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Blackjack Don

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About Blackjack Don

  • Rank
    Perpetual Victim

Personal Information

  • Your Location
    Las Vegas, NV

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    20+
  • Handedness
    Righty

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3,173 profile views
  1. Is golf more mental or physical?

    How often did Michael Jordan think about cheeseburgers, Las Vegas, or sex during a game? How often did he think about these driving around town? Every star has the physical talent. Only those with superior focus--without the mind wandering--those are the superstars. How often do you drive across town and wonder whether that last light was red or green? Because the course isn't the practice area. The ball doesn't know this. Sobering advice.
  2. Is golf more mental or physical?

    The law of average says at some point we have to agree on something. Well, I agree with you, if we assume that someone can hit a golf ball the same way every single time. They said Ben Hogan had a problem with tournaments. For the final three rounds he had to hit out of his divots from the first round. lol I don't believe I'll get there, do you? If so, then it would be physical, all the way. Best wishes, from across the chasm.
  3. Is golf more mental or physical?

    Before I read everyone else's comments, my dos centavos. I am a practicing Buddhist meditator. I spent almost a year in a monastery, in robes. I have spent a lot of time focusing my mind, training it, observing it, trying to understand it. I don't know many golfing monks, so I have a unique perspective. I have some bonafides. My first reaction to this interesting question was it's impossible to know. The swing, the pitch, the putt, happen too fast for the mind to follow. You may tell your left wrist to pronate, but you can't know it as the club connects. So it's physical. But. I'm finding my biggest problem to be my own personal demon--attention deficit disorder. I am practiced at practicing concentration. If I could concentrate for longer periods, my meditation practice would be far, far stronger. I have that limitation. I know it well. I had ADD long before there was an acronym. Concentration is the reason some are super-stars, and some never fulfill their potential. Nicklaus, Woods, Ruth, Bird all had the best concentration of all time in their sports. Brady's intensity is off the charts. I am unable to concentrate through an entire shot sequence, from forming a mental picture of the shot, to practice swings to get the feel, to grip/setup/alignment/aiming, to finishing high. On the course. Shot after shot. Ninety times in four hours. For someone who has senior-level ADD, fahgeddaboudit. It ain't going to happen. So, I guess. Mental.
  4. Hurricane IRMA

    August 13, a Friday. It was bad on Cape Coral that day. I lost my house and sailboat. You don't want to be anywhere near where a cat 4 hits. You want to be on another continent with a cat 5.
  5. Add two OB and you've got my game. My best was 295 yards. I'm usually out about 240, depending on the curve.
  6. My Swing (Blackjack Don)

    This is the pic I was looking at for spine angle. Went to the range today and worked on hip turn, exclusively. Did a couple of drills--ball under my right foot and feet together--did two practice and one regular. Then worked on the hip turn. Best consistent practice I've ever had. Great dispersion. This might work.
  7. My Swing (Blackjack Don)

    A tip for anyone who is doing videos of themselves. Don't look for the perfect swing out of all those swings. Looks for differences in four or five. The worst swings teach me more than the good ones. The sway is there. In more of the bad ones than the good ones. Thanks for the static picture. I can see the spine angle isn't too bad, so I got that going for me. I've practiced enough now where I can break down the swing into components to work on, and can work on them as long as my ADD allows. lol At sixty-two, while I practice yoga stretches every day, I don't know how much more the old joints and tendons are going to allow me to turn. Work in progress. Thanks, ever so much again, Erik.
  8. My Swing (Blackjack Don)

    Thanks. Lotta hard work, but worth it. Those little draws are beautiful. Appreciate the support.
  9. My Swing (Blackjack Don)

    Thanks again. Many thanks, actually. I have spent a lot of time since your instruction looking at videos, as well as my own. Yep, there's swaying there. A question, if you please? Does the forward weight shift happen automatically with the hip turn, or is it because the weight at setup is forward and that doesn't change?
  10. My Swing (Blackjack Don)

    I'm still doing that, huh? Damn, that's hard. Thanks, man.
  11. My Swing (Blackjack Don)

    It's been awhile since I posted a swing video. I've been working at it all summer. I'm okay with where I'm at now. Open to comments and suggestions. Thanks, Don
  12. Range-->Course

    You can hit three balls in a row. It doesn't matter where it goes. You have to pitch, chip, and putt. Before the next shot. Every stroke counts. That's why it's range golf, not course golf. That's not even counting what's going on in that four inches in back of the eyes. And the eyes lie.
  13. Close to giving up the game!

    Take one breath, focus on the breath, and putt at the end of breathing out. That's as relaxed as you are ever going to be. Aim for the ball to stop six inches past the cup, six not twelve or 18. As Harvey Penick said, Take dead aim. And keep the putter as low as you can on the follow-thru with long putts. I look at the cup not the ball from four feet, but that takes some getting used to doing. Nearly hole every short putt and fifty fifty from eight to ten. The biggest is the breath. I do this on every good stroke, and half of the bad ones.
  14. At what point do I realize I'm not good at this game?

    Amazing comments in this thread. Most golfers will never hear any of this because their golf is strictly on Saturdays with the boys. They don't worry about sucking. That's left for us who have a hundred clicks in their Golf Favorites folder. First, our expectations are always out of whack. We somehow think we can be better than this. Even most of us here don't realize all the moving parts, and getting to the point of forgetting all of them. And what about the mental parts? I'm on top of the mental side--years of meditation practice helps--yet I find it hard to concentrate on the golf moment at a high level. I'm also over sixty. So if I could produce the clubhead speed, on a single swing plane, it's not likely I could concentrate for 18 holes. Believe me, I'm aware of how bad my mind can get at times putting, chipping, pitching, driving. And how much time I need to put into practice. Hundreds of hours over the last year to get to this point. Don't forget to include the yoga practice for flexibility. Still, I'm playing on a rickety frame, not to mention shaky balance issues. I'm not good. Just how good can I possibly be? Good enough to hit that one shot that makes me want to come back and do it again. Since par is out of question, I'm happy to say it's enough to once in a while hit a shot that Jason, Jordan, DJ, even Hidecki in Japanese, would say was as good as they could do. Keeps me coming back, which is really the whole point. You'll stay with it. If you could have quit, you would have already.
  15. Will the Flagstick Rule Make the Cut?

    Ah, yes, agree with that. However, given the laziness inherent in all of us, give it time. In time, leaving it in will be normalized. In time, you might be hearing "You can take it out?" more often than "Leave it in or out?" on the apron. I see hitting the flag at anything other than pretty dead on is a random event. As a poker player, I accept random events over which no one can gain an advantage. Everyone has the same luck. I believe thinking leaving the pin in gives an advantage is engaging in too much belief in the power of dumb luck. It's like a superstition more than a fact. Anyone who can use the pin to their advantage probably hits better approaches than I do, too. But it's not like a bank shot-level skill. I could care less about the flag in the hole. I'm aiming at the hole. Does anyone of this make sense? I can understand the traditionalist viewpoint. We are just ready to move on. Best wishes. I find it interesting that the traditionalists seem to vote yes, they think it will stay, not because they approve, but because they feel like a minority. Those who voted no because they think it will not stay but really want it to stay, feel like a minority. Neither side feels they have enough influence to change a result they don't like. So who has the power in golf? Are the traditionalists losing power? Sorry, but I find this fascinating in a Spock sort of way.