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Handicap Index

Found 70 results

  1. My swing has been wildly inconsistent and all over the place. So I decided to take a lesson from my local golf shop. In the 10 years I have been playing golf I have taken a few lessons, of course it has been with 3 different people. The problem with golf instructors is that they don't seem to stick around for long. Teacher 1 taught me about rolling my wrists through to generate head speed. Teacher 2 taught me about keeping my left foot a bit out and weight forward, he also tried to change my baseball grip to interlocking grip. Teacher 3 instructed me to keep my weight 60 right-40 left. the other changes #3 made were to keep my head behind the ball and to swing effortlessly using the open door-close door method. He loosened up my right arm and winged out my left (beach ball between arms). Teacher 3 was right about my swing, I am wasting a lot of energy and working too hard. Having years of baseball behind my I swing for the fences, with my swing straight back and coming all the way to the top and than over my head, like John Daly only with super stiff arms. I break my wrists at the top and as someone noted during my last round "you grunt like a women tennis player"! I have to say the open door close door swing worked well, I was no longer shanking the ball and was actually intentionally drawing it. My swing is much smoother and I hitting balls with ease and there is little thought in my backswing as to all the movements that can potentially falter! However, I lost nearly 20 yards on my carry for all clubs and my back is sore from my new posture. I am sure once I start working on my swing and get used to it, I can regain some yards. But it feels soon awkward. I know the voice in my head tells me you paid for the instructions, you sought help, listen to it! But at what point do you take something new and adapt it to make it comfortable to where you could use it? Or do you stay the new course?
  2. A simple way to simulate the Golf Course pressure on the driving range... Follow these steps to simulate the pressure of the course on the driving range. Step ONE: After your regular stretches, warm up with 12-15 shots. Hit these shots with a relatively short iron. Small swing with a slightly assertive routine. Step TWO: Use FOUR golf clubs. Long, medium-long, mid and short. A good combo will be as follows: 9-iron, 7-iron, 5-iron, FW-wood OR driver, 4-iron, 6-iron, 8-iron. Step THREE: Make groups of golf balls as pictured above: 4-3-2-1. Step FOUR: Hit four shots with the shortest club (9-iron). Three shots with the mid-club (7-iron). Two shots with the med-long club (5-iron) and lastly one shot with the long club (FW-wood). It is 10 shots covering various distances. Get the percentage and be true to yourself. 70% is a great result! Why? Note the following… The shorter shots are ‘easier’ as it is clearly an easier club to hit than the 5-iron. So make these shots count and make sure you get on the scoreboard here. You’ll need it later. By the time you get to the last three shots you are hitting more difficult shots and you feel that pressure, as on the course. Also, on the course you are hitting the very long clubs a lot less than the mid and shorter clubs. This simple drill simulates all of that and you are actually practicing with a purpose. Remember to go through your whole routine before every shot. It’s all about taking the course to the range, not the other way around! Go for a specific target and be honest with yourself. Does the shot count or not? This form of practice also takes time, so you are not wasting time by hitting shot after shot and practicing mistakes!
  3. I don't know what it is, but in gusty winds (15-20 mph sustained, gusts in the 25+ range) I'll hit a great shot, I'll hit it very well... And the wind just have it's way with it.... Any tips on playing on windy gusty days? Thanks.
  4. Hey everyone! I have always enjoyed golfing but have never have done particulary well at long range driving. I don't want to spend tons on clubs so my thought was what balls will carry better and travel better for this? I have researched some aspects of this problem I have had and stumbled upon this site: http://www.grumpygopher.com/10-best-golf-balls-distance/ What is your take on it? Do you think these balls are legit and actually do carry better or do I just need to get my swing going better? Or both? Are these balls as effective with short range putting too? I'd love to know your thoughts
  5. This will be an odd post to write, and I'm going to ask for some leeway in how you interpret it to give me the benefit of the doubt. This is not a rant, I'm not upset, and this is not aimed at anyone in particular. I, more than anyone else, am aware of my flaws and limitations, and unaware of much of what other people do, and I recognize that. I also stand by the work I've done here on TST, with my students, and with the various other things I've done over the years - training a hundred or so instructors in 5SK, writing a book and making a Lowest Score Wins DVD, the work, time, and energy I've put into traveling to work with experts in biomechanics and other hard sciences, the money I've spent getting "toys" and conducting my own research with them, and so on. Give me a little benefit of the doubt that my mood in writing this is perhaps best described as "mildly disappointed but not at all surprised." That post struck me as appropriate. It's in a thread where @Phil McGleno was responding to @Marty2019 re: Paul Wilson, how much you use your arms and wrists (and how) in the golf swing, etc. While I remain almost 100% convinced that @Marty2019 is "wrong" with his own theory about how he doesn't use his arms as more than connecting his body to the club… (while simultaneously understanding that if that's what he feels he's doing it's a completely different thing altogether)… he's not really going to a chemist and arguing with a pet theory over a chemical reaction. This is true simply because there is no universally accepted truth in golf instruction like we have in basic chemistry. @Marty2019 could cite several other "chemists" that back his theory - "chemists" with years of experience, YouTube videos, DVDs perhaps, websites of their own, and thousands of students. Because there's no rigorous testing or scientific process to determine when someone is a "golf expert," golfers have to rely mostly on perception: does the person seem like they know what they're talking about? Unfortunately, too often, that test fails, simply because it's pretty easy to fall into the trap of something that sounds logical. A charismatic instructor can make you believe a lot of things are true or beneficial when they are not. Add in a dash of golfers who secretly hope to find "the secret" or "that one tip" that will put them over the top, and you have a recipe for disaster: a golfer who will spend time, money, and energy chasing the dream of finally being able to break 80, or par, or hit the ball 270 yards, or sink every putt they look at, or whatever… What can I do about it? Not a whole lot, except to keep trying to hold myself to a high standard, and to educate as many people about the standard to which they should hold their instructor to as well. Golf is not in the age of chemistry, it's still - unfortunately - more like the days of alchemy.
  6. Hey Everybody, I'm a newbie to the site, but I'm loving the content thus far. I decided I would go ahead and post my swing to see what kind of feedback y'all had. I've been shooting in the mid to high 80's recently but trying to drop a few strokes and break 80 before the year is over. I've been Playing Golf for: 5 years My current handicap index or average score is: Mid 80's My typical ball flight is: High Slight Fade The shot I hate or the "miss" I'm trying to reduce/eliminate is: Slice with drive or pull with my irons Videos: Thanks, Jonathan
  7. It's July, that means it's becoming time for me to prove myself amongst others. The Newman Club Championship is. July 16-17, TST Outing on the 23rd, and the Ithaca City Golf Championship is August 27, 28 and Sept 3, 4 and 5. I've been playing ok lately... But not great... Pure B Flight here... I won't be winning the championship flight... Or probably the first flight... (I won't shoot a good enough first round) But I'm playing pretty well... Just need to eliminate the brain fart doubles I sometimes make. And the other bad swings I sometimes make. Basically if I play well in these tournaments and at the outings. I will be happy... Simply put.
  8. Recently my consistency with my shorter clubs has gotten better. 7-iron down to the 54° wedge has been much more predictable... My distances have been very good for the most part... I'm not fearing much from 75-160 yards... I hit it very well. I do have issues missing greens with 7 and 8 irons... But it's not by much typically. My longer clubs 4w, 3h, 4i, 5i and 6i need a lot of work... But that will come around soon I hope... If anyone has any suggestions on my longer clubs let me know... I'll get some video up so you can see if there is anything I can fix.
  9. Golf backswing tips - I have found a great video wich I wanted to share with you guys. It explains very well how to practice a nice backswing drill. http://www.golfchannel.com/media/golf-fix-making-correct-backswing/ When you hit with a driver it is very important that the movement comes from your shoulders and not from your hands. Le the traingle of your shoulders and arms be intact by making a slow turn. Find a ritm that is contrallable and move from there backwards, to your top position. The movement backwards has to be synchroon.
  10. Good Morning Golfers, I've been thinking a lot about the mental side of golf these days and have realized there is not nearly enough content available on routine building, head mechanics and analytical vs. creative mental training as it relates to amateur/professional golf and pressure situations. Although golf is a passion of mine, my background is not in golf. My experiences with mental game training and weapon sports are from playing pool. Being a journey man road player for many years, mental training became more and more important as I progressed as a player. For instance, analytical thought and execution during play with regards to stroke mechanics, is a players worst enemy (at least in pool it is). It is impossible to play at a high level while thing about changes in your stroke or even thinking about your stroke period. Thats why a pre-shot routine is so important in getting your head out of the stroke while performing at a top level. Especially in competition, whether it be tournament play or other pressure situations (I.e, gambling)... My question to you is, what would be a beneficial and entertaining show on the mental game of golf? I'm not talking about speaking to mental coaches or sports psychologists (because that shit is boring), but rather speaking with high level tour pro's and mini-tour amateur's about their experiences in pressure situations where mental training, or lack there of, has either saved or killed an opportunity. Also, what could be done to avoid/ exacerbate failures or successes? What mental or physical routines have been used, whether it be eye patterns, visualization, breathing, swing thoughts and mechanical process, to bring ones mind to peak acuity during competition. What media format would be most beneficial to an amateur player or even an advanced mini-tour player when it comes to learning more about the mental side of golf while in an entertaining setting? For instance a Feherty for strictly stories on mental successes or failures in the game of golf. Let me know your thoughts on this! Maybe I'm way to far out in left field but I would find it very beneficial and entertaining to hear from guys like Kevin Na on mental successes and failures and what causes them. Thanks!! Uncle Tony
  11. IttiAfter a month and about 9 rounds, I've got a lot to work on. My long game is just OK, my alignment sucks, and 100 yards and in needs a lot of work... I'm hoping to shave a 3-5 strokes by the Club Championship in July, the outing the week after, and the Ithaca City Championship the last week in August and over Labor Day weekend. So I've developed a practice plan to work on this. 1) Alignment: In the past I've had no pre-shot routine. I've watched a few videos on alignment and think I've found something to try, I think it might work... But it's a little different and might take a bit of getting used to. 2) 100 yards and in: my GW goes 110 yards with a full swing. My Main issue is 50-100 yards. 50 and in is pretty good but not great which will be worked on as well. However, 25 yards and in, I just need to work on proximity to the hole. I need more short putts for pars to make more pars. 3) My game planning needs a little work... On some holes it's great I have few issues. Par 3s I'm struggling with. I'm having trouble just shooting for the center of the green. I go flag hunting sometimes and it costs me dearly. My goal is to average around 80 when the tournaments come around... I have a long way to go to become Scratch by 2020.
  12. I went to a site to buy some instructional content. I couldn't believe it when I didn't see https - that's the green padlock - that indicates encryption is being used. There is no way I'm buying your stuff over the internet if you're not using the https protocol.
  13. As a 29 year old, who has played this game for nearly 20 years now, I've been steadily getting better at this game over the years. I actually had a stretch where I was a lower single digit handicap (around a 4 or 5), but I got into a bad car accident, while riding with a friend in 2010. I'm lucky to be alive, but I lost a ton of speed and was out of golf for 8 months. When I came back, I struggled to get any kind of distance, and really struggled to score. After 2 years, I finally started to feel well enough, after a bunch of physical therapy to have some speed back. I still was only able to swing 3/4 of the way back... Toward the middle of 2014, I started to not feel pain with a swing to almost parallel, I couldn't quite get it there, without a jolt of pain, but slowly with more PT I did. Finally, after 5+ years I am pain-free on the golf course. I can actually make a full swing without getting a jolt of pain. Even with all the pain and physical therapy, Somehow I carry a 10.1 Handicap Index. Recently, I realized something. If I want to be a scratch player, I have a long way to go. I need to put in some 5 Simple Keys work. My first two keys are pretty solid, Key #3 I'm working on, with small successes, making good progress on. Keys 4 and 5, I'll have to get down if I want to be scratch. My putting isn't the worst, when I remember to not look at the result from shorter distance, I'd like to break even on the greens, meaning average the expected number of putts from all distances. My inside 60 yard game is better in the sense, when I'm short sided, I just make sure I get it on the green and have a putt from my next shot. There is very little 2nd greenside shots anymore, I make sure I have a putt for par. I have very very few penalty strokes now, but I seem to have a blow-up hole that kills my momentum... then I'll play a four or five hole stretch in 6 or 7 over, instead of getting over the triple, and refocusing. I want to thank you all for reading this... and for the friendly atmosphere of the site.
  14. Every golfer has the thought at some point.. "If only I could consistently shoot in the 70s, then I would enjoy golf more." We get lost in our heads, dreaming of a fantasy where golf was one day an easy game. What if we didn't have to worry about water hazards, sand, or OB? What if 3-footers didn't bring us anxiety? What if we could enjoy that pure strike that we long for on every single shot? I'd argue that the better a golfer gets, the more enjoyable the game is. But.. not in the way that most golfers imagine. In this post, I will be examining our love affair with golf, how we can enjoy the failures that the game inevitably brings us, and why golf will never get easier (but can become more enjoyable). Why Do We Love Golf? What is fun about slicing a golf ball into the window of a house, or duffing a chip into the bunker? If you're a bit more experienced, what is fun about making a triple bogey on the last hole to shoot 82? Even at the highest levels, what is fun about missing a 5 footer to make the cut in a big tournament? Golf is a game of heartbreak. For every great shot, there are five bad shots. You will fail by most standards 99% of the time. You might spend hours on the driving range, and perform worse the next day. If you hit one shot in the wrong place, your entire round could turn for the worse. So why?? Someone explain to me why we love this game so much?? From another perspective, it does feel amazing to hit a pitch shot off tight turf, watch it bounce short of the hole, spin, and stop an inch from the cup. It also feels rather pleasing to hit a low stinger down the middle of the fairway on a tight par 4. Heck, it even feels great to make that dead straight 3-footer on the last hole to shoot 72! In reality, our love affair with golf comes from something completely out of our control. In pyschology, this external force is called "operant conditioning." More specifically, as we practice golf, our behavior is being reinforced on a "variable-ratio" schedule of reinforcement. In psychological terms, this means that our behavior (hitting another golf ball) is reinforced after an unpredictable amount of responses (you never know when that "pure" strike is going to come). This reinforcement schedule is often noted as producing a high and steady rate of response (why you can't get yourself to stop hitting golf balls). What you might not realize is that this type of operant conditioning is seen in one of the most addictive activities known to man... Gambling. Just like we pull the lever on the slot machine over and over, waiting for the symbols to line up, we also stand on the driving range, hitting ball after ball, waiting for that "pure strike" to happen. In other words, we are literally addicted to golf. Fortunately, golf is quite a productive and healthy behavior! But like all addictions, it can take control of us sometimes, and we find ourselves wishing it was the other way around. How can we improve our games to the point where golf doesn't take control of us? Wouldn't we enjoy it more if bad rounds and bad shots didn't bother us so much? How to Love this Brutal Game If you have read any number of golf books, business books, goal setting books, etc., then you understand what "the process" is. I know how redundant it may sound, but "the process" is the key to enjoying this game AND being successful at it. In our society, external outcomes are praised. We chase after these desires like mad men, and then when we finally achieve them, there is only a brief moment of satisfaction. Golf is no different. Each and every one of us are striving for a better game, and often have a specific level that we would like to reach. It might be breaking 90 for the first time, breaking 80 for the first time, or even winning a competitive tournament for the first time. Unfortunately, in the midst of these desires, we find ourselves judging every single shot we hit, every single score we post, what others think of us, and even becoming self critical during practice. In the end, where the ball lands, what score we shoot, and what our handicap becomes are not in our direct control. They are external to us. They aren't part of the process, and therefore will not produce lasting satisfaction if we choose to focus on them. The process is something more elusive, complex, and demanding. So What is "The Process?" In order to truly love golf and improve your game, you must dedicate yourself to a mindset that is common among elite performers. And that mindset is one that doesn't fear failure. It is a mindset that enjoys the process more than the results. Finally, it is a mindset that falls in love with endless improvement Notice that I did not mention anything about shooting good rounds of golf, winning tournaments, or beating your buddies on the weekend. All of these things are out of your control, and will be products of an effective process. Instead, you must focus on what you CAN control, and then TRUST that your preparation will produce the results that you so desire. By adopting this care-free (not care-less) attitude, those bad shots, bad rounds, and negative thoughts won't seem so damaging. Remember, the number on the scorecard is your compass. It tells you where you are pointing at the moment, but certainly does not require you to keep moving in that direction. If you shoot a high score, that simply means you have some thinking, learning, and practice to do. Nothing else. Making up an irrational story in your mind about your lack of skill as a golfer is a waste of time and mental energy. When you notice that you have started to think in a destructive way, simply bring yourself back into the moment, take a deep breath, and move on. Remember, golf is just a game. If you can understand this concept, you WILL enjoy golf more, and you WILL improve. Does Golf Ever Get Easier? You might look at the pros on T.V., and think to yourself: "If I could hit it like that, golf would be easy." What you don't realize is that each of these professionals is grinding over every shot, whether you see it in their eyes or not. Sure, they are more confident off the tee than 99.9% of the world's golfers, but that doesn't mean that golf is "easy" for them. Just like your home course provides you with challenges, the USGA/R&A provides these tour pros with challenges such as long rough, lightning fast greens, and humiliating pin placements. Rather than wishing golf to be easier, why not learn how to enjoy the challenge more? As a golfer who has shot 64 all the way to 104, I have a general understanding of what each stage of the game feels like. From my experience, if you focus on the process, and fall in love with continuous improvement, golf does become more enjoyable. Think about it in terms of money. In the book "Happy Money" by Michael Norton and Elizabeth Dunn, the authors report that once the average household reaches a minimum threshold of income ($75,000 in the U.S.), they experience a greater satisfaction with life. As the household increases over this threshold, happiness no longer correlates with rising income. For most people, golf is the same. Once you reach a certain skill level (usually when you can break 90 consistently), golf does become more enjoyable. At this point, you are able to get off the tee, keep the ball in play, and make a few putts here and there. Unfortunately, everything past this level becomes pure desire, and will inevitably bring a golfer frustration more often than not. So what are you to do after passing this satisfactory level of skill? Are you doomed for the rest of your golf career? Certainly not! You are just going to have to focus less on results, and more on the things you can control. Golf is enjoyable as long as you constantly seek ways to refine your process. Bad scores don't matter given you focus on improving your method of preparation and mindset rather than your score. Sure, there will be brief times where you might feel the game slipping. At these times, ask yourself what things you can control. Focus on the process. Be ambitious, yet detached from the results. Do something every day to improve. If you do these things, golf will remain the most difficult game known to man, but you will enjoy it. What do you think? Why do YOU love golf?
  15. That comes from the behind-the-scenes peek from the famous Time interview with Tiger Woods: http://scoregolf.com/blog/lorne-rubenstein/the-goods-on-woods/ . Tiger, it turns out, is wrong. The golf swing is too fast. Even if you could instantly form a thought and direct your muscles to do something, it quite literally takes too long for the nerve impulse to travel from your brain to your muscles for it to do anything past about A5. That's right: if your brain hasn't told your muscles to do something by A5 (or when your lead arm is parallel to the ground on the downswing), it ain't even gonna begin happening prior to impact. Several biomechanists and neurologists agree.
  16. I've been Playing Golf for: 12 years My current handicap index or average score is: Handicap: 2 My typical ball flight is: High The shot I hate or the "miss" I'm trying to reduce/eliminate is: Left I am trying to gain a bit more clubhead speed and just need some overall help for any fixes people can see and comments :) Videos:
  17. Product Name: "The Navigator" by Dirty Larry GolfProduct Type: Putting Training AidProduct Website: https://www.dirtylarrygolf.com/buy-best-putting-aids/Cost: $50 to 60 Ratings (out of 5): Quality: 5 Value: 3 Effectiveness:4.5 Durability: 4.5 Esthetic Appeal: 5 Link to Discussion Thread My Member Review I had the opportunity to review both The Navigator and a competing product which allowed me to focus on the similarities and differences each offers. I will not provide any details regarding the other product, but this review will have what I feel are the main differentiators between the products. Pros Customizable: Both in the colors it comes in and how you choose to use it. Adjustability: It has several joints that allow it to be positioned to best suit your eyes Quality: This is a well made product Cons Cost: This is a fairly expensive training aid for what it is Effort: This one requires a fair bit of effort to use, you have to tighten it on the putter, then add the guide bars Size: Although you could ditch the box and store in a baggie, the box is also part of the setup Review When I first received it I was very impressed, the packaging is first rate and screams all-american. The setup is very straightforward and the included instructions are good. I've always been a feel putter, I never use the line on the golf ball or putter, but rather just visualize where I want the putt to go. I will pick a spot between the ball and the hole where I want to hit. This training aid helps to provide better alignment as you can pick your spot, aim and setup to putt then while holding the putter rotate around to check to see where it's actually pointing. This is much harder to do without an alignment aid. The Navigator comes with two metal pointers which are different lengths and can be used in either position which allows the short end to be in front or behind the putter head. I prefer to have the short end forward and found the best results using it that way. Overall this is a high quality putting aid that would provide benefit to most that use it. I do think it's a better option when you have a dedicated puting area or when you are planning to do a long putting practice session as it is not a quick process to mount it to your putter. I look forward to continuing to use this and to improve my aiming ability.
  18. JonMA1

    Stepping It Up

    Earlier in the season, I started a thread about how to deal with ability - or lack of. (http://thesandtrap.com/forums/topic/81404-hitting-a-plateau-with-ability/#comment-354724). What I was after was more enjoyment out of what has become a very big part of my life. As is the case with many of my thoughts and opinion on golf, the idea that I can learn to be ok with a crappy game was mostly wrong. While I must learn to accept the current skill level at which I play, it’s difficult to suppress expectations on the course, and practice efforts off. So, where the hell do I go from here? I Still believe continuous lessons are the best way for improvement. I like the idea of taking lessons in person. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be instructors in this state - much less the area - who share a similar teaching methodology and philosophy as Erik and Mike. I do believe in choosing a system and sticking with it. Earlier this year, I took a single lesson from a local PGA pro. I had spoke with him a few times and got a feel for his methods, which I immediately liked. I loaned my copy of LSW to him. He was very positive about what he read, which indicated he wasn’t completely set in his ways. So we worked out a lesson where he would watch me play nine holes, then give me a priority piece to work on. While he did give me some pointers on the short game (which were great BTW), for the most part, he sat back and observed my full swing without commenting. At the end of 9 holes, he told me the one thing I needed to work on was keeping my head angled UP more at address. The reason being that I wasn’t allowing room for my left should to come around which was causing my head to move. Ok… well that’s completely opposite of what I’ve learned. Maybe I’d been overdoing it all this time, so I made a slight change (not to the extent he recommended) and the results were not all bad. The next time I showed up at the course, he asked how the priority piece was working and we talked about another lesson. He told me he was going to show me how to roll my hands to draw the ball. While I really like this instructor, his views on swing mechanics seem different than what I’ve learned here. Even though lessons are probably the best way to show real improvement, it’s not always easy finding the right instructor. As it turns out, my budget wouldn’t allow for a series of lessons anyway, so that made the decision pretty easy. While this isn’t the only reason I don’t take lessons, it's likely the most impactful. Lessons aren’t a cure-all. Besides the issues of money, and the lack of good instruction, there’s my inability to understand not only what is being taught, but how to apply it. When it comes to learning, but this it’s not easy. Applying drills to a slow swing, and a slow swing to a full speed swing is very difficult. If I’m going to improve my game, I’ll first have to improve how I practice. How to turn successes into second-nature habits. What good is learning the best swing mechanics in the world when they will inevitably be forgotten? What seems to be common with better players, is they have no more than a single swing thought during a swing, while I’m trying to remember everything that I think has worked in the past - just before I push the shot OOB. I don’t know how successful I’ll be at any of these, they’re just thoughts. It’s not like typing out and posting them is some guarantee they’ll get accomplished or even attempted. Plus, I’ve been wrong so many times over the last few years on what I thought was necessary towards improvement, that I’m kind of at a loss. All I know is that playing well is so much more enjoyable that playing poorly.
  19. I attended the Division III ECAC championship this past weekend. And I saw a lot of quadruple bogeys. On a relatively wide open golf course. It made no sense to me. None. This golf course was not that difficult, and the vast majority of the big scores were from two simple errors: Being far too aggressive at the wrong times.Making utterly horrible swings.For the first, I mean stuff like this: you hit the ball in a fairway bunker, and have a 4-iron left to the green. Rather than hitting it out short and left where there's 80 yards of space and taking your chances on pitching it up on the green, I watched a player flare one right into some tall grass from which he couldn't find his ball. So, he replayed the shot… and did almost the same exact thing. He found his ball, played out short and left (throwing milkweed pods everywhere), pitched on, and two-putted. For the second, I'm just talking about shots that are so horrible they don't even really have names. You can't do anything but stare at them as they sail 40° right, or pull-hook so violently you turn around in case it boomerangs back at you. Just get rid of those shots. Where do they even come from? How does a guy who can shoot 75 one day hit three of those shots the next day? I have no idea, but if you occasionally hit one, figure out what causes it and eliminate it immediately. You can't avoid Black Death and you can't avoid penalty strokes if you have a big miss that creeps up into your play now and then. On that point, Hank Haney is right.
  20. hey guys i was just wondering what is the best training aid out there to cure a slice? I make good contact with the ball but i cant get rid of my slice.
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