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Adam C

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About Adam C

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    Well Established Member

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  • Your Location
    Atlanta

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    4
  • Handedness
    Righty

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  1. Well done on the casting part. Don't see any cast and even better, you have some forward shaft lean at impact. It's definitely still very flat in the plane, but I would just keep working on being consistent with the shaft lean until you're not really even thinking about it, then double back and work on getting more upright.
  2. For tee height you can go two different ways. If you can do it visually, they can be low and just see the club stay outside them. If you do better with direct feedback, then put them at an inch so you can actually make contact with them.
  3. You've got quite a few really good looking elements in your swing. I would say the biggest issue for you related to consistency is posture. Simplest way to see it is on your face on video, look at how your head moves. It's more than just your head but that's the easiest thing to track. It has some movement, which a little of is not a huge issue, however you can see it moving up into and through impact and that rarely has good results. From there it continues up as your whole body looses its posture and you end up basically in a standing position. Fix or drill: If you have a stool this works great but you could also just use the back of a chair. You want the stool at a height where you can just rest your butt on the edge of it with good setup posture. Then you make some practice swings and try and keep contact with the stool. This does two things. First keeps your legs from bending more or straightening in order to keep the same contact point on the stool. Second, the slight sitting posture you need to just rest against the stool is the posture you want to keep throughout the swing especially through contact and into the finish. You can also do this drill against a wall without a club. Put your butt against the wall with good setup posture, and make half swings either mimicking holding a club or just independently hanging your arms down. Work on keeping contact with the wall through the entire movement. The contact point can move from middle to right cheek then to left. That is fine. Again most important is keeping consistent contact through the swing, aka not standing up at impact. I fight this in my swing especially with longer clubs and harder swings, so I alway have the thought "posture through impact" as my key swing thought.
  4. As far as the shallow angle, I would use something simple like 2 tees. Steepening a shallow swing can be tricky b/c it can turn into over the top real quick. I would put one tee in the ground about 4 inches behind the ball and about 2 inches inside (that being towards you. I would mirror the other tee on the other side of the ball 4 inches in front and 2 inches inside. Then really work on both staying clear of the one tee on the back swing (hopefully get it a bit more outside and upright), and clear both tees on the downswing again trying to be more upright but not coming over the top and hitting the second tee in front. Start with pitching swings until you're consistent, then half, then 3/4 etc. The casting is another difficult fix. Not sure what iacas thinks of this idea but I might suggest cheating a little and just strengthening the left hand grip to a solid 2 knuckle view. It makes it harder to cast with a stronger grip. It's not the ideal solution but I think you have to tackle these issues separately b/c they aren't simple fixes. So work on the swing plane first, with a short term fix on the casting, then circle back to the casting. Heck the stronger grip could be a permanent fix in some cases but some golfers just don't like the feel.
  5. Do you hit a lot of shots off the heel or sh--ks especially when you are first getting loose?
  6. I can see from your swings why you have the two issues you described. First, your plane is very flat coming into the ball. On flat fairways you will be fine but on hills or out of rough, this can cause a lot of issues coming into the ball. The fat issue is from the casting motion you have in your down swing where the clubhead has passed your hands before impact. This is a recipe for fat and or thin shots. It's very difficult to time that up and make center face impact.
  7. This is off my youtube channel where I show specifically removal of an adapter, what you need and how you do it. I use a heat gun, you can also use a butane torch. I would not use a MAP torch if you are wanting to save and reuse the shaft.
  8. I would tell you before anything else, go hit the club again on a different day. Between the change in length, lie, weight, there's a lot going on and it might take a bit to adjust to. Also don't hit it at the same time as your other irons, just get a small bucket and focus on it before you make any decisions. Changing to different golf clubs can be like driving a rental car. At first it can feel awkward, as it's different from what you've been used to. But after you drive it for a couple days, it feels natural. I think too many people have this idea that when you get fitted or change something, it will just be an immediate improvement. While this can be the case, often you have to work with the clubs a bit before the results can truly be measured.
  9. It may be more but I can't say without them in front of me. Cast clubs in general will be harder and more brittle which means limited bendability. I can't remember Tommy Armour doing much in the forged realm so most club builders will have a tough time with them.
  10. Those irons probably only have about 1 degree of movement in them in any direction. Any more than that, they may snap.
  11. Frequency or flex is really pretty far down the list of importance. Some may argue with me, but here is my list of what's most important in shafts. 1. Weight- most important by far 2. Radial Consistency- really the only thing I use my freq machine for. Tells me how consistent the shaft is. 3. Balance point- affects SW and feel 4. Bend Profile- high launch vs low launch etc. 5. Torque/ color- not worth worrying about in general Flex can really move around on this list much like price. Both can be more important for some people than others. Remember, in the end the shaft only can do what you make it do. It's not an engine, it's not a whip. If you can square the face at impact, you can play any shaft. If you have trouble with squaring the face at impact or you need more launch (although this is better addressed with other changes), then you may want a softer shaft is it could help close the face at impact based on your swing. So to answer your question, weight is what I would focus more on than flex. Second, making sure it's a good consistent shaft in how it bends. And so on down the list. If you find a shaft you hit well, I can give you recommendations based on weight and bend profile, however this really only works within the framework of that specific club you're using. Picking iron shafts off a driver shaft or vise versa is more unreliable.
  12. Have not ever used or seen them in person. Can't say I have ever worried about the "S waves" in my driver shaft. I have never seen or read anything suggesting that this is a real issue, but again have not tried them so I won't completely discount them.
  13. If you check out my youtube video on cutting dow a shaft, I go through how to measure a club correctly.
  14. .355 taper tip shafts have the tip of the shaft tapered down like the name says on the last inch approx. Because of that each shaft is pre made to go into a specific iron based on weight and launch characteristics. So what they tell you there is what iron number each shaft should go with. That being said, some people will also do what's referred to as hard or soft stepping where you basically put the 7 iron shaft in the 6 iron and continue this pattern through the set (hard stepping) to make it stiffer and lower launch, or put 5 iron shaft in 6 iron etc (soft stepping) to make the set play softer and launch higher. Just as a side note, .370 shafts don't have that tapered end and usually just come in one length (usually 41 inches). In this case you have to cut the tip section first based on shaft brand recommendations to get the correct flex and launch for each iron head, then continue the process we've already discussed. You will still have to butt cut the shafts before gripping, because the uncut length is still too long. Make sure you understand how to measure clubs correctly so you get the right length.
  15. Just to be sure, you may want to pull one of the old shafts and measure the tip. I kind of feel like I have seen TAs in both .355 and .370. May be wrong but... Yes, you would order an extra 36 for the wedge. As far as butt cutting them, some people keep all the wedges the same final length, some like to trim them at small increments so that the LW is slightly shorter than SW, which is slightly shorter than PW. Personal preference. I usually keep them the same so the higher lofts don't get too short. As for the other stuff, don't PURE, never PURE, total waste of money and time. If you do need .355 tip shafts, you don't tip cut them, only butt cut to final length (which you should really only do after you have epoxied the heads, so you can get accurate measurements). Tip prepping refers to just roughing up the tip section where the shaft fits in the head. If you have a belt sander, or even just sand paper, it's simple to do yourself. Just trying to remove some of the chrome finish, rough it up a bit to get a better epoxy bond.
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