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Jrryan97

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About Jrryan97

  • Rank
    Newbie
  • Birthday April 5

Personal Information

  • Your Location
    TN

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    15
  • Handedness
    Righty
  1. I’m confused at what calculations need to be done on the golf course. I can understand getting a base line for atmospheric conditions for example I know I can hit my 7 Iron x yards in calm wind at course A and y yards in calm wind at course B. But they don’t have access to other inputs needed to change those calculations mid round. Looks to me like you could just jot down a chart with 13 rows and as many columns as you have shot types and just reference how far you hit each club. Or do like everyone else and just remember it...
  2. I think there is something missing in this discussion. I keep seeing references to LPGA efficiency, but don’t think anyone has taken into account they have been properly fitted for their equipment. I consider myself a recreational golfer who loves the game and may get blasted for the comments I am about to make, but will make them anyway... What is my handicap? Not really sure, I’m guessing there is a high percentage of good and bad players who don’t have an established handicap. I have played on and off my entire life and just really got back into playing 3-4 years ago, and I did the smartest thing ever this summer and took a lesson. I was tired of being able to hit my driver 265 yards down the middle and not be able to score, any time I had to hit an iron over 120 yards I was lost and unpredictable. After a bad round, I finally talked to the staff at the pro shop and got the number of the pro who gives lessons, best decision made and best money I have ever spent. I look back and say why not a lesson earlier, I knew the answers cause I had told them to myself for years thoughts such as these always came to mind; too expensive, no way I can afford to pay hundreds of dollars a week for several weeks... too embarrassing, lessons are given by pros and a pro will think I’m terrible and just laugh at me... won’t work, I’ve been swinging a golf club for years and not gotten any better, I’m probably just not talented enough to be a good golfer. Boy was I wrong with all those thoughts, lesson was cheap less than the cost of a round of golf. Only one lesson was needed and I have became good friends with the pro who gave me the lesson. I also have been playing much better and the game is more enjoyable. So I agree a lesson is important, But I also think that having the right shaft for my swing speed and spin rate are essential to get the yards needed on the course. Keeping all my comments in mind I think the original post on this thread is a chicken and the egg problem. What do you need to learn first ? To swing a club that fits your swing speed at a fast enough speed for distance while hitting the center of the club face consistently.
  3. Is slow play a problem? It can be. There could be many reasons for slow play and it could be a different reason each time you experience it. Slow play can be caused by players of all levels and you cannot always blame the group immediately ahead of you for it. Is there a way to always police slow play outside of a league, tour or tournament and make EVERYONE happy? Absolutely not. if you were put in a position in which your income depended on the profits made from a golf course, how would you try to solve the problem?
  4. Solving one “issue” may create other real issues. At the professional level the solution is simple if you want to compete with those who swing harder, learn to swing harder or be twice as good as those in other aspects. I don’t see anyone winning on tour who is only a good driver and nothing else. For amateurs move up a tee. What’s seen cannot really be unseen, you cannot expect to make existing equipment non conforming and you expect everyone to comply outside of tournaments where equipment would be inspected. Why not just limit better equipment and longer flying golf balls from being produced in future. That would mean golfers wouldn’t have to keep buying new equipment to keep up, that could save an astronomical amount of money. That would solve the problem completely, the weekend golfer could continue to hit his drive 220 yards claiming it to be the magical distance of 300 yards and not have to worry about how much further pros hit it since PGA events will no longer be televised because of lack of sponsorships from major golf manufacturers.
  5. Most high end simulators allow the variables to be set. Including atmospheric variables. I play on a full swing simulator with e6 software. If you want to score well on the simulator then you can turn off the wind and terrain penalties. Without terrain penalties trees have 0 impact, your ball will keep going as if the tree was not there. You can also set fairway and green hardness. But to get back to the question it depends on what type of golfer you are and what course you play (simulator and real) and what settings the simulator has applied. If you hit the ball accurately and consistently in real life and keep it in the fairway then scores are going to be close. Courses with trees such as Pinehurst #2 are more difficult than Beach courses such as Kiawah Island. You can get up and down from 3-4 feet high rough on a simulator where you would have probably lost a ball in real life. You never have any obstructions preventing you from getting a club on the ball when hitting off a mat. On the course you can hit 1 yard out of the fairway and get terrible lie. To me the simulator is harder inside 20 yards than on the real course. It also depends on how good of a putter you really are from inside the gimmie range in the simulator( give yourself everything within 6 feet on a real course and see your scores go down there too ) An experienced simulator golfer is probably 3-5 strokes better on a good day than on a real course. On a bad day 5-10 strokes better on the simulator. An experienced golfer who had never played a simulator is probably 10 or more strokes worse on a simulator until they get comfortable with it. my last 9 holes on a real course I shot 43, my last 9 on a simulator I shot 44. But I’m guess Phonex Country Club is a littler harder than my local course
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