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  1. This thread typically gets started one way or another, so I may as well start it here. When you play a round of golf, pop open this thread and add a comment. Tell us your score, tell us how you played, and so on. I'll kick it off... Today I shot what would have been about a 78 or a 79 at my home course. Tough to say since I didn't putt (I gave myself two putts on all but three holes where I'd stuffed it within 5 feet - any missed I'd have made there I figure would have been balanced out by the five putts I had from 5-10 feet). Temporary greens, you see. A week ago we had a foot or two of snow. Today it was 40-45 degrees and the ground was soggy, but very little snow existed. I was one of about ten golfers out there. The lack of much wind was nice - 45 degree weather plays about a club shorter. I'll write more later. Gonna post a picture or two from my camera phone. Note: this thread should contain only posts about your score. No replies, please!
  2. As we all know, golf is hard, so here's a quick tip on making it easier Turn both feet out at address. I grew up playing golf at a course in San Francisco where Ken Venturi was an honorary member. I got to play nine holes with him once and he told me that he could identify a good golfer because the walked with "duck feet ". I never really understood what that meant until I was taught the benefits of flaring the feet at set-up. If you're a regular on the site I'm sure you've seen that @iacas and I recommend this to a lot of golfers. As @iacas likes to say, you get a few things for free by flaring your feet out. Golfers from all over the world post their swings in Member Swing threads and many of them fall into the mistake of having square feet at address. We recommend they turn both feet out and it's amazing how much a simple adjustment can make towards hitting the ball more solid. Makes us look like geniuses or something. The quick and short of it is: flaring both feet out about 30-35 degrees rotates the knees out, the golfer will be slightly "bow" legged. The knees being oriented outward helps: - Turn the hips on the backswing and keeps the hips centered, important for Key #1. - Transfer the lead knee forward on the downswing to achieve or improve Keys #2, #3 and even #4. You can stop reading now or continue if you want more info 1 Taking a look at the address positions we can see that on the left my feet are square, this generally rotates the knees inward a little. On the right it's the opposite, feet are flared and the knees are rotated outward a little. The right pic is the position I recommend you copy. 2 Many golfers complain about flexibility and struggle with achieving a "full" turn but typically the problem isn't their mobility, it's how their feet/knees are aligned at address. To make a "full" pivot and keep the head steady (Key #1) the lead knee gains in flex as the trail knee lessens in flex on the backswing. The knees are a one-plane joint and pointing them out slightly assists in turning the hips during the backswing. The trail knee just decreases in flex on the angle that it's set on. If the trail knee is "kicked in" at set-up (left pic) the knee won't be able to move in a way that keeps the hips turning "in a circle". The hips will stall or even slide back (left pic below) and it typically leads to problems on the downswing. The motion of the lead knee is also important to turning the hips and keeping them centered. As the lead knee gains flex on the backswing it also rotates inward a bit. The outward orientation of the knee regulates how much the lead knee can flex inward. On the left (foot wasn't flared at address) you can see the lead knee has collapsed inward. This can be a position that's tough to "recover" from in terms of getting the weight forward enough on the downswing. 3 Moving on to the downswing and Key #2. Having the lead foot flared out at address allows the lead knee to move forward longer. Also a trail knee that is rotated outward is less likely to flex towards the golf ball during the downswing. In the left pic, since my knee was rotated inward at set-up, my knee is restricted by how far forward it can go. This hurts my ability to hit the ball solid because my weight isn't forward enough and as a result my hands are too far back. 4 When the lead knee can't transfer forward, the hands lag behind my pivot and this causes the club head to overtake the hands at a fast rate (casting). On the left I've reached inline (lead arm and club shaft) before impact. Obviously a different picture on the right. Since my lead foot was flared, my knee was able to flex forward longer and I could get my hands further forward. I've achieved Key #3 Inline Impact. Key #3 often comes as a result of a solid or improved Key #1 or Key #2. It's important to note that flaring your feet at address doesn't guarantee you're going to master Keys #1-3 right away. You still have to practice and work hard on your priority piece. Also, there are many great players out there that have square trail foot positions (most good players have the lead foot flared) and are able to make centered pivots and hit the ball very solid. Also the trail foot being flared isn't a "fundamental" but this set-up piece can definitely simplify your pivot and improve your mechanics. Most pros start playing golf when they are young and hit thousands of balls "grooving" their swing. Most of you reading this thread don't have that luxury. You don't have much free time to practice and you need to make the most of it when you do get out on the range. So make golf a little bit easier and flare those feet out.
  3. Just wondering what breach of etiquette you have committed due to a bad shot or score? As all golfers know, anger seems to crop up easily after bad shots. I will start by giving an example of what I have done, although not proud of, but yet the truth. This: After missing a 2-foot bogey putt I took a hard swipe with my putter to knock my ball off the putting surface, only to hit it fat and take a chunk out of the green. Now I am a proponent of good etiquette, but I let my anger get the best of me that day.
  4. Hi All, Thought Id start a thread so people can discuss strategies they have adopted to help break 90 consistently for those of an ability at around this level. Accepting that making par on some, if not most, holes is just not realistic given my skill set. So I add a +1 to the par of these holes and aim for that. I also adjust club selection accordingly. Such as hitting shorter clubs off some par 4 and par 6 tees to reduce the chance of going off the course, such as favouring my hybrids over my driver, that I have specifically in my bag for this. I can generally hit them straighter and my 3 hybrid goes only 30m less than my driver. Favouring a putting, chip and run chipping style to reduce the chance of duffing or blading my chips wherever possible. Putting strategy: dedicating much more time practicing my putting, specifically putts 5 foot to the cup. Ive been hammering the circle drill. With my chips and lag putting I aim to get within 5 feet, then if I keep working on these 5 foot and less putts my chances of two putting will hopefully improve. Putting my ego away when I go off the course. Accepting I need to chip out rather than trying the hail mary out of the bushes. Practicing: Deliberately dedicating more time practicing putting and chipping. Aiming for targets on the range. What strategies do you guys have that help?
  5. I was talking with our local golf course manager the other day about the lack of sand and maintenance of bunkers on our course and he told me that the cost per square foot to maintain a bunker is now almost the same cost to maintain a green. They have to be edged and raked, bunker faces need to be packed and sand needs to be added because it gets washed away over time through normal erosion. Furthermore, unless you're playing at a high end country club where dues can simply go up and the membership has to pay (and can afford to) in order to maintain conditions to the highest standard possible, declining conditions of bunkers is going to become more prevalent at most golf courses. He cited an example where a particular deep bunker on our course had new sand added to a depth of 4", the faces were packed and the edges were trimmed. It took 4 men all day plus the cost of the sand which isn't the everyday stuff that you can get at any local quarry. That night there was a thunderstorm and downpour and the next morning that very same bunker was completely washed out, wasting the 32 man-hours that could have been used to maintain other areas of the golf course. The summation of the conversation is as follows: Golf courses around the country have had their maintenance budgets cut, from an average of 50% of their gross profit to 30%. Most of their budget is spent on labor so there are fewer on staff to do the work and so they are focusing on higher priority areas of the golf course. On our course we have all pretty much adapted the lift, rake and replace procedure for those balls that are in bunkers that are in poor condition.
  6. Here's a new thread I hope to keep going (I've made it sticky so, like "What'd you shoot today?" it shows up at the top all the time). What was your best shot of the week? Drop by here once a week, think back, and tell us about your particular mastery of one shot or another. Mine came yesterday. I was playing with my cousins and uncle (we only got six holes in before it rained), and we came to the second hole. I put one just off the fairway but a tree knocked it down. I was behind another tree. I had a partial backswing and a fairly full follow-through. 180 yards to the pin, gently downhill, ball about four inches above my feet. Pulled a 5I, put it back, hooded it a bit, and flew it about 120 in the air and rolled it the last sixty yards. Left the 20-foot birdie putt a foot short. I love shots where I have to get creative. Sometimes I even manage to pull them off! As with one or two other threads here, this one is a "post-only" thread with no responses. Feel free to quote a post and respond to it in a new thread if it warrants it.
  7. When I first started playing, I had what some call the "flying elbow." When I started playing more consistently, I learned to tuck my elbow in on the takeaway. What happened was I could hit my irons and wedges straighter and more consistently, but I've lost a lot of power on my driver. I know that Nicklaus had an elbow that wasn't tucked, and his explanation was that it generated more power. I see others with untucked elbows, and their drives are consistently longer than mine. I'm thinking about letting loose with my driver and woods and seeing what happens. I have a history of lower back problems and herniated discs (they both needed epidurals), so simply increasing my turn or torque is not an option. I know the young guns on Tour have a severe right elbow tuck throughout their swing, but I am neither young or on Tour. As we all know, if you go looking for advice on the internet, you end up in a veritable rabbit hole with contradicting tips and "expert" opinions. The Golf Section of the local bookstore is jam-packed with books which promote or disapprove of the right elbow, the planted lead foot, etc. Without getting into weight shift and angle of attack, what are your thoughts on this?
  8. One of the shots I really struggle with is hitting 3 wood off the deck. I tend to have about 2 times a round where I want to hit this shot. Far too frequently, I tend up with horrible contact (like a top), or end up with a crazy bad miss. I'm wondering if there is some set up issues that I have when hitting 3 wood off the deck. I'm guessing that my inconsistency is because this is the hardest shot in golf, and you need to have a great swing to hit this shot consistently. Nonetheless, what is the proper way to set up for this shot? For reference, I've tried the following to see if I could improve this shot: Putting the ball more in the middle of my stance (like where I would play a wedge) Putting the ball more forward in my stance (a few inches behind my front foot; pretty close to a driver) Trying to sweep the ball more Trying to hit down on the ball more Choking up on the club None of these have led to more consistent contact. I'm not the only person who struggles with this, I know, so I figured this could be useful to lots of other people. Even though I suspect the answer is that it's more to do with the swing than any set up issues...
  9. So I've been practicing the Quickie Pitch shot. I always hear weight forward on a pitch or even a chip. I've never known the proper way to have the weight forward. Nothing feels right when I do it. I feel like I'm way too stuck just leaning toward the target and pivoting feels weird.....Also, when I move my weight forward, I tend to feel like my left shoulder is lower to the ball and my head is forward of the ball too.....I just feel way too uncomfortable when I try to put my weight forward So what is the proper way to do this? Like where on the foot should I feel that weight? Heel or toe? More toward the instep? Do the shoulders stay level and head behind the ball?
  10. Checkerfred, you are right to ask this. It must be practiced because it is not natural to do so. To answer your questions, you put your weight forward quite a bit, to the point that your left foot (right-handed) will roll some. Your left knee bends considerably in front of that foot, and just about all of your weight is over on the left side. Check out the vids though. I did.
  11. The Skinny I'm excited to share a little bit of an insider peek here at the next shoe from TRUE Linkswear: the TL-01. Though I wear a lot of my TRUE shoes everywhere - to the movies, to dinner, to a bike trail, etc. - the TL-01 is specifically designed to go everywhere from the job to the tee box. I'm really looking forward to giving these a try, specifically as a teaching shoe - the zero drop shoe (a nice return from the admittedly pretty-low-but-not-quite-zero Major, Original, and Knit) will be comfortable and stylish, and yet if I have a free block and want to play some golf or hit some shots, will be perfect. Or if I have to meet my wife at dinner. Some photos of the shoes first… The Details Sizing: 8, 8.5-11.5, 12, 13 Colorways: Classic Black, Vintage White (both July 1), Grey Area (late July) Overview: The insanely light TL-01 is a shoe created to seamlessly transition from the office to the links and everywhere in between. The TL-01 is crafted from the finest full grain weatherproof Nappa leather and is durable enough for anything your life can throw at it. Don't be fooled, though, as the TL-01 weighs only 8.7 ounces, TRUE's lightest shoe yet. Packed in the TRUE canvas bag (the Majors come in these, too), this complete package makes the TL-01 a perfect shoe for just about any activity… especially golf! Basically: Lightweight - Weighing 8.7 ounces, you'll barely notice the TL-01 on your feet despite the full grain Nappa leather upper. Zero Drop Cushioned Outsole - Featuring a natural zero-drop outsole for stability and natural balance, with just enough cushion to keep your feet feeling great all day long. Versatile Tread - The TL-01 has ample grip to take on the links (the tread is the same depth as the Original and the Major), but works well on pavement, carpet, and everything in between, from the board room to the card room to the locker room. Traditional Width Fit - A bit of a narrower shoe than the other TRUE offerings, the TL-01 will form to your foot over time and accommodate up to an E width.
  12. I just received my Mevo and have a couple questions. I haven't read all 17 pages of this thread yet, so I apologize if these have been answered. I will mostly be using this outdoors into a net. Do I set it as indoors or outdoors? I got the impression that the outdoor setting is more for the driving range than into a net. If I set the distance from ball to Mevo at 6 feet and leave it there, what effect does it have if I move the Mevo up or back a foot for wedges vs driver? Do I really need to change this setting each time I change this distance? My son and I will both be using this. Is there a convenient way to track our data separately without having to log in/out of separate accounts each time we switch who is hitting? I assume I am best off to use the same ball that I use on the course instead of the hodge podge of balls in my shag bag, many of which are cheap distance balls. I am trying to use a little higher quality ball. And then I just have to figure out how to make up some of the 10 mph club head speed and 30 yard carry distance advantage that my son has on me.
  13. I'm happy to have found this thread. I had a guy show me this that worked with a very well known teacher here and he showed him this technique. I never could get it down consistently and couldn't figure out why. He didn't explain it like this though, so hopefully I can nail it now. On this shot, or even a chip, when you put the weight forward, where on the foot should I feel that weight? I've never known the proper way to have the weight forward. Nothing feels right when I do it. I feel like I'm way too stuck and can't pivot good.....I just feel way too uncomfortable when I try to put my weight forward. Also, would float loading not encourage more forward shaft lean since the hands are moving forward on the downswing earlier than the club head?
  14. Apologies to Dave if OT. I figured it might help him understand his swing a bit more while maybe giving me a little assistance. I definitely didn't want to distract him off what he is working on or make him start thinking about something else. I really like that aspect of his swing. I'll stop posting on this thread after this post. I've been thinking about starting my own swing thread. I was recording myself in my backyard net a couple weeks ago, but at the time had no way to put it into slo-mo. I think I have a way to do it now, so a swing thread will eventually happen. The clubs are getting put away for winter soon, so I may wait until spring so I can actually work on it - or maybe I'll post something just as a placeholder so I can compare my spring swing to where it was this fall. I'm also trying to lose weight right now, so it might be good for me to see how that is coming along next spring. Generally getting my weight to the front foot is not an issue for me, but rather a flaw that occasionally rears it's ugly head. Thanks all.
  15. MAC MODEL Bennett and Plumber took instruction from Mac and wrote Stack and Tilt. Stack and tilt was the rage and then was not. Mac was not stack and tilt in their sense but many similarities exist. It may be the most efficient way to create optimum compression consistently. Watch this: Comments??? **P1 – ADDRESS:** - FEET WIDE LEFT TOE OUT ABOUT 34 DEGREES - ARMS HANGING NATURALLY WITH A LITTLE SET IN LEFT WRIST - LEFT WRIST CUPPED, RIGHT WRIST STRAIGHT - CENTRE OF HIPS JUST INSIDE HEELS - RIGHT EAR STRAIGHT LINE TO CENTRE OF HIP - RIGHT ARMPIT TO FRONT OF RIGHT KNEE - SHAFT PLANE TO BELT BUCKLE OR MIDDLE OF HIPS WHERE SHIRT MEETS PANTS - WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION EVEN - KNEES SLIGHTLY OUTWARDS AS IF SITTING ON HORSE - ANKLES WIDER THAN KNEES - TOES FLARED OUT TO HELP RIGHT LEG STRAIGHTEN WHICH ALLOWS FOR EXTERNAL ROTATION IN HIP AND LEFT LEG FLEX WHICH ALLOW FOR SPINE TO TILT SLIGHTLY TO LEFT - CENTRE OF CHEST OVER HIPS - HEAD TILTED SLIGHTLY TOWARD TARGET - RIGHT SHOULDER CONSIDERABLY LOWER THAN LEFT MAKING RIGHT EYE LOWER THAN LEFT EYE AND RIGHT EAR LOWER THAN LEFT - SHAFT LEANING FORWARD SLIGHTLY - HANDS OPPOSITE INSIDE OF LEFT HIP - BALL ABOUT 2 INCHES INSIDE OF LEFT HEEL (LOOKS LIKE MID-IRON) P2 – SHAFT PARALLEL TO GROUND: - CLUB HEAD DISSECTS SHAFT PLANE LINE - LEFT HAND JUST OUTSIDE OF RIGHT LEG ABOVE KNEE - RIGHT ARM STARTING TO FOLD - NO LATERAL MOVEMENT - RIGHT FOREARM ALONG AND PARALLEL TO SHAFT PLANE LINE TO ELBOW P3 – LEFT ARM PARALLEL TO GROUND: - SHAFT 90 DEGREES - LEFT SHOULDER UNDERNEATH CHIN AND IN CENTER OF HIPS - RIGHT LEG STRAIGHTENING AND LEFT LEG FLEXES INCREMENTALLY AND RIGHT HIP MOVING TARGETWARD - HANDS DISSECTING JUST UNDERNEATH RIGHT BICEP - HIPS APPROXIMATELY LEVEL, RIGHT MAY BE MARGINALLY HIGHER - RIGHT LEG 174 DEGREES P-4: TOP - MORE STRAIGHTENING OF RIGHT LEG AND MORE FLEXING OF LEFT LEG ALLOWING RIGHT HIP TO TURN MORE BEHIND HIM - RIGHT LEG 168 DEGREES - CONTINUED ROTATION IN RIGHT HIP - LEFT ARM PARALLELS SHOULDERS - RIGHT FORARMS SIMILAR TO SPINE ANGLE BUT SLIGHTLY MORE UPRIGHT - FACE ANGLE PARALLEL TO LEFT WRIST, FOREARM AND SHOULDERS - SPINE TILTING TO LEFT P-5: LEFT ARM PARALLEL TO GROUND - WITH KNEES SEPARATING SLIGHT DROP OF HEAD - HIPS SLIDE, LEFT SHOULDER PULLS TARGETWARD AND HEAD MOVE FORWARD - WEIGHT PUSHED DOWN INTO LEFT FOOT - RIGHT SHOULDER HIGHER THAN LEFT - CHEST ON TOP OF BELT BUCKLE - LEFT KNEE FLEXED AND FORWARD - PULL OF LEFT SHOULDER CREATES LAG AND IS CRITICAL, CLUB DROPS BEHIND P-6: SHAFT PARALLEL TO GROUND - RIGHT SHOULDER NOW LOWER THAN LEFT - CENTER OF TRIANGLE JUST BEHIND BELT BUCKLE - LEFT HAND ON INSIDE OF RIGHT THIGH - RIGHT HAND IN CENTRE OF RIGHT THIGH - CLUB IN LINE WITH HANDS - TOP OF RIGHT ARM STAYS ON SIDE THOUGHOUT SWING - MAINTAINING LAG, JUST PRIOR TO P-6 ANGLE BETWEEN LEFT ARM AND SHAFT IS 98, LEFT HAND IN MIDDLE OF RIGHT THIGH AND RIGHT HAND ON OUTSIDE OF RIGHT THIGH P-7: IMPACT - FLEXION WITH SPINE TILTING BACK - AT FLEXION HEAD GOES UP - RIGHT BENT LEFT BOWED THROUGH IMPACT PAST LOW POINT - LEFT LEG FLEXED BUT STRAIGHTENING THROUGH IMPACT - POST IMPACT LEFT LEG STRAIGHTENED - LEFT SHOULDER CENTRE OF SWING FULCRUM - EYELINE THROUGH HANDS TO AIMPOINT, AIMING HANDS AT THAT SPOT ON GROUND IN FRONT OF BALL SO EYES LOOK THROUGH HANDS TO AIMPOINT - CENTRE OF HEAD OVER RIGHT KNEE AT IMPACT - LEFT HAND FLAT IN MIDDLE OF LEFT THIGH OVER BENT LEFT KNEE - WEIGHT 90-10 AND RIGHT SHOULDER AT BACK OF RIGHT KNEE - RIGHT HAND BENT AND HALFWAY BETWEEN INSIDE OF RIGHT THIGH AND MIDDLE OF RIGHT THIGH - LOW POINT SHAFT STILL FLEXED, RIGHT WRIST BENT LEFT BOWED - RIGHT WRIST MIDDLE OF LEFT THIGH, LEFT WRIST ON OUTSIDE OF LEFT THIGH P-8: SHAFT PARALLEL TO GROUND - LEFT SHOULDER TO HIP AND ACROSS HIP 82 P-9: RIGHT ARM PARALLEL TO GROUND - RIGHT ARM PARALLEL TO GROUND - FROM 9-10 CLUB CUTS OUT UNDERNEATH LEFT SHOULDER P-10 FINISH - RIGHT SPINE TO HIP, HIP TO TOE 145 - LEFT SPINE TO HIP, HIP TO OUTSIDE OF LEFT FOOT 156 - 95% OF WEIGHT ON LEFT FOOT AT HEEL P4 – TOP P5 – LEFT ARM PARALLEL TO GROUND SIMILAR TO P3 P6 – SHAFT PARALLEL TO TARGET LINE P7 – IMPACT P8 – LEFT ARM PARALLEL TO GROUND P9 – FINISH CENTRIPETAL FORCE NOT CENTRIFUGAL FORCE CENTERED OVER FEET AT ADDRESS RIGHT ELBOW ON RIB CAGE FROM P2 TO P3 FEMER (CENTER OF RIGHT LEG ABOVE KNEE) MOVES 3” FORWARD ON BACK SWING P3 – ELBOWS CLOSE TOGETHER – HIDE RIGHT FOREARM BEHIND RIGHT HAND P4 – LEFT ARM BELOW RIGHT SHOULDER P4 – RIGHT ELBOW ON SHIRT LINE OVER LEFT FOOT TO BEGIN DOWN SWING MOVE BODY FORWARD EYES TRACK TILT AT FINISH
  16. I'm more looking for a swing thought or image in my head to try and ensure I transfer my weight to my front foot during the swing. I don't necessarily care what the back foot actually does as long as I get the weight to the front foot every time I take a full swing.
  17. Not sure why anyone would mention total distance as opposed to carry. Roll is so dependent on course conditions and whether or not you even land on the fairway. You’re one of those egomaniacs who walk around with their doodle out telling everyone how far they drive but secretly include made up roll numbers too dont you? 😜 Ive played many rounds with friends who hit less distance than me off the tee and consistently hit sub 90. They’re better players. Simple. Also, check this out: AND my chip out of trouble back onto the fairway, AND my chip onto the green AND accurate 12 foot lag putt AND 3 foot putt. That’s just one hole. Club selection, target selection, short game, scrambling, putting, chipping, pitching all helped me break 90, which is good for me for my current skill set.
  18. You disagree there is no "Mac Model"? Well you also disagree with Mac, like I said there are CP/CF/Inline patterns. You can call me self proclaimed but your original post has some errors and is missing some important information. CP would be an Inward swing direction (left for a righty), CF would be an Outward swing direction (right for a righty) and Inline would be close to zero swing direction. Each pattern involves components that compliment creating those swing directions. CP is good for hitting low fades or pulls (steep angle of attack) and CF is good for high draws, off the tee/long irons (shallow angle of attack). Big differences are torso tilts (what Mac might call CoG locations), left arm depth at P3/P5, trail arm location at P6. Examples: CP = Alex Noren, CF = Rory McIlroy, Inline = Adam Scott Mike Bender teaches an early version of the CF pattern. Mac tends to favor CP with most students but played CF fades when he played his best. CF is a functional way to play golf, especially with modern equipment, with CP, not so much.
  19. I thought so. And that should be a clue as to why you're wrong. Look, you're into TGM. That's fine, but man, those ideas are outdated. It's great that you can say PP3 and I know what you're talking about, but science has advanced since then. Homer himself would have been interested in the advances, and much of TGM would be very different now had he stayed alive. Think about this: for every action, there's an equal and opposite reaction. By pushing against PP3, which is below the coupling point of the hands, you're actually more likely to THROW AWAY the lag you have. If you hold a club in your hands, how are you going to push at PP3? By flexing the trail wrist and extending the lead wrist. Here's a lead arm and a club shaft. The coupling point is the red dot. If you apply a force at PP3 (where the arrow is pointing), in the direction of the arrow, it will lead to "throwing out the lag." What's the point of that paragraph? I'm honestly asking. Because where I'm coming from, I get to rely on actual data, actual science, physics, math, biomechanics, etc. to know what is actually happening. Then I turn around and teach the "feelings" to people, because nobody's an actual robot, but it certainly helps to discuss what actually happens. That's what I'm doing here. If you're interested in talking about only what something feels like to you, I'm not interested, because I have no idea what something "feels like" to you, and I've had enough students tell me something feels almost the exact opposite of what they're actually DOING that I've settled on how pointless it is to discuss it when not in person. If he actually had a sensor at PP3, he'd find a HUGE variation among Tour players and amongst average players. Of that 96%, some would have a great deal of "lag pressure" at PP3… because that's part of how they THROW away the lag. Look, dude, we're in agreement that lining the shaft up at impact is important. It's Key #3 in the 5 Simple Keys®. But the DST is a visual-only training aid. When swung at any real speed, the bend in the shaft disappears. Simple physics. They don't. A great many of them have more of what you're calling "lag pressure" at impact than PGA Tour players. Science disagrees with your ideas about "lag pressure." How much "lag pressure" do you think Vijay, Freddie, and Phil have in the photos above? How am I able to "lag" the club properly (and release it properly) holding it in just my left hand? Here's how: the arms accelerate, which builds lag, and as the arms (and hands) slow down, the clubhead catches up, lines up, and then overtakes the lead arm. That's it. That's all that really happens in the downswing. There are forces in all directions, too, but while the club shaft is increasing the angle between it and the left arm, there's actually more force on the FRONT of the right hand grip (on Vijay's right index finger) than on PP3, because that's the direction the shaft is trying to move. The hands are slowing down, and the shaft is catching up. I didn't say he flipped. But his left wrist is definitely cupped. It's been measured, and you can see it plain as day in the images I posted. As a result of you reaching full extension before impact. Not remotely accurate. You're flat out wrong here, for reasons I've already explained, and you seem to have completely missed the part where Justin Rose is swinging it and it's straight when he hits it, too. Here's a fact I think you're going to have trouble wrapping your brain around so long as you think PP3 matters like you think it does: the shaft of virtually every PGA Tour player is in FORWARD DEFLECTION at impact. Just physics, man. This has been observed, explained, measured, captured, etc. It's a fact.
  20. As far as I know, I've always done that. Its certainly in every video I've posted, going back to the Spring of 2017, but its in no way intentional. One thing is pretty certain, that foot wouldn't slip out if it had much weight on it, so its an indication that most of my weight has moved to the forward foot already (a good thing). As for whether it causes any problems, I don't know. Its certainly not on the list of things that @iacas has recommended that I change, so its not on the top of any list of priorities for me right now.
  21. No. Fred Couples had a cupped lead wrist at impact (still does). Jordan Spieth and Lee Westwood do/did too. Plenty of great ball strikers have had arched left wrists, too. You're buying into some old ways of thinking that have been disproven as accurate. We know quite a bit about the actual forces that exist in the golf swing, when and where they're in play, etc. And again, Vijay, Freddie, Phil, and many, many other PGA Tour players actually have the trail hand almost completely off the club at impact. I can make a swing with a ton of lag without the trail hand being on the club at all. They all did/do what? You've not actually said anything. It is. The club shaft straightens out when you swing it at a certain speed. I have video of Justin Rose swinging one on the range at the Memorial in Ohio. Guess what? The club shaft is straight at impact. Simple physics. VISUALLY. It doesn't actually, nor could you actually see the shaft at impact when you're swinging it. Good swing on the right, bad one on the left. The shaft is straight for both. The DST is a visual-only training aid. It gives you the idea of what and where your hands should be at impact, but… that's of limited use in my experience, because nobody can actually see/feel exactly where their hands are at impact on a shot.
  22. @DaveP043 Have you always allowed your back foot to slide or lift up during the contact through follow-through portion of the swing? Does doing this cause you any problems? I personally have a problem where I keep reverting to a swing problem where I don't get enough weight transferred to the front foot during the swing. It comes back every spring. I fix it for a while during the golf season and play solid golf, but then all of a sudden it comes back and I have to train it away again. I played nine last night and focused on making sure my back foot slid forward on the follow through like this to ensure weight transfer was happening and liked the results. I'm tempted to try and make this part of my swing, so wanted to see if you purposely do this, and if it causes you any other problems. Thank you.
  23. So I'm confused on the head movement. I've seen it said over and over about keeping the head still but I've noticed lots of players not only move it a few inches or so going back but then it moves even further back on the downswing into impact. For instance, this swing of Justin Thomas. His head moves way back at impact from where it was at address. I see other pros do this too though maybe not as much as he does. I drew lines to show address and impact. His head is way back from where it started. Now this is with a driver so I'm not sure that factors into it? I've seen an iron swing from him and it moves back some but not as much as this...maybe an inch back from where it was. It pretty much just stays back.
  24. HUH? I've been playing this frigging game for 50+ years! Don't even try to tell me that I don't know what "feel ain't real" means! Back in the day I shot par and sub par golf, so I know what "feels" are! And I understand the "concept" of keep your trail arm straight. I tried that for a while, and it did not work for me! I understand that it tries to increase the radius of my swing, But I made inconsistent contact with the ball, and really had no idea where it was going. I grew up, and was instructed, in the "keep your right elbow close to your side", "tuck a knotted towel under your right armpit, and don't let it fall out in your backswing" era! That is how I learned to play golf. The second to last time we played, I tried a practice swing on the tee like that, and it felt pretty good! I striped my drive right down the middle. The last time we played, I employed the same swing, and shot a 78! The first time I've broken 80 in a while! My swing felt so much more "connected" and together, I started hitting the ball dead in the center of the clubface, right on line, and for good distance. I guess what I'm saying here is that old dogs find it hard to learn new tricks!
  25. I've been playing around with my chipping lately, moving away from going into the ball steep with the concept of hitting the ball first and then the ground to impacting the ball with a more neutral/vertical club position, bruising the bottom of the club along the ground just before impacting the ball and giving more margin for error. Essentially a more putting type stroke, resulting in less chunked and bladed shots. I'm in two minds about what the trail arm is meant to do. Should it be staying straight or staying at a locked angle for the duration of the shot or should the elbow be folding on the back swing like a more fuller shot? Thanks
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