with your back hand under the club holding it in the lifeline. I like it for a few reasons. 1For one, I am able to eliminate all the wrist rotation movement. That was really causing me to spray the ball all over, and even my good shots were a few feet left or right at best. With this grip it's much easier to have the clubface square at impact, hence straight shots for me - not just straighter in general, but way fewer "really bad misses". Another reason I like it is because of how it affects the way your wrists bend. Many vardon grip players have a real scoopy motion at the bottom of the swing. Among other things, this can really increase the chance of hitting thin.With the Mo grip I find it really hard to "over release" the hinge on the downswing so my hand never fall into the bad behind-the-ball position. Another thing that has helped me is swinging "at the target". In Mo's videos he makes fun of other golfers, "When they are swinging where to their clubs end up? Around their backs. I want the ball to go to the target,I swing at the target. They swing around the golf course. Their club swing points right into the trees. So where does their ball go? Rightinto the trees!" When my follow through is finished I try to have my chest hands and clubhead all in a line pointing at the target, and well, a whole lot of the time it goes to the target! I do feel like sometimes on my driver I come through on an out-to-in path that puts sort of an unwanted fade on the ball, but it's nowhere near as bad as when I wasn't using this grip.
  11. My swing is similar to Mo Norman's, and he inspired me to change everything. Before I had a very "wrist-rotaty" swing, and I felt like I was trying to flip the clubhead through the ball and time it perfectly. About 2 months ago I switched to the "Mo Norman grip" with your back hand under the club holding it in the lifeline. I like it for a few reasons. 1For one, I am able to eliminate all the wrist rotation movement. That was really causing me to spray the ball all over, and even my good shots were a few feet left or right at best. With this grip it's much easier to have the clubface square at impact, hence straight shots for me - not just straighter in general, but way fewer "really bad misses". Another reason I like it is because of how it affects the way your wrists bend. Many vardon grip players have a real scoopy motion at the bottom of the swing. Among other things, this can really increase the chance of hitting thin.With the Mo grip I find it really hard to "over release" the hinge on the downswing so my hand never fall into the bad behind-the-ball position. Another thing that has helped me is swinging "at the target". In Mo's videos he makes fun of other golfers, "When they are swinging where to their clubs end up? Around their backs. I want the ball to go to the target,I swing at the target. They swing around the golf course. Their club swing points right into the trees. So where does their ball go? Rightinto the trees!" When my follow through is finished I try to have my chest hands and clubhead all in a line pointing at the target, and well, a whole lot of the time it goes to the target! I do feel like sometimes on my driver I come through on an out-to-in path that puts sort of an unwanted fade on the ball, but it's nowhere near as bad as when I wasn't using this grip.
  12. Hi, I'm Jim. I live in North Brunswick and play around there. I usually go to Tara Greens or the Rutgers course. I graduated from Rutgers 2 years ago. My dad bought me my first set of clubs when I was young, around 13. I had always been into other sports during school - tennis, baseball, snowboarding, soccer... so I was never a serious player while in school. Recently, my other friends have gotten really into golf, and so have it. I switch to a "Moe Norman grip" recently, and it's been helping me a lot to straighten out my shots. I've gotten better at putting and chipping too. Just working on not slicing my driver and then I'll be trying to get my true handicap. I like to play any course around nj, but the cheaper the better. Lol.