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Golfnutgalen

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10 Now on the Tee

About Golfnutgalen

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    Member
  • Birthday 02/07/1990

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    Montana, USA

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    10.0
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    Righty

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  1. There is a stat which is very similar to strokes gained which goes back quite a bit further all the way to 1983. Here is the tour's definition of both stats: Stroke Differential to field average: Average strokes per round played that a player was better/worse than the per round field average. Strokes Gained Total: The per round average of the number of Strokes the player was better or worse than the field average on the same course & event. So at first glance they seem the same, but there are definitely differences exactly why is unclear to me. Does SG use an additional ad
  2. I thought this one was humorous. WHO KNOWS MORE ABOUT THE GOLF SWING: YOU OR BRANDEL CHAMBLEE? Me: 18% Chamblee: 82% Hot takes: “He seems like he knows more.” “I don’t know anything about the golf swing.” “I hate to admit it, but Brandel.” “He knows more about everything.”
  3. Not important, but I messed up on Vijay's numbers. there was a tournament which was cancelled after two rounds and I thought it was a missed cut. He should be 3rd alone with 53 consecutive cuts made. Vijay was a beast!
  4. I did some digging and found out some more information regarding Tiger Woods' consecutive cut streak and cut streaks in general. I remember clearly back when people tried to diminish his record because it included many no-cut events. Well, it turns out the same can be said of every other player as well! According to a sports illustrated article from 2003 only around 30% of the events included in Byron Nelson's 113 steak had a 36-hole cut. To make this clear, even the Masters had no cut until 1957 and players who finished outside of the money are not labeled as a missed cut. Anyway the point i
  5. The field is pretty strong this week actually. I heard a win is worth over 60 points which is just over the points value of McIlroy's Tour Championship win.
  6. Just made this graph. I was tempted to change the numbers, but I don't want to jinx Tiger!
  7. Here are the rest of the strokes gained top 10. Just remember Tiger had 5 other years which would have a good chance at making the grade. Strokes Gained Total 2004-’19 1)+3.82 - Tiger Woods, 2008 (only 6 events) 1)+3.30 - Tiger Woods, 2006 2)+3.19 - Tiger Woods, 2009 3)+3.09 - Tiger Woods, 2007 4)+2.55 - Rory McIlroy, 2019 5)+2.50 - Jim Furyk, 2006 6)+2.41 - Rory McIlroy, 2012 7)+2.40 - Tiger Woods, 2005 8)+2.38 - Tiger Woods, 2004 9)+2.37 - Dustin Johnson, 2018 10)+2.31 - Tiger Woods, 2012 There's another stat
  8. He hasn't played in forever. For the year he's 54th in accuracy and 69th in strokes gained off the tee so there are plenty worse than him.
  9. You do know Patrick has had 8 top 10s already including a 3rd in the PGA and is 1st in scoring average right? Much of that has been ignored in favor of complaining about his pace of play, but the dude has been solid.
  10. The problem with putting Phil in front at #3 is somebody like Rory could pass his 5 major total quite easily. When Phil was Rory's age he had 13 wins and 0 majors. Rory has 15 and 4 in case anybody forgot while playing fewer events in his early years on tour. The Tom Watson comparison is more interesting. They had similar win percentages at their best (11% for Watson, 9.4% for Phil), but Tom has 3 extra majors while being 5 short in total wins. What is a bit crazy to consider nowadays is Tom was credited with only 32 wins as late as 1994, none of those 5 Open wins were official at the tim
  11. The match of the Century is mostly meaningless though, not much more than a silly season event. As for the rest I disagree, both players played great golf in basically the same time frame and Jones was superior in the events they both attended. In the 13 majors they both played Jones got the better of Hagen 10 times and won 5 while Hagen never won an Open with Jones in the field. That's fairly dominant in my eyes. Also going back to the US Open importance, Jones won 4 vs Hagen's 2. I can see justifying ranking Hagen over Jones on the strength of his 45 total tour wins, but that seems a bit unf
  12. Indeed. I've tried in the past to make a case for both Byron and Snead over Hogan, but I don't think it's a strong enough argument. Correct me if I'm wrong, the US Open was huge back in the day by far the most important tournament in US golf up until maybe 1960 When the Masters gained a ton of traction. Even ignoring the accident, Ben Hogan won 25% of his events up until age 40 which is something nobody has done since outside of Tiger Woods. Best win percentages up to age 43 post-Bobby Jones 1. Ben Hogan (43) 1932-1957 - 63 wins in 262 events (24.05%) 2. Tiger Woo
  13. Another vote for Ben Hogan here. The dude had a stretch were he played in 5 US Opens and won 4 finishing 3rd in the other! I think the numbers actually favor Sam over Ben 64 and 9 vs 81 and 7, but that US Open record has clinched it for me. I think Arnold Palmer doesn't get enough recognition nowadays as well, 62 wins 7 majors in an arguably tougher era in golf - vs the WWII era.
  14. You're welcome Brocks! I'm glad my intent wasn't misunderstood as an insult or anything like that. Jack's win percentage numbers are incredible and nobody who started their career after him has been even close - with one notable exception of course. I made a list of the greats career numbers up to about age 45 and after Jack and the best I could find was Vijay Singh at 8.29%. Rory is slightly higher at this moment (9.5%), but it is a tall ask for him to retain that number 15 years down the road. 1. Ben Hogan (45) 1932-1958 - 63 wins in 265 events (23.77%) 2. Walter Hag
  15. I just wanted to add that the data you have for Nicklaus is a little off as far as I know. You forgot to remove the majors from his regular event total. Also the tour's website doesn't include the Open in their total starts stat up until 1995 the date it became an official event. I'm not trying to be rude, I just spent a lot of time on gathering the stats myself a while back. Here's Jack from his first pro event in 1962 to the end of 1978: Won 53 of the 285 regular events, or 18.6%. Won 15 of the 68 majors, or 22.1%. Total win percentage: 19.26% And Tiger from 1996-2009
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