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Moxley

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5 Sandbagger

About Moxley

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    Established Member

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  • Your Location
    Beccles, UK

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    18
  • Handedness
    Righty

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  1. I see a few different ways on how to chip that are very different. While some will have a preferred method for most choice , there is obviously there is a situational side to this, with some shots suited to different situations. The 3 methods I see instructed the most are probably : Chip as you putt (as per mvmac's video) - very shallow AOA, like putting stroke to let the ball hop a short distance before running on. Uses bounce. Leaning forward approach - steeper AOA , hit down on the ball, pop it up in the air. Exposes leading edge. Mickleson hinge and hold. Not sure I can explain this well, but the basics seem to be a forward ball position, wrist break, face kept open after contact. I'm wondering if some of those who understand the dynamics of these approaches better can describe the various pros/cons of each approach. I tend to use the first two approaches , favouring the first method when on fringe or a good lie on 1st cut. Last one I find too unreliable but will occasionally try it if I need to get ball up and down quickly.
  2. I see a few different ways on how to chip that are very different. While some will have a preferred method for most choice , there is obviously there is a situational side to this, with some shots suited to different situations. The 3 methods I see instructed the most are probably : Chip as you putt (as per mvmac's video) - very shallow AOA, like putting stroke to let the ball hop a short distance before running on. Uses bounce. Leaning forward approach - steeper AOA , hit down on the ball, pop it up in the air. Exposes leading edge. Mickleson hinge and hold. Not sure I can explain this well, but the basics seem to be a forward ball position, wrist break, face kept open after contact. I'm wondering if some of those who understand the dynamics of these approaches better can describe the various pros/cons of each approach. I tend to use the first two approaches , favouring the first method when on fringe or a good lie on 1st cut. Last one I find too unreliable but will occasionally try it if I need to get ball up and down quickly.
  3. Natural Born Putter?

    Not a great putter, but better than I was, and I find a lot of putting is knowledge (green reading, and knowing how to plan to avoid 3 putts). My technique lets me down on short puts, which might be the 'born' bit, but I think most of it can be learnt.
  4. I've switched this year from Chrome Soft to Supersoft, which I'll use on days when the course is wet. As others have said, I don't need the spin , and I'd rather a ball that went straighter since I really don't want to be hitting out of soggy rough.
  5. My iron dispersion is poor at the moment , I'm working on some posture and lower body issues that are probably not helping but are still important. This is OK, but not when I'm playing with a group on a round, where I want to hit greens. I don't want to do the band-aid of swinging the iron with my old swing (where everything, especially knees, moves far too much) as it might impair progress. I'm not suffering the same issues with woods/hybrids, which tend go much straighter without too much effort, so It'd be great to use these when I want to hit a green. Unfortunate thing is, I have never found a way to scale them down to partial shots - the usual result in this instance is a duck hook. Any ideas for partial wood/hybrid shots, are they even a good idea?
  6. Greenside bunker question

    This thread helped me . I still tend to overhit bunker shots , but prioritise just getting out at the moment. My dad slightly bladed one the other week out of 1 greenside bunker straight into the other - always hilarious when it's somebody else.
  7. As others have said, you''ll probably be hitting a lot of shots with short irons . with awkward changes to grip,posture, that kind of thing. I'll be surprised if he let's you swing your driver unless your iron game is really competent and you don't have swing flaws. A very good chance it'll make you a better player, but early lessons might not be fun. At least that's been my experience and that of everybody I know who have taken lessons.
  8. Tee box etiquette

    Also, remember to research your shouts to see what is in. "Get in the hole" is now a bit dated and cliche, "Mashed Potatoes" is still a good one though
  9. Tee box etiquette

    Don't stand too close Aged 13 ( I think), I stood behind my friend as he was swinging, hit me square on the head on his follow through with a wood, sharp bit. I hadn't ever seen so much blood in my life , nor most of my family! required a fair few stitches in a&e. I didn't that much after that and lost interest in my teens. Took up golf again recently, now in my 30's. I wasn't ever going to make pro, but I do rue the lost years! Wherever I stand these days, I'm a good few club lengths away!
  10. Howdy, I am due to play a mini tournament next Friday playing a course I haven't played before. I normally play with this group on a familiar course and rely on my history of the course to really help me out ( I play it a lot), and would have like to practise this new course, but I don't think I'll get the chance. Of course, I can use a course plan and also satellite , but other than highlight hazards I don't find they help much. They can't tell you how long the grass is. So, i'm after tips for how people to play a course you haven't played before, what to look for to give you cues. A few of my own : - Look for yardage markers to guage distance - Check stroke index, if hole is a difficult hole but looks easy, proceed with caution. - Don't gamble on landing in rough until you've got a feel for its length/playability - Give extra time to get to the green to assess slope when playing short pitch shots Any other thoughts?
  11. I would recommend getting something to track your stats,I use golfpad but other tools are out there. If you start early, it will really show you your development (and where you are still weak) by the time you improve a bit
  12. Getting your kids to play

    Interesting topic. I got my 14m old started a month or so back with plastic clubs. He instantly picked up that he was meant to hit the balls with the club head :) We're just having the backyard landscaped (fortunate enough to own a big plot without neighbours) so there should be plenty of practice areas for putting, driving and chipping as he grows up, should he take an interest. Good comments above about ensuring that it's fun for them - I'll add to that playing in front of them, which I think can often spark the curiosity.
  13. No problem - if we can all hit it a little further , we should all enjoy the game more. And anything that serves to accentuate the difference between golfers of differing skill levels is also welcome (and I say that as a technically weak golfer).
  14. For me, as a still relatively poor golfer, I have the same issue and it's normally due to hitting a minor slice, as Jack also said. It's easier to call a slice a fade with a 7 iron as it doesn't look as bad and usually lands in play, but it's the difference for me between 120 yds with a 7 and 140 (which would fly very straight and land a few yards left of target).
  15. Ideal Pitching/Layup Distance

    Went out and played the local par 3 with a couple of balls today, and practiced the close pitches today (the tricky ones 10-20 yds away where I'd normally worry about over/under hitting or even blading it) , throwing another ball in the interesting positions. I'd say that having digested the content of the thread, and having worked on those shots (making where I went wrong and why) , that I think getting closer & mastering a wider range of partial shots is the best way for me, as long as I don't risk going into sand/water. Turns out these shots are also really great fun to play too.
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