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Dr. Manhattan

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About Dr. Manhattan

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    Weekend Duffer
  • Birthday 11/30/1984

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    10.0
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    Righty

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  1. Those events are not part of Tiger's 82 win total. They are not PGA Tour events.
  2. I don't think it's necessary. Sam was already bitter about his number being reduced to 82 in the first place. It should probably be more in the neighborhood of 75, but we can go down this path with a bunch of the older players. The official numbers for all those guys have been set in stone for long enough that we should leave them alone. Now for Tiger, that was a heck of a performance. Phenomenal iron game, putting, and course management. Driver swing looked pretty dang good in the 3rd and 4th round as well. I hope he can stay healthy for all of this season. Would be awesome to see him in contention at all 4 majors and the Olympics.
  3. I'd like to see him win the PGA Championship to tie Snead and then break the Snead record at Jack's Memorial event. That would be a pretty appropriate place to do it.
  4. Phil's comments really put into perspective Tiger's 80+ wins against modern fields. I don't think Jack was wrong in 1996 about the changes to the Tour and strength of field that occurred from Jack's rookie year to the 1990's. It's just that Tiger is maybe a once in 200 year type of player and has made all of this look much easier than it is.
  5. Excellent post. What do you think of the regular tour wins back in the old days? Weren't a lot of them similar to the PGA Championship where a huge chunk of the field was local club pros? Nothing close to the modern tour where every guy who tees it up is dedicated to being a tour pro.
  6. He has made about $8.35 million during his career, even before touching the pension money. Let's call it $3 million after taking out taxes and various expenses. Seems like a pretty good living to me. He's only 36 years old, so he still has many years to keep piling up the cash earnings along with a bigger pension.
  7. Wonder what Tiger's retirement number might be. I remember years ago there was an estimate that Justin Leonard was around $80 million, meaning Tiger would have been likely way over $100 million. But they are now saying those earlier projections were way too large for all players. Anyway, seems they are doing pretty well for themselves regardless. T. Woods - $20+ million P. Mickelson - $7.5+ million S. Stricker - $7.5+ million V. Singh - $7.5+ million Golden Retirements: PGA Tour Pros Get A Gift That Keeps Giving - Golf Digest Beyond their tournament winnings, PGA Tour pros have a gift that keeps giving: a sweet pension.
  8. I am pretty confident they would not wipe the floor with Tiger. Or maybe you forgot the 3 to 15 year old version of him was using the old ass equipment and shot amazing scores as a small child with it. He has said he wishes the guys in his generation and later were forced to use persimmon/balata because it separates the men from the boys. That was an advantage for the elite players in the old days compared to their peers.
  9. Who knows. Maybe not happy that Nick reported the 2017 Champions Dinner story in the media. Tiger might have said things in that room that he expected the other Champions to keep to themselves instead of spouting to the media about it.
  10. Here's a pretty remarkable coincidence on these two GOAT level players. Tiger won all 4 of Jack's final major appearances: 2000 U.S. Open, 2000 PGA, 2005 Masters, and 2005 British. That's incredible considering peak Tiger "only" won about 30% of the majors from 1997 to 2008.
  11. Swing changes. I don't understand why he felt the need to do this, but he might as well keep his head down and try to reach the light at the end of the tunnel. Once enough time passes and he is more comfortable with the swing changes, I expect him to be a Top 10-20 guy again.
  12. Faldo was extremely fortunate in all 3 of his green jacket victories. Ray Floyd going in the water at the 11th handed the title to him. But you gotta give credit to Faldo for grinding hard and making sure that he gave himself the best chance to take full advantage of these mistakes. Tiger did a great job of that this year at Augusta as well. The water balls at 12 would have meant less if he did not bury the 6 footer for par. That was really critical for him to get the full two shot swing on guys like Koepka, Molinari, and Finau.
  13. Technology helps for sure, but I think Tiger has directly influenced a generation of much better athletes playing the game. The technology revolution primarily occurred around 2001 to 2003. If we look at ball speed numbers in 2009, you can see a dramatic increase in the number of guys with incredible ball speed. 2009 - #10 was Angel Cabrera at 177 mph 2019 - #34 is Seamus Power at 177 mph The top 17 guys are all above 180 mph this season. J.B. Holmes is 18th on the list at 179.30 mph. Brooks Koepka is 28th at 178.25 mph and Dustin Johnson is 29th at 178.07 mph. Jon Rahm is 40th on the list at 175.82 mph. These names being that far down the list is pretty strong evidence regarding the depth of physical talent on tour right now.
  14. Haha, well it happened now! 4 of the top contenders go in the water at Augusta's 12th hole. Molinari goes in the water at 15 as well on top of his water ball at 12. Tiger finally got some of that luck he needed to come from behind after 54 holes in a major. Still cannot believe Molinari & Koepka both went in the water. These guys are very strong with the mental part of the game.
  15. I guess if you think Sean Foley's swing instruction is responsible for the serious back injuries, then you could say it was self-inflicted by Tiger. There is no question the adultery scandal was self-inflicted, but that was only about a two year period (early 2010 through 2011). He won 8 times in 2012-2013 and was by far the #1 ranked player on the planet in summer 2013, which was around the time the back injuries started. I like the fact he is in control of his own golf swing now. No more instructors to give him questionable ideas he might not even trust on the golf course. He's the only one who knows what is comfortable for his back situation at this point, so it makes sense for him to be his own coach.
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