Jump to content

SQ Bimmer

Established Member
  • Content Count

    293
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Sandbagger

About SQ Bimmer

  • Rank
    League Member
  • Birthday 11/30/1981

Your Golf Game

  • Handicap Index
    21.7
  • Handedness
    Righty
  1. Ehh, I'm not a fan of suggesting drivers over the internet honestly. I think the OP needs to get to a big golf shop and spend a good half hour trying out different drivers on a launch monitor, then leave without buying anything. Rinse and repeat until you find something that works for you. I dunno if I would bother getting fitted, you're not going to be able to produce consistent enough swings for a fitter to really analyze. Plus you probably swing differently one day versus the next.
  2. I doubt the dent affects playability. Do you really just not like everything about the driver, or do you not like the results you get with the driver? If the latter, I suggest you stop blaming the driver. If the former, well, you need to like the club you're using in order to feel confident with it, but it's easy to cross the line between not liking the aspects of the club, and not liking the results you are getting with it.
  3. LOL hilarious! I think I will watch the full episode. Love Hulu.
  4. I played Hemet GC recently. Not a bad course. Welcome to the board.
  5. 6 months previous driver, 1 year for my current driver, and will likely be changing it out this summer. For me, it's because of my swing changing/getting more consistent as my handicap has come down. I'm ready to get fit for a driver now, will probably keep that for at least 2 years.
  6. SQ Bimmer

    Golf expenses

    Oh man, I just realized I never thanked my parents for letting me play hockey when I was a kid. 1-2 weekly practices plus weekly games that they drove me to and back and hung around during... All that equipment! Damn, looking back and comparing to life now with work, commuting, being tired from all of that, etc, that was a huge thing that they did for me. I just thanked them. My Step Dad said you're welcome and then my mom started ranting about "the damn hockey pants" that were really expensive (although cheaper than my skates...). HAHA Oh man I love the holidays. Going to spend the day with my Step Dad and help him build a wall. So yea, to the OP, ALWAYS make sure your parents know you are thankful. I wish I had that information when I was a kid, maybe I would have been even more privileged! They helped me out a lot with college too. I graduated a while ago, but seeing how it took me 12 years to thank them for hockey, I figure I have a few more years to go before I'll thank them properly for college. Maybe next year during Thanksgiving. HAHAHA
  7. Ahh, thread ruined because of the second question asked of the OP. OP should have just asked the first question. That said, I know a 15 handicap that plays SGI irons. Looks like every one of his clubs is a hybrid without the cavity filled in. HUGE soles, dunno what brand they are exactly, hence the horrible description on my part. I personally play GI irons. I just can't stand the look of SGI irons at address and that does me no good when I go to make a swing. So like people said, use whatever irons inspires the most confidence in you. If you wana spend some cash, go get fitted.
  8. Unless the putt is close enough to where you're going to walk up and tap it in quickly, you should mark it and let the person farthest out take their turn. If you are going to spend any time lining up, practice swings, etc, you should mark.
  9. Yea, I decide before a round whether or not I am going to record it. Luckily I have not had any stellar rounds while doing this!
  10. I know there are no set standards for what to call the wedge, but in general.. -49 - pitching 50 - 53 - gap 54 - gap/sand 55 - 57 - sand 58 - sand/lob 59+ - lob In between ranges I would call gray area one way or the other. Add a lot of bounce to any wedge between 54* and 58* and I would call it my "sand wedge" if it were in my bag.
  11. SQ Bimmer

    Iron Covers?

    Do you take out a club depending on course conditions?
  12. SQ Bimmer

    Iron Covers?

    I have cast clubs, so not too worried about bag chatter. I only use them when walking because I don't like walking with a chattering bag near someone taking a shot. It's easier to just keep walking than have to stop while the person takes their shot, or to try to hold the clubs still. I always make sure that my clubs are dry before storing them, whether I use the head covers or not.
  13. I doubt anyone is offended. I'm certainly not. I think I see where you are going with this now. I would possibly look into a wine tasting class or gathering of some sort at a local tasting room. Or if you have a friend that is very experienced with tasting and can actually describe things to you, pair foods, etc, that could work out. This is sort of similar to seeing a PGA Pro for golf lessons btw, the person needs to have some skill and experience! Classes are offered almost everywhere, at least out here. You will likely be tasting a lot of wines from CA and South America, some Europe and "down under." I sort of learned things by utilizing a LOT of experimentation, various "wine of the month clubs," etc. With a lot of trial and error, a lot of money spent on wine that I didn't like, and my girlfriend and I going to tasting rooms here and there, I have my palate figured out for the most part, and can appreciate wines that don't fit my palate exactly. Being from California, it's very easy for us to find a tasting room at a winery that actually grows their own grapes on site. Other places buy grapes and processes them at their location, those are good too. You may find places such as the latter locally, but they may be expensive since grapes don't travel well, and they need to be crushed fairly quickly after picking. More than likely you will have tasting rooms offering non-local wines bottled well beyond your states borders; however, I don't know much about growing grapes in SC, I could be totally wrong! Regarding your issue with a wine tasting sour or having a bad aftertaste, maybe that could be resolved with a proper food pairing. Maybe take your wife to a fine restaurant that is known to have an extensive wine selection, and ask the server, host, etc, for suggestions on pairing a wine with your meal, cheese, fruit, chocolate, etc. You will be surprised how well a certain food will make a wine taste. Don't be shy to tell them that you don't know a thing about pairing food/wine and you would like to learn so long as they have the time to explain some things. Tasting wine is not always a conscious thing, which is what you seem to be trying to make it out to be. That can complicate things, just like with a golf swing. Sometimes you just need to have the right pairing and take a SWI n G !
  14. I definitely enjoy both, and they both serve a different purpose. It depends what I am eating, the weather, what activity I may be involved in, what my partners are drinking, etc. Given all that, beer may be a better fit as well. I generally default to red wine though, as I can really appreciate it. Good scotch can't be beat though. I loves me some Laphroaig or Johnny Blue. As far as forcing yourself to like wine, that's not the right attitude! Drink what you enjoy, but don't bring it down for those around you if someone decides to open a bottle of wine and give you a pour. Just take it slow and enjoy yourself and don't mention how you don't like it, think it's just rotted fruit, etc, you will just ruin the mood. Sip it slowly and if someone offers you a second pour, politely refuse and continue enjoying what's in your glass. Maybe bring up conversation about how you love yourself a good scotch, maybe the host will have some and you can work your way to a scotch for your second drink! Some very good tips above on how to enjoy it though. I too agree on the "all about the fruitiness and palatability" thing. I have no idea what that means. Maybe I'm not cultured enough with wine? Ehh, I have been drinking wine for a very long time and I have fairly specific requirements for a wine before I may purchase it if I am out tasting somewhere. Palatability is a foundation, for sure. Beyond that, it gets more complex, and only you can decide how complex that is: dry, sweet, flavors of this, that, mouthfeel, aftertaste, etc.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...