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      Visit FlagstickRule.com   03/13/2017

      Visit the site flagstickrule.com to read about and sign a petition for the USGA/R&A regarding the one terrible rule in the proposed "modernized" rules for 2019.

MRR

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27 Plays from the Tips

About MRR

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    Western New York

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  1. Mr. Winter failed to state that "ms. Moon swept back the ball without checking with ms. Shepard first; at that moment the round was over and there was nothing ms. Shepard could have done to concede the putt." Without that concrete statement, I expect that others will still cry foul and claim ms. Shepard was in the wrong.
  2. "Hiding behind a rulebook" involves taking multiple rules together in such a way that the Rules as Written gives a different outcome than "Rules as Intended". I see nothing of that happening here. You and I have very different takes from the story... She made a factual statement that she never said out loud that she conceded the putt. To say otherwise would be lying. She then opined that she would have conceded it. Rather sportsmanlike to me. I have a feeling that, by that point, her coach ran to the rules official to mark it in stone that his player won. Even if that's not the case, the rules are black and white. The actions are not in question; there's no issue on if someone intended to do something or if that "something" happened.
  3. Carts in your yard? Suggestions

    I don't doubt that. But he may have honestly thought he was allowed to hit from someone's yard. You and I know that you cannot, but the friend of a friend who is simply talked into golfing one day may not. Irrespective of that, I still cannot get past the fact that he took a divot out of your yard without apology.
  4. Carts in your yard? Suggestions

    To be fair, he may not have understood that he did anything wrong. You live there. You understand what and where the stakes are. I assume you are a golfer, since you are on this site. He, however, may just be a friend of a golfer who really doesn't know any better. IMO, the best thing you can do is provide better information to these weekend players by putting up stakes (at least on the weekend) so they know they cannot do this.
  5. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    While I think the non-golfers' hearts are in the right place, I always find it odd that people will "stand up" for someone by taking a stance that the other person does not have.
  6. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    Nor do I. But as @iacas pointed out, this in not necessarily about what we see on TV or on the course. It is more likely about the Monday pro/am, banquet, or what the Symetra players are doing. Lady's fashion is much more diverse than mens. Most men consider a pair of chinos and a button down to be casual and fashionable. To the left, it is often fashionable for a young woman to wear $200 pre-ripped jeans. Sometimes we must learn that what is fashionable in general might not be fashionable in a specific environment.
  7. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    I'm not in favor of places, organizations creating new restrictions (no matter how slight that restriction may be). Ridiculous long-standing restrictions, on the other hand, I am inexplicably fine with. But @iacas is correct; these are minor changes and appear to be based on valid complaints and concerns. Hopefully this isn't the start of a trend to keep adding restrictions and requirements.
  8. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    Two different takes on Sponsorship; As @Vinsk points out, player sponsors may actually want less restrictive codes so that their particular brand can be showcased. They have a product and an image to project. I would think that 50 years ago, Ricky's outfits would have been severely frowned upon. The other side is the tournament sponsor. We are looking at (compared to other professional sports) rather stuffy and historically conservative country clubs. Many clubs' patrons like that fact and want it to continue. The big money national/international sponsors likewise would not want to lose customers or potential customers for appearing to condone unwelcome behavior or attire. They have an image to protect. I'm not exactly a big fan of the dress code restrictions, but I do feel that the venue and the main sponsors have the right to require reasonable regulations. If the LPGA is getting enough requests that the powers that be feel that it should be universally applied, so be it.
  9. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    Agreed. To be quite specific; I think that Michelle Wie looks like a professional golfer in her attire.
  10. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    See my post #8. We've also seen coverage over the past year of some blonde model who decided to be a golfer. I don't remember her actually making it into a tournament, though. The difference isn't much, but when the leaders aren't swinging, the cameras seem to be on the attractive players. Again, personal perception.
  11. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    Lower ranked attractive players seem to me to get more camera time than less attractive players of equal or slightly better scores. Let the women wear what they want, and provide coverage based on score instead of skin.
  12. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    It'll stop some growth.
  13. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    It's pretty much the trademark of Shanshan Feng to wear cow pants one day of a tournament. No different than John Daly's allowable unfashionable attire.
  14. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    My fiancee forbids me from agreeing with that post.
  15. LPGA To Enforce more Strict Dress Code

    When I started watching the LPGA, I was surprised by the variety of clothing that was allowed and players chose to wear. It's a far cry from the standard PGA collared shirt, long slacks, contrasting belt. I wonder if this started with a complaining wife or a player whose physique would prohibit some of the more provocative clothing. I have noticed the LPGA cameras favoring the more objectively attractive players. I first noticed that Olafia Kristinsdottir was given quite a bit of camera time at a tournament this year that catered to introducing young girls to the sport. Saturday and Sunday coverage would show footage of her from earlier in the week talking with a group of girls even though she failed to make the cut. Last week, I was watching the LPGA on my computer. Because they do no broadcast commercials that way, the commercial breaks would instead be cuts to other cameras without announcers. Until she finished the 18th, those cameras were on Kristindottir, despite the fact that stronger players were still in the field. If this new rule is an attempt to stop any oversexualization of the sport, I suppose it's a good thing. However, I think it will backfire. I enjoy watching the attractive players. I also enjoy watching the attractive players who receive a disproportionate amount of camera time get trounced by their "less attractive" peers. As to Gal's aforementioned short skits; she still has shorts underneath. She's technically wearing more clothing than is required.