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Handicap Index

Found 10 results

  1. GAME GOLF has recently announced a new version of their shot tracking system and they are calling it GAME GOLF Pro http://articles.gamegolf.com/new-game-golf-pro-offers-unprecedented-shot-tracking-for-golfers-37381/ Some of the major highlights from the article: Taking advantage of the industry’s most advanced shot-tracking technology is this easy: arrive at the tee, turn on GAME GOLF PRO and play. Unlike earlier iterations, there’s no need to tap the GAME GOLF tags on your clubs to the hip device. All you have to do is play golf—and every shot, distance, and club used is automatically tracked. Incorporating automotive-grade sensors used by cutting edge motor companies such as Tesla, GAME GOLF PRO is so smart that it can differentiate real shots from practice swings. GAME GOLF PRO also doesn’t miss any shots and you don’t need to have your phone in your pocket, unlike competing systems. In fact, GAME GOLF PRO has its own battery and GPS included so you can leave your phone at home saving you data and battery life, if you choose. Coming to market in 2018, GAME GOLF Smart Caddie helps golfers make data-driven decisions by recommending clubs and hole strategy based on your previously tracked performance. Competing systems give you a recommendation for how to play a hole. Smart Caddie takes it one step further, providing you with recommendations for every shot you face on a hole with no manual entry required. Smart Caddie can even calculate the effect of weather and elevation in making its recommendation. Designed with the input of PGA of America Golf Professionals, the new GAME GOLF Coaching Dashboard not only allows you to accurately determine the parts of your game that need improvement, but it also makes it easy to share your data with your PGA Professional. GAME GOLF INTELLIGENCE puts a new spin on the GAME Golf tag line of ‘Know Your Game.’ GAME GOLF INTELLIGENCE provides the golf industry with a tool it can use to lower maintenance costs, increase pace of play, improve course set-up and playability, and make courses safer. “By drawing on our database of more than two-million rounds and twenty-billion data points—the richest source of tracked rounds golf—GAME GOLF INTELLIGENCE makes it possible for course owners, club management, superintendents and golf architects to respond to how golfers are actually experiencing their course,” McGuire said. Personally I like the tagging in my GAME GOLF Live unit, and it is part of my preshot routine and it acts as my "go" trigger to execute my shot. With GAME GOLF Pro I feel like it would always be in the back of my mind "I wonder if the unit tagged that shot or not" but with the current unit, I get the beep/vibration to know it tagged the shot One of the highlights from the article states, "you don’t need to have your phone in your pocket, unlike competing systems. In fact, GAME GOLF PRO has its own battery and GPS included so you can leave your phone at home saving you data and battery life, if you choose." With my current GAME GOLF Live unit, I dont have to have my phone in my pocket in order to tag the shots. Since getting the belt clip and tags, I am no longer on my phone during my rounds. I just edit the round on my phone after before I leave the course. Also, someone correct me if I'm wrong, but a feature like the Smart Caddie is not allowed in tournament play, correct?
  2. My shoulder isn't 100% and it's going to rain, but f*** it I'm going golfing tomorrow.

    1. nevets88

      nevets88

      Go for it!

  3. keysus

    My Swing (Keysus)

    I hit a big slice with my driver. I cannot figure out if it is because of one of the following or something I do not know about: - Swinging over the top - Swinging with my arms instead of my body - Club face, very offline with hands halfway through backswing - Something else Please let me know what you think. I've been Playing Golf for: 4 years My current handicap index or average score is: 90s My typical ball flight is: 260 The shot I hate or the "miss" I'm trying to reduce/eliminate is: slice
  4. Q. Does anyone besides me use a Zepp Trainer? If so, what feature do you find most useful????
  5. @Fairway_CY was brave enough to be a guinea pig for an idea to analyze his game, with the goal being that we amateurs can combine aspects of GAME GOLF (GG) and Lowest Score Wins (LSW) to map out a course for better golf. Here was the first effort: https://thesandtrap.com/b/the_numbers_game/deep_dive_analysis_cy Keep in mind, I'm not a trained statistician (or in any way connected to a profession related to golf!), so the idea is to see how we laymen can make sense of our own games, using tools at our disposal. Even better when those tools (GG/LSW) are ones that are popular here on TST. While Erik will surely review the articles to make sure they're not going to detract from his LSW brand, the main idea was to mostly do see what we amateurs can come up with ourselves. Erik should always feel free to chime in and tell us we have gone a bit astray with the direction we've taken the analysis, of course. I make no claim to be omniscient, and I can frequently head the wrong direction with where I think the numbers are taking me. My hope is that he (and Dave, of course) will get some gratification seeing people apply the analysis in the book for real-world examples. If you're interested in being a subject of a future article, let me know. I've had one person volunteer after CY. The priority for me (for the first few, anyway- that could change after feedback) will be someone who needs significant improvement- maybe bogey golf or worse. The person needs to have read LSW and to have at least 8 very representative rounds accurately recorded in GG (typically requiring moving your shots and pin locations). For example: Initial putts should be extremely accurate, and All other shots should be reflected to a decent level. The golfer should be someone with longevity here on the site and who appears to be on a trajectory that shows a desire to improve. Some humility and a sense of humor help too! Another hope is to come back next season after we find our strides in the season and do a follow-up on the same golfers to see if the improvement plan has helped. If so, where were the strokes shaved? Are the analysis and plan holding up? Any other feedback on the direction of the feature is welcome, of course. If you read the first article linked above, feel free to help me figure out what to cut out, what to supplement with. This is meant to evolve to be useful and right-to-the-heart-of-the-matter stuff. I'll try to limit fluff in the write-ups. The first one was long, admittedly. Thanks in advance.
  6. MySwing Golf Launches Major Software Update Scottsdale, AZ (November 16, 2016) — MySwing Golf, Inc., the world’s leading full-body 3D motion capture analysis system for the golf swing, has announced the launch of its newest and most sophisticated software package. The software is now available for download to all existing MySwing customers. The key upgrades with the new software include biofeedback, which uses both audio and visual cues, that allows coaches to share instant swing feedback with their students; and a report comparing a student’s swing to tour ranges, allowing instructors to quickly focus on one or two major swing issues and provide a quick evaluation to the student. Instructors can add comments to this report and share it with their students via PDF. In addition, there are a variety of 3D planes and a new 3D wrist view. “Students learn much faster if they can both see and feel what their instructor wants them to do rather than the instructor forcing the player into a certain position,” said MySwing Director of Product Development, Chase Cooper. “Our goal with MySwing is to be as visual and user friendly as possible. Forcing instructors and their students to look at and understand graphs really isn’t the right approach.” The MySwing Professional product is the only wireless 3D system that is portable and can be used indoors as well as outdoors for a real-time teaching experience. According to Cooper, the MySwing Pro state-of-the-art system takes golf instruction to a new level. “Golf instructors have two goals: improve their students and increase revenue. With this new software release, we will help them accomplish both.” For more information about MySwing Golf, visit www.myswing.com. Now then… I wanted to start a thread on the MySwing. The software and everything was a little rough the last time @david_wedzik and I checked it out at the PGA Show last year, but I'm curious about the improvements they've made. I'll talk with Chuck (Evans) about it, as he's been using it for awhile, and I know others who have a system as well. Generally speaking, I tend to like technology but not like it when it requires doing too much different than regular golf. For example, the K-Vest was cool and all… but it was an actual vest and took some strapping in and all that. Time that is sometimes better spent, plus, the golfer didn't "feel" like they were playing golf, they felt like they were in an experiment. The MySwing is fairly non-intrusive.
  7. Steven001

    My Swing (Steven001)

    I've been Playing Golf for: On and off for about 9 years. I haven't played consistently for about 5 years and not at all for the last two. I've got the bug again and I've played 4 rounds in the last month. My current handicap index or average score is: I would estimate around 20 My typical ball flight is: To the right/occasional pull The shot I hate or the "miss" I'm trying to reduce/eliminate is: Slice! With the occasional pull to the left. I think I struggle to "release" the club properly prior to impact and come slightly over the top. I can also see that my right elbow is fairly bent which I'm guessing is causing my club face to be open at impact? I'm hoping someone will be able to give me some tips or advice on how to correct my bad habit! Videos:
  8. Russellchr1

    My Swing (Russellchr1)

    Hey guys and Gals, Just wanting to see if I could get some feedback on my swing and hopefully get some takeaways on drills to fix the issues you see. I have recently started playing and love the game. Any tips would be greatly appreciated. I've been Playing Golf for: 2 months My current average score is: 95 My typical ball flight is: Left to RIght The shot I hate or the "miss" I'm trying to reduce/eliminate is: Hard Slice and Hard Hook. Videos:
  9. I've written before about how golfers don't seem to understand losing or gaining partial shots. We can't ever hit a shot that counts as only half or three tenths of a shot, after all. A missed five-foot putt counts the same as a drive we pure 285 down the middle. So, I'd like to take a few minutes here to cover partial shots and work our way toward "strokes gained" or lost as it applies to golfers of all levels - including you. The simplest way of looking at strokes gained and partial shots is with putting. From one inch away, every golfer in the world is expected to take 1.0 strokes to hole out. Nobody ever two-putts, nobody three-putts, etc. The same is pretty much true from one foot away, as well: virtually everyone takes 1.0 putts (the true number, even on the PGA Tour, is probably something like 1.00000000000000001, but you get the picture…). From three, the number jumps to something like 1.04 - PGA Tour pros only make about 96% of their three-footers. The other four times, they two-putt. So (96 x 1) + (4 x 2) = 104. 104 strokes for 100 attempts is 1.04 strokes per attempt. In other words, if you have a three-foot putt, and you make it, you actually gain 0.04 strokes against your standard (if your standard is a PGA Tour player). By the standard, you should have taken 1.04 strokes to get the ball in the hole from three feet. You only took one stroke, so you "saved" the 0.04. If you somehow manage to make 100 three-foot putts in a row, that 0.04 strokes saved each time multiplies out to four strokes saved in total. Let's back up a bit farther. From eight feet, a PGA Tour player is about 50/50 to make it. They still almost never three-putt from this range, so let's just keep thing simple and consider that they're either going to hole it or two-putt. If they have 100 eight-foot putts, it would take the average PGA Tour player 150 putts to hole out. So, imagine that this 1.5 is your standard, and you make an eight-foot putt. You've "gained" half a stroke on the average. You were expected to take 1.5 strokes, but you took just one. If you miss an eight-footer on the next hole, you played two eight-footers in three strokes: dead on what you're expected to do. What if you happen to have six eight-foot putts in a row, on the golf course, and you miss them all? While it may feel as though you've given away six strokes, because all of those putts likely felt "makable," you've only given away about three strokes: 12 putts - 6 attempts * 1.5 putts/attempt = 3 strokes "lost." And that's if your standard of comparison is a PGA Tour player. If you want to compare yourself to a bogey golfer, you've actually lost only half that: 1.5 strokes (a bogey golfer takes about 1.75 strokes from eight feet, so 6 * 0.25 = 1.5). From 33 feet, the numbers are 2.0 for a PGA Tour player and about 2.2 for a bogey golfer. You're expected to take two strokes if you're a PGA Tour player, and 2.2 if you're a bogey golfer. Now, again, you can't take 2.2 strokes to hole out, but you can take 11 strokes over five attempts from 33 feet, and 11/5 = 2.2. Every five 33-foot putts, the PGA Tour player will gain a full stroke: it will take them 10 and the bogey golfer 11. Now that this part is understood, let's start putting some pieces together. Consider a golfer putting from B, above, 33 feet away from the hole. If he two-putts, he's going to finish neutral - he won't lose or gain strokes to a PGA Tour player. But let's imagine three scenarios. In the first, he hits his first putt to a foot and then taps in. In the second, he hits it to three feet. He takes his time and makes that. In the third, after horribly judging the speed, he hits his putt eight feet past the hole, but makes it coming back. In each instance he took two putts, but where he gained and lost strokes changes: a) 33', 1' b) 33', 3' c) 33', 8' The math on those start the same: from 33', the player is expected to take 2.0 strokes. It "costs" the player 1.0 strokes to hit the first putt, so at each of the second positions he has already expended one putt. If we look at the strokes gained for each of those distances, we find: a) 2.0, 1.0 b) 2.0, 1.04 c) 2.0, 1.5 In a, the player took one stroke to shave his "expected" strokes from 2.0 to 1.0. He's neither lost nor gained strokes, on either of his two strokes. He was expected to take 2.0 putts from 33', and he put it to a spot from which he's expected to take 1.0 more strokes. In the b and c, though, the numbers don't work out the same. If a player hits his 33' putt, as he does in b, to about three feet, we already know he's expected to take 1.04 strokes from there. So he was at 2.0 expected strokes, and he "spent" a full stroke to get to a position from which he is expected to take 1.04 strokes. He "lost" 0.04 strokes. That he then holed the three-foot putt is great - he "gained" that 0.04 strokes back. He was expected to take 1.04, but it only took him one stroke. c is even worse (and then better) for our player: from 33' he's expected to take 2.0 strokes, but he "spends" a stroke to hit his ball to a position from which he's expected to take 1.5 strokes. He's already hit a putt, and still has "1.5 putts" left, by the averages. So, going from 33' to 8' means our player LOST half a stroke on that putt. If he then holes the eight-foot putt, well, he gains it right back. Just as we saw above. This is how strokes gained (or lost) works: you look at the average number of strokes it takes a certain level of player to hole out from where they were before and after a stroke. If they're 33 feet away on the green (2.0), and they hit it to a position from which they're expected to take 1.2 strokes to hole out, they've lost 0.2 strokes with their first putt. It's the same thing from the tee, or an approach shot, too: even though a player is unlikely to hole out. Standing on the tee, a player is expected to take perhaps 4.0 strokes, and if they advance their ball with their tee shot to a position from which they're expected to take 3.18 strokes, they've lost 0.18 strokes with their tee shot. If they then hit their ball to 20 feet on the green (from which they might be expected to take 1.87 strokes), they've gained back 0.31 strokes (3.18 expected - 1 stroke taken - 1.87 expected strokes from new position). I've told this story a few times. @mvmac and I were playing a soggy course with a little wind coming from the south. The 10th and 12th holes on this course are 460 and 480 yards, and he had a hybrid and a 3-wood, while I had two hybrids, into each of the greens. We managed to hit our shots to about 15-25 feet, and we jokingly said to each other "strokes gained!" after each. Why? Because from 200 to 230 yards, hitting the green at all - let alone getting the ball to only 15 or 25 feet - is a substantial gain in strokes for a single shot. Heck, a PGA Tour player is going to average 1.87 strokes from 20 feet, and averages 3.32 from 220 yards out in the fairway, so that one stroke that took @mvmac and I from 220 yards to 20 feet cost us one stroke but saved us almost half a stroke (against a PGA Tour player): 3.32 - (1 + 1.87) = 0.45 strokes gained. Two-putting from there cost only the 0.13 strokes (2.0 - 1.87). Let's take a look at a hole: Let's imagine the hole is a certain distance and a hole on which you are likely to average 4.2. (If you're a scratch golfer, maybe the hole is 475 yards long, or if you're an 18 handicaper, maybe it's 355 yards long). Standing on the tee at A, you're expected to hole out in 4.2 strokes, which is of course impossible on any given single playing of the hole. That means that you're going to lose or gain 1.2, 0.2, 0.8, 1.8, or 2.8 strokes almost every time you play this hole. You can't break even on any single playing of the hole. But anyway, that's the important number: 4.2. Let's say you hit a good shot from the tee into the fairway to B. Again, to remain somewhat agnostic with respect to various handicaps, let's say you're going to average 3.0 from there. Your tee shot, which "cost" you one stroke, moved you from a spot where you were going to average 4.2 to a spot from which you average 3.0. You've shaved 1.2 strokes by "spending" only one stroke. Let's say that the rest of the positions work out as follows: B: 3.0 C: 3.2 D: 2.7 E: 3.6 Strokes gained (and "expected shots") is based primarily on two things (because adding in other factors could complicate things to the point of being ridiculous): the distance remaining to the hole and the lie of the ball. On the putting green, the lie of the ball is obviously "on the putting green." But from 180 yards, players average lower expected shots from the fairway than they do from the trees, or a fairway bunker. So again, a player expecting to average 4.2 from the tee (A), hits it into B, C, D, and E. If we limit the distances to relative descriptors, we can start to see how these make sense: B: 3.0 - Fairway, medium distance from the hole C: 3.3 - Fairway, long distance from the hole D: 2.7 - Rough, very short distance from the hole E: 3.6 - Fairway bunker, short-ish distance from the hole These four examples demonstrate two things that make strokes gained a pretty reasonable way to assess the value of a shot: the farther a shot is from the hole, the more shots you're expected to hole out, and the worse the lie, the same: the more strokes you're expected to take to hole out. Let's step through a full example. A player standing on the tee at A is going to hit it to C, miss the green in the rough short and right, chip to eight feet, and miss the par putt before tapping in for bogey. Shot Expected Result Expected Strokes Gained ---- -------- ------ -------- -------------- 1 4.2 C 3.3 -0.1 2 3.3 Grsd Rough 2.6 -0.3 3 2.6 8' Green 1.5 +0.1 4 1.5 3" Green 1.0 -0.5 5 1.0 Holed 0 0.0 -------------- Total: -0.8 The tee shot was played from a spot with 4.2 expected shots to a spot with 3.3 expected shots. This cost the player one stroke, but only reduced his expected score by 0.9. Thus, he lost 0.1 strokes. From there, the player hit a mediocre shot: they were in a position to average 3.3, but advanced the ball into a position from which they're expected to take 2.6. They gained only 0.7 strokes at a cost of another full shot. They lost 0.3 strokes. The player hit a slightly better than expected chip - they gained 0.1 strokes by hitting it from a 2.6 position to a 1.5 position (for this one position I'm just using the PGA Tour distance) at a cost of just one stroke - but the player is 1.1 strokes closer. But, then he missed the putt (1.5 expected strokes) and tapped in, losing 0.5 strokes on the two-putt exchange. In total, the player lost 0.8 strokes, but we know that just knowing the expected score from the tee and the score they made: 5 - 4.2 = 0.4 - 0.1 + 0.5. Though the player hit five shots, only two were "neutral" with respect to strokes gained or lost. The player lost partial strokes on the approach shot (which missed the green) and their putt (which missed the hole), but gained a very small 0.1 on a slightly better than expected chip shot. Let's do one more example: A to D to 3 feet and holed for a birdie. Shot Expected Result Expected Strokes Gained ---- -------- ------ -------- -------------- 1 4.2 D 2.7 +0.5 2 2.7 5' Green 1.25 +0.45 3 1.25 Holed 0.0 +0.25 -------------- Total: +1.2 This player hit a big tee shot (maybe it hit the cart path a couple of times) to D. He went from 4.2 to 2.7 expected strokes with one stroke, making up 0.5 strokes with his tee shot. Then, from short range, he hit his shot to five feet from where he's expected to take 1.25 strokes (he's expected to make 75% of his five-foot putts), again saving nearly half a stroke: 2.7 to 1.25 with a cost of one stroke is 2.7 - (1 + 1.25) = 0.45. Then, to wrap up the great hole, he holes the five-footer. These two examples highlight just how many different shots go into making up a score on any given hole: virtually every shot that isn't a tap-in results in an exchange - positive or negative - to the expected strokes. If you play a poorer shot than your comparison standard, you lose strokes. Play a better one than expected and you gain. The funny thing is, too, how people tend to see these shots. Though the player lost shots in the first example on both the tee shot and the approach shot, they're likely to blame a poor chip and a missed putt for the bogey. Yes, they lost strokes with the putt, but they actually gained a 0.1 strokes with the chip. The drive and the approach shot cost them, and the putt - a 50/50 proposition - simply landed heads up instead of tails up. In the second example, the players will likely give themselves credit for the approach shot, but overlook that they got a bigger advantage hitting the ball off the cart path and into the rough, where they gained a full half stroke. They'll also credit their clutch putting, but even if they'd two-putted, the strength of their first two shots would still have netted them 0.2 strokes gained for the hole. So that's it in a nutshell: both strokes gained and how partial shots work when playing golf. The next time you're out there, and you miss a 50/50 putt, take consolation in the fact that you're "owed" one. The next time you hit it to 25 feet from 162 yards, tell yourself that you gained some strokes with that shot (it's better than the PGA Tour average, after all). The next time you hit a good drive, take pride in saving 0.2 strokes or whatever. And, for Pete's sake, if you two-putt from 30 feet, stop kicking yourself for "never making them." Almost nobody does, and for players at your level, that two-putt probably saved you a partial stroke.
  10. rfeight

    Favorite Apps

    This has got to be the place to ask - What everyone's favorite apps? Right now my favorites are V1 for swing analysis and Skydroid for GPS. I'm on the Android system. I'd like to find a stats app giving me similar info as the Strokes Gained stuff. I've contemplated GolfShot and would welcome comments from users. Am interested in the Lowest Score Wins app, but can't seem to find it. Might just go with the Game Golf program but the Federal Return just cramped my golf funds. Thoughts?
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