Jump to content

Xunzi

Member
  • Content count

    24
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

3 Sandbagger

About Xunzi

  • Rank
    Member

Your Golf Game

  • Handedness
    Righty

Recent Profile Visitors

162 profile views
  1. First to drop would be AW. Second to drop would be LW.
  2. I hit the sweet spot about 80% of the time and I have over 20 in handicap. Kidding.
  3. To be clear on the COR I don’t mean energy would be created but rather released, but anyways it’s a bit sci-fi More likely changes to balls and shafts could keep increasing distances.
  4. I'll see if I can find where I saw that. If I understand you correctly, you're saying that advances in forgiveness design has enabled more aggressive lofts? What I don't understand is the inherent value in making a former "5 iron" now a "6 iron"? Perhaps iron numbers should just be replaced with loft specs. Seems like a good guideline. However, isn't this time getting longer and longer as the improvement increments are getting increasingly smaller? Perhaps today's equipment has 15 years of life time and the equipment in 5 years from now will have 20? Great analysis and agreed, unless offset by demand (which seems unlikely), the cost of such courses would be prohibitively costly. True but that probably would justify club change far less often than what is commonplace now. It's actually possible (additional energy being created by the impact), but I highly doubtful if it could ever be achieved in a golf club, so the point might well be moot
  5. Good point. Changes in the swing, whether by purpose or age or other factors, justify club changes. Yet, I feel like people change clubs way more often than that; every other season, to get the "best" clubs and wonder if that really is warranted. As you might imply, I wouldn't be surprised if most would gain more by fitting a 5 year old or even 10 year old model than buying a new model unfitted.
  6. Driver Loft advice

    From my understanding it depends only on your angle of attack. Personally, Ive worked hard to change my swing to get a positive angle of attack and now use a 7.5 loft on my driver which suits my new swing and impact.
  7. Got an eagle. Short par 4, 285 yards - straight drive landing very close to the hole, managed to keep nerves in check and get the put.
  8. I'll play GI clubs until distance dispersion becomes the primary impediment to my game - if/when that happens I'll try out player's clubs. Anyways, I've realized that visually I don't find a slim top line as important as a short head - I prefer the head compact. That's also why I'm uncomfortable with the 460cc size of all new drivers.
  9. I see your point, I think I was making a more hypothetical point - you could imagine COR >1, some new shafts, ball material and other equipment that could keep pushing the yardage. The fact that COR limit right now is 0.83 and not 0.85 or 1.0 for that matter, I guess is more a matter of drawing the line somewhere?
  10. Two related questions: 1) Do you agree with the COR regulation / regulation in general that restricts manufacturers from producing clubs that create ever longer distances? Personally, while I dislike bans on innovation in principle, I'm somewhat favorable to this. There's a limit to how far you can hit the ball for when you're no longer playing golf. Perhaps, introduce a "no tech limits" variety of golf, with courses adjusted to clubs driving 1000 yards, but otherwise happy with current regulation - interested to hear arguments to the contrary. 2) Given that the incremental improvement in clubs from year to year is so small (if there is one), does it make sense to change golf clubs? It seems to me that most new clubs for the last few years are only improvements in marketing spiel. I think I've read something to that effect as well, i.e. that statistics dispel any notion that current clubs outperform past series, adjusted for the increasingly aggressive lofting (which is just silly). Obviously a threat to golf club manufacturers, but does it makes sense to regularly "upgrade" clubs - any improvement would be so minor that it's probably outbalanced by the performance improvement gained from learning a particular set of clubs by keep playing with them season after season?
  11. Conservative play versus Aggressive

    Stupid aggressive. It hurts everytime I go safe. That's why my handicap is going nowhere fast
  12. What type of golfer are you?

    I'm a reckless and showy golfer. I always go for the pin, green, carrying over obstacles, cutting dog legs, trying shape shots etc even when that's not the smart thing to do. I don't care for the score as much as I care about making the magic stroke. I can't help it - playing safe around the course would greatly improve my score but I would find that so boring. I'm the same in pool, darts and other games based on technique (rather than physical athleticism) - I sacrifice score for the trick shot. Some people appreciate it, others feel the urge to instruct me how to play smart.
  13. Feel with Mallet vs Blade Putters

    I spent half a day at a golf outlet with a putting green, hitting pretty much every putter on display, progressively eliminating putters and finally got the one I have today, based purely on how well I struck it. I still have it and I'm not looking to replace it. It's an Odyssey Versa, mid-mallet, full offset. It seemed to me that shape (blade, mid-mallet, mallet) + offset mostly impacted angle control while weight + insert impacted depth control.
  14. Black wedges?

    So apart from the indirect difference that could come from raw vs chromed clubs, it seems like everybody agrees it's just a look thing. I think what spurred my question was a video on youtube - might have been Rick Shiels - who said that he preferred black for his lob wedges specifically, which I thought was interesting so I was speculating what the reason could be. I could potentially see how black provides a greater contrast against the sand (especially the light type) for bunker shots, or vice versa, how satin or chrome would provide more contrast in the deep rough (or when playing night golf ) so increasing confidence at address but even that seems a bit like a stretch.
  15. which club is more difficult for you?

    Lob wedge.
×

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.