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      Visit FlagstickRule.com   03/13/2017

      Visit the site flagstickrule.com to read about and sign a petition for the USGA/R&A regarding the one terrible rule in the proposed "modernized" rules for 2019.
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SG11118

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About SG11118

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  • Birthday April 3

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    Northern Minnesota

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  1. I guess Tiger needs a new phone number now
  2. Could be a score from a guy that tried to play through an injury. Could be a score from a pro who isn't very good.
  3. Agree - Probably can't govern what goes in the book. They could still make it illegal to utilize green slope information in the book to aid in making a putting stroke though. It would be a bit of a tell if the player and / or caddy are looking at the book while their ball is sitting on the green.
  4. It seems like the USGA / R&A can only eliminate the use of these books during the round. If I was a touring pro playing the same 30 courses every year for millions of dollars, I'd still figure out a way to get a hold of the laser scan data for all these greens to use in my preparation for the tournament and in my practice rounds. I'd also tell my caddy to memorize what he could. If can't use them during the actual tournament, at least can memorize the general slope of the green to aid in reading of the green.
  5. I find it strange that the USGA and R&A made this announcement to give people warning that they are reviewing the topic and might make another announcement that actually affects the rules in a few months. At the PGA level, Pros and their caddies will probably still create and reference these books in preparing for a tournament. They'll probably just have to do a little more memorizing and preparing before the event and between rounds if they can't carry the books along with them on the course.
  6. Maybe you tentatively sign at the end of each 18 hole round, but that signature doesn't become "official" until the golfer has also signed for the tournament score?
  7. There is a bit of a disconnect that you need to sign your card after each 18 hole round, but they can assess penalties over the entire 72 hole tournament. Why not change the rules to let the golfer officially sign for all four 18 hole rounds at the end of the 72 hole tournament?
  8. A 7 iron in the 70s probably has the same loft on it as an 8 often does now (or 9 on some brands). I'm sure the technology has improved distances 5-10%, but it doesn't seem accurate to give it 100% credit for going from 150 to 200.
  9. It was probably more perception than reality. A lot of times the ball didn't seem to be rolling very hard, and it would hit the pin and run 8 feet away. Your high side / low side example was one I wasn't thinking of. I was thinking that what might be happening is the ball is rolling across the ground, hits the flag where it was tapered enough to transfer some of the horizontal energy into vertical energy to have the ball bounce across the green where it is subject to a smaller amount of friction and then have the potential to travel further than if the ball had continued to roll. Its maybe possible, but a little far fetched, and probably only applicable on very slow greens. You guys are probably right that it really isn't happening.
  10. My home course previously had fairly large diameter stiff metal pins that tapered to a smaller diameter at the flag. They were not very accepting of golf balls. Usually when your ball hit these pins, you ended up outside of easy one-putt range. I'm not going to definitively say the pins caused the ball to deflect this far, but perhaps some combination of the hole adding energy to the ball and the stiff pin deflecting most of that energy might have resulted in the ball ending up further away than had the pin not been there? We went to skinnier fiberglass pins at the end of last year that were definitely less stiff and more able to absorb rather than deflect energy.
  11. There are many different flagstick designs in use. Different designs definitely behave differently. Pretty difficult to make universal proclamations on their behavior without analyzing the various designs.
  12. I do like that a golfer can take practice swings near their ball (without touching it) without fear of penalty. I do like that a golfer can address the ball on the green and lightly ground their club near the ball (without touching it) without fear of penalty. I do agree with others that we are going to see this local rule do more to complicate the rules than simplify them. I'd be willing to wager we'll see some issues with the rule this year, and it will be written differently when it is incorporated into the rules during the next revision.
  13. Not a fan of no penalty for accidently kicking your ball. Not a fan of no penalty for accidently hitting the ball with your putter on a practice swing.
  14. I think #1 is difficult to fairly enforce from golfer to golfer the way it is written, but wouldn't necessarily call it totally stupid. Not sure what is meant with #4? I think balls should be dropped as the rules currently mandate it. If there was an easy way to choose a uniform distance for "clublength" when used in measuring the drop area, I'd likely be for it as a change. However probably not worth complicating the rules over, so not stupid. #7 is at least kind of stupid. I don't believe the rules say anything about needing a watch to play golf. Is a person supposed to manually count off time as they look if they don't have a watch? I have never once seen a golfer look at their watch or start a timer when they start to look for a ball. Golfers generally are optimistic they'll find a ball, so why should they even worry about starting the clock on their search? Should the rules mandate that everyone carries a watch and starts the clock as soon as they get to the point where they think their ball should be? Five minutes is a long time. Should it be less? There are times when a ball is difficult to find in the fairway or light rough - particularly when there are leaves. When a person keeps their ball in play, I have some problem with the rules being tough on the golfer just because their ball may have landed someplace out of the norm where it isn't as easy to see. I wouldn't have a problem with a person taking 5 minutes one time in their round, but when the same person takes 5 minutes multiple times in their round, it really isn't fair to the rest of the course. I guess if I was changing the rule, I'd make it clear how the timing is meant to happen, and give each golfer one time per round to take between 2.5 and 5 minutes. After that the limit is 2.5 minutes per search. I have no problems with 2, 3, 5, 6, and 8. I'll say 1 and 7 each get a partial stupid score.
  15. What word in the English language refers to a magnitude where it is visible to the naked eye, but may require focusing on small objects to do so? There probably is a word for this magnitude of size, and that was always what was intended in my proposal and explanations. Any time I used the word small, micro or microscopic was only meant to imply that people needed to look at a smaller scale at the object than they normally would. After people started getting hung up on "micro", I switched to "blade of grass" level. I was willing to let 18-2 and D18/2-0.5 remain as is for situations where the ball was not lifted or dropped beforehand. It seems like Mr. Davis doesn't might not even want to do that.