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GOATee

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About GOATee

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  • Birthday June 10

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    Florida

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    9001
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  1. Try looking for a D+, D+plus or a D+plus Limited. These are earlier Diamana White versions that still see regular wins on the PGA tour but should be much cheaper than a DF.
  2. There is no need to match the Driver, 3-wood or hybrid shafts together at all. This is because each club is meant to hit at a different angle of attack (more downward for the shorter clubs and when off the deck) and the shaft is usually of different weights as well to balance the different shaft length. You can confirm this by looking seeing how most pro golfer Winner's Bags that have these three clubs show three different shafts and also of different weights. If you are happy with the shaft/head combination, no need to second-guess it.
  3. If you need confirmation that the Diamana White Board 70 is a competitive shaft, Shane Lowry won the British Open 2019 using a Mitsubishi Diamana White 70X.
  4. The earlier versions of the Diamana White board such as the Ahina, White Board or D+ plus are surprisingly good for 70g shafts. They kept appearing in PGA Winner's Bags (particularly the D+ Plus 70g) even after later generations of the White Board were released. They are not as boardy feeling as the newer white shafts, but are very stable and tip stiff in the 70g weight.
  5. If you go to Club Champion and they have the shafts, you may want to try Tensei AV Blue vs Tensei CK Pro Blue, and Diamana ZF vs BF vs DF, as all 5 of these shafts are all going for the "stiff but maintains some pop" space. Diamana BF series: the latest (4th generation) blue profile shaft, which is the mid launch, mid spin shaft. Justin Thomas uses it. Diamana ZF series: similiar to the BF with a stiffer tip area to reduce spin, supposed to be mid launch, low spin shaft. Diamana DF series: even stiffer and lower spin than the ZF, it mixes the white board mid stiff profile in to be the lowest launch, lowest spin shaft. Tensei CK Pro Blue: new materials version of the Diamana blue board, CK is carbon kevlar, mid launch, mid spin. The CK Pro is the aftermarket version, the CK is the cheaper higher torque version. Tensei AV Blue: the new replacement for the CK Pro Blue, it uses Aluminium Vapor (AV) instead of CK (carbon kevlar) for more consistency.
  6. If you drink beer, your ball will veer (off course). Or not!
  7. The difference between the Ping and Taylormade drivers are that the Pings are all-titanium and the hit sounds like a higher-pitched metallic cowbell ring, while the Taylormades are mostly carbon fiber and have a lower-pitched more muted thud. The other difference is that the Taylormades have a much larger head that some like and others may feel too bulky. It used to be that every year there were some outstanding drivers that were far ahead of the pack but the performance gap between the different brands has narrowed so much that it is now just about fitting and feel which one is best for you. The odd-number Taylormades have a bit lower spin, adjustable sliders and the even-numbers have a bit more forgiveness and are cheaper. The M2 is a classic but the later models are good too.
  8. Sounds about right already. Fish and veggies are anti-inflammatory and will cover a lot of your vitamin needs. Beer and carbs are inflammatory but should not have too large an impact if rationed.
  9. Titleist 917D2 9.5 degrees with Project X Even Flow Blue 6.0s 65g sounds perfect for 95mph swing speed.
  10. I am very familiar with both heads and shafts, having played both. The TS2 head is better because it is more forgiving to poor strikes, but the Tensei 65g R shaft is all wrong for your swingspeed. The stock shaft you would want for that is the HZRDUS Smoke Black 70 or the T1100 75 (see the Titleist website). The 917F2 head is decent though a bit smaller and less forgiving, but the Diamana White 80g S shaft is a perfect match. Best deal would be to get the 917F2 head/80g S shaft for $50. It may not be the best fairway out there, but it is decent and suits your swingspeed for $50. Otherwise, if you want the absolute best, put the $130 towards balls and get fit for a fairway.
  11. Yeah I agree with Bones theory that people just have different muscle recovery schedules. And that some people can mix weights and golf better than others because they heal faster after their weights sessions.
  12. The last 2 wedges in Winner's Bags are almost always 4 degrees apart for good gapping of short chips. 54 and 58 or 56 and 60. Decades of wedge design have proven this. I don't mind bending clubs meant mostly for full swings, but clubs used for short chips with bounce and all, like others said, I would not bend.
  13. Cool. I would not bend the 54 to 53 because the extra degree of loft helps keep the roll short on those important short chips around the green. Perfect 5 degree gapping in this case is not as critical as having that classic 54 58 combination for a short and a super-short chip for an easy putt.
  14. 43 48 54 58 sounds like a bit better gapping to me. That is 5, 6, 4 degrees of gapping, quite playable. From experience, you need the 54 for most standard wedge play and the 58 for lob or deep bunker shots, so those need to stay.
  15. Try both TS1 and TS2. Your swing speed 88mph is borderline between those two. TS series are good drivers. Not really better or worse than other brands. But they have a nice all-titanium traditional sound and feel.
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