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Found 48 results

  1. I was tempted to post "I doubt it," but I have this blog to use, so I'll use it for a quick discussion of this. I've taught a few thousand people to putt. I've never seen someone with their finger down the shaft who I would consider a "good" putter. More often - far, far more often - those with their finger down the shaft have distance control issues. The pressure they apply with that finger leads to added loft and wrist flipping, while many good putting strokes have de-lofted putters (4° turned down to 1°) and lead wrists that are slightly more in flexion than they were at setup. I understand what people think they're feeling - the pressure of the shaft/grip being applied to that finger - but again I've got SAM data and visual data (recorded) that leads me to these types of statements. I'm not super picky about putting grips. I putt with a pretty standard/classic reverse double overlap. My daughter is a single overlap kinda gal. I've taught claw grippers, crosshanders, etc. I could put the finger down the shaft (at least for awhile), and remain a good putter… but part of the reason I might be a good putter is that I don't put the finger down the shaft, and I've learned to control the putter swing by having a better wrist action than the one that the finger down the shaft encourages. Again, I've never seen a good putter who can actually control distance well with the finger down the shaft. Take it for what it's worth. P.S. If you try to putt without the finger down the shaft for awhile, don't judge the results immediately. Give it some time. And read this: P.P.S. Just because I've never seen it doesn't mean it doesn't exist. It only means I've never seen it…
  2. https://ixiasports.com/products/true-pendulum-motion I wanted to take a long overdue moment to talk a little bit about one of the better putting training aids on the market today. Putting is, as you know, one of the areas of the game that have the least effect on your score, and yet… is so, so, so frustrating to a lot of people. Though the average person loses fewer strokes to putting than they might think, those with a glaring weakness can really pile up the lost strokes, becoming increasingly frustrated with each and every one. Now, long-time forum members know that putting is three things: Read, Bead, and Speed. TPM won't be able to help you with the Read, but it can help you with the Bead and the Speed keys - starting putts on line and hitting them the correct distance. What is it? Essentially it's two extendable rods that attach to your putter mid-way down the shaft to help you create a more pendulum-like putting motion. The rods rest on top of your forearms and under your armpits. The attachment point to your putter is rubbery, so it's not "clamped" in, and the rods will give a little of course unless you really squeeze your armpits tightly, so there's still a little wiggle room for a little wrist action in the stroke, which is great. Each rod extends much like some ball retrievers you've seen - you twist the "outer" or "upper" rod one direction to loosen it, slide it to the desired length, and then tighten by twisting the other direction. The inner or lower rod is marked with numbers, so you can set the TPM to the same setting each time - kids will use the smaller numbers, while even someone who is over 6' tall can use the TPM comfortably. Cody, above, is about 5'8" and can generally use one of the middle length settings. You can see the effect it has on his putting stroke (particularly from face-on) below: Yes, he still adds a little "flourish" (out to the right) at the end of his putting stroke. It leads to some interesting looking traces in SAM PuttLab, but generally doesn't impact his putting, as it's well after the ball is gone. Here's James Sieckmann talking about the TPM: And 5SK guy Corey Lundberg: The TPM comes already assembled: The TPM is lightweight, but sturdy and strong with aluminum and rubber composition (and a little plastic). How do you use it? 1. Attach the TPM to your putter at about the mid-point of the shaft below the grip: 2. Spread the rods apart and extend them to the proper length for your setup style: 3. Grip your putter, resting the TPM against the top side of your forearms and beneath your arms: 4. Putt! That's all there is to it. As you can see, the TPM accommodates putting strokes of variety, too: regular, cross-handed, claw, pencil, and other styles. It may not work with every putting style (some more extreme arm-lock style strokes didn't work perfectly), but it worked for far more than it didn't work for. The TPM costs $89.99 and is available for order at https://ixiasports.com. It comes with my strong recommendation.
  3. Here are three graphs of putting strokes. The s axis is "speed" and the "t" axis is time. We'll take a look at each of these in a moment, but consider first how putting can behave like a pendulum. In virtually all good putting strokes, the ball is hit with a slight positive angle of attack (AoA) - about 2-3° or so. This positive AoA helps minimize backspin, produce no spin, or even to produce a tiny bit of forward spin if the dynamic loft is 1-2°. But the point is: the ball is struck while the putter head is ascending, or after low point . If you were to swing a pendulum back and through, maximum speed would be where? At the bottom. At low point. At every point after that, the speed would be lower. Even one tenth of one degree after low point, the pendulum is slowing down (negative acceleration, or deceleration). The best putters almost all tend to have a decelerating putter head at or even slightly before impact. Their putting stroke resembles a pendulum, reaching maximum speed at or slightly before impact. Consider also the length of a pendulum's swing. A theoretical pendulum (no loss of energy to friction) swings as far past center in one direction as it does in the other direction. Whether you measure it in degrees or a linear measurement, the pendulum swings 22.7° left and 22.7° right, or 13.1 inches left and 13.1 inches right. The best putters almost all tend to have similar length backswings and through-swings in their putting strokes. Their putting strokes continue to resemble a pendulum in this sense. Now let's take a look at each of these putting strokes. Here's a putting stroke typical of a golfer who has a terrible time controlling their distances. This golfer may have a great sense of touch from 5-10 feet, maybe even out to 15', but when you ask them to hit a 30' putt, you start to see issues. They'll hit one 27', the next 34', the one after that 25', and then maybe 33'. These golfers often make a backswing that's - let's just say - eight inches for a six-foot putt, nine inches for a 12-foot putt, and ten inches for a 30-foot putt. They're almost the same length. Then they have to accelerate their putters various amounts to reach various speeds at impact to send the ball various distances. If you wanted to make a pendulum swing faster at the bottom of the arc, given the same pendulum length and weight (we aren't changing putters or our setup appreciably), how would you accomplish this? Why… you'd simply pull the pendulum back farther before letting it go. So look at the speed and time plot of the poor putter above. I've marked the instantaneous speed at two points: just prior to impact and just after impact. Note that impact - even on a putting stroke - severely slows the putter head down. I've exaggerated it quite a bit in these graphs, but that's something I can do given that I haven't added any scale to these charts. :D It simply makes things clearer to see and thus easier to grasp. At any rate, note that the direction of each of the arrows - both the dashed (pre-impact) and dotted (post-impact) lines is pointing upwards. This means the putter head has positive acceleration. It's speeding up. Note the pronounced "hump" after impact. Though the ball slows the putter head down temporarily, it's still speeding up, so you see a second peak speed after impact. This golfer is roughly 99% likely to have poor distance control. Let's look at the good and great putting dynamics (and by good I mean pretty darn good, because as you'll note the differences between these two are subtle): Note how in Good the putting stroke reaches maximum speed at the ball. The proof of this is that the acceleration is neither positive nor negative - the arrow is pointing horizontally, indicating that the speed is neither going up nor down. Constant speed is no acceleration (positive or negative). Notice that this condition continues immediately after impact, and the putter head continues to slow down thereafter. In the Great image, the putter head is actually slowing down slightly at impact (the arrow points downward). Then you see the BIG deceleration caused by the putter impacting the ball, and then the deceleration continues from there. Contrast those with what we often see from the golfers with the absolute worst distance control: This golfer actually manages to reach peak/maximum speed after the ball has left the putter . Note that his acceleration curve going into impact actually steepens - he is accelerating more at impact than at any other point in the downstroke. Then he accelerates MORE until he rapidly decelerates, well after impact, to bring the putter to a halt. This is more common than you might think. Golfers have been told for decades to "accelerate through the ball" and to "putt authoritatively" and so on. This advice ranks near the top of my list for counter-productive, harmful advice. By and large, the poorest putters accelerate far too much for far too long (including up to and after impact), while the best putters have roughly matching backstrokes and through-strokes that deliver the putter head to the ball while it is either not accelerating at all or is negatively accelerating (i.e. decelerating, or slowing down). If you feel you may be "accelerating" your putter into impact, put three coins on the ground, equally spaced from each other, in a line. Put the ball near the middle one, and practice making backstrokes that go to one and finish at the other. Try to feel that you're not adding anything to the downstroke or follow-through: you're not accelerating the putter much (just let gravity do it - in reality your muscles will contribute, but it's uncommon to feel much muscle contribution) and you're not forcing yourself to "brake" the putter too much at the end, either. Just make a natural, smooth stroke that matches - coin to coin. To change how far you hit the ball, move the coins farther apart or closer together, keeping the distances the same. If you still struggle with this, swing to the second or third longest coin, but still try to hit the ball a short distance and finish at the first or second coin on the follow-through. It's that simple. P.S. Note that I've made no attempt to show the scale of t and s. Specifically, I've fudged things a bit by implying that the the t is the same for all of these strokes, and that impact occurs at the same moment. This is very unlikely to be true: if you make a short backstroke and accelerate all the way up to and even after impact, you're likely to have a shorter (time) downswing and to reach impact sooner. They line up because I wanted to keep things simple, and because timing isn't really the topic here. P.P.S. A really old example of a SAM PuttLab read-out can be seen here . P.P.P.S. (2014-08-13) A great series of pictures and a simple explanation of the "why" is found in post #179:
  4. I've been thinking lately about the short game and putting, specifically proximity to the hole from around the green. I don't actually know how close I should be getting to the hole at my skill level. Game Golf tells me I'm 97% < 5 yards within 25 yards (I wish they would break this down more), but let's say I average 12' from the hole. A PGA Tour pro makes ~30% of those putts. A Tour-level putter I most certainly am not; I might make < 10% of my 12' putts. I'm not scrambling at the rate I should be and I don't know if the problem is with my short game or my putting. If I don't hit it within 5-6', I don't have a realistic expectation of making the putt. I'd bet that means I'm 50% from about that distance. I know I have room for improvement in putting. My short game has gotten better to the point where I feel like I'm hitting the ball consistently well but I'm misjudging what it's going to do when it hits the green, so I feel like I could get it closer more often. So where's the point of diminishing returns? Do I spend more time on the short game and try to get the ball closer, or do I work on my putting and try to increase that make %? Is it even reasonable (for me) to expect to be within 12' from nGIR, or to make 25% of 12' putts? Given limited resources (time), what priority is going to affect scores the most?
  5. What are the general thoughts about Brooks Koepka's putting grip with the extended right pointer finger? After playing around with this over the past few days it is a change I'm actually really interested in making permanently. I often feel extreme disconnect between my hands and the club while putting and this is something that really unites the two for me.
  6. In all the years that I have played golf (i.e. mid 1980's), I have discovered that everyone is unique when it comes to putting. Everyone has their own special grip, their own special stance, their own special swing tempo, etc...etc... I have my prized, custom made, generic/component mallet putter, 35" long, and resembles an old Odyssey Rossie II mallet putter with the black polymer insert. Anyway, I use a slightly bizarre putting grip, slightly upright stance, and it just works for me. I'll try to describe it when you look at the photo below, that I just took in my living room, while practicing putting across the carpet. Anyone ever seen a putting grip like mine? Right hand: Right thumb centered on grip, covering up the "Crown" logo of Titleist/Scotty Cameron Baby T putter grip. Right fingers naturally curl around the grip. Left hand: Left thumb centered on grip and tightly nestled into fleshy part of right hand palm. Left index finger, as odd as it looks, the left index finger points down the shaft, resting on top of the right hand fingers. Left fingers (middle, ring, pinky) naturally curl around the grip.
  7. My shoulder isn't 100% and it's going to rain, but f*** it I'm going golfing tomorrow.

    1. nevets88

      nevets88

      Go for it!

  8. Just a simple video, putting on my living room carpet this morning, and wanted to try to make a "comparison" video with the camera right down behind the ball, showing my putting stroke...1) Cheap, used, Odyssey Dual Force blade putter from "Play It Again Sports" here in town.2) My prized, custom made, generic component, "Butch Ammon" mallet putter (it's a copy of the Odyssey Rossie II).What do you think of my standard, pendulum, straight out 'n back, type of putting stroke? Those two errant shots off to the right, were me acting foolish and rushing the shot. Normally, I can make those simple 6' putts on the carpet over and over and over and over, 18... 19... 20 times in a row.
  9. Hello everyone, I apologize if I'm posting in an inappropriate location as this is my first post, but I have a question regarding the Rules. I understand a person cannot place an object on the "line of the putt" at any point to help aid in a putt, but I was wondering if it's a rule violation to place a marker behind the hole while aligning the ball markings. It's easier to line the markings up with a smaller item sometimes than with the entire hole, and it would be placed directly behind the hole just while aligning the arrows on the ball. Rule 8-2b states one cannot place a mark on the "line of the putt," but "line of the putt" is defined as not extending past the hole, meaning that placing a mark behind the hole wouldn't violate this rule, as long as the mark was removed before the stroke was made. Thanks!
  10. I'm not sure I agree. It's differences in green speeds that affects people more. If your typical muni stimps 8.5, the golfer who is used to that will struggle when they play somewhere where the green stumps 11. But the reverse is true, as well. People used to 11-12 are going to struggle when they play an 8 green. Tour players complain when the greens are slow (sometimes we see this with American players at the British Open, for example). It's not just Tour players who play fast greens. Most of the private clubs I have played at have faster greens (though my munis are actually pretty good TBH) and the members of those clubs would be used to that speed. You don't just automatically become a better putter because the green is slower. You'll under-hit your speed and over-read breaks until you adjust. False
  11. Curious to hear why putts are missed in the 10 - 15 foot range.
  12. https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/golfputt-ar/id1289750170?ls=1&mt=8 It's gonna be awhile before I'm on a putting green (maybe this afternoon), but the author wrote and the app can be used free. For $1.99 you can disable ads.
  13. Hi Guys, I'm fairly new to this website. I wanted to join to begin a forum on Indoor Putting Greens. I know most of us reside in the cold states where we can only sit and dream about golf. I grew tired of this routine of playing golf and finding my game by the time it was too late and the leaves began to fall and soon enough the snow-birds were snow-birding again.... lol. Anyways, I'm an avid golfer, a golf junkie, a golf pyscho, a serial golfer... whatever it is I'm just obsessed with the game. I love it, like all of us do on this site. I've got 3 kids, so this project was a MUST DO. I made a massive putting green in the basement after reading many reviews for the material Kevin Na and Ben Crane were touting about a couple years ago. I learnt many of the tour pros used this material so I HAD to get my hands on it. I thought it would've been pricey but it was super affordable. I spent about 2 weeks building and boy, was it worth it. The finished product was beyond my imagination - I've played many great golf courses and the green actually emulated the best. I even added slopes. And for the record, I'm basically here to spread the word that it is completely possible to have a massive(or small) putting green in your home without breaking the banks like these synthetic turf company's charge. The project literally cost me less than $400. The kids love it, they're down there and have practically forgotten about their Ipads and Ipods and video games(true story). But best of all, the WIFE APPROVES. Here are some pictures - If people are interested in how I constructed, please just feel free to comment. We do not need to be golf hibernators anymore! :)
  14. Mulligan87

    Close to giving up the game!

    Hi Guys I've been very close to giving up the game recently and just wanted to see if others have similar feelings post round. So passionate to play golf and improve and will always spend the time practicing to get better. Recently have been playing great golf only to be 3 putting from 15- 20 yards. whenever i'm playing well I can't hole 3 footers its insane!! I play off of 10 but I just can't putt when it means something. if i'm having a mediocre/bad round i'm ok with the putter but Havn't hit under my handicap in 20+ rounds and i'm actually creeping up when i'm playing/ striking the ball well enough to be lower. I'm at my wits end with it and just don't know where to go as it seems more of a mental problem that I just can't seem to overcome. Absolutely love the game of golf and spend every moment outside work thinking about golf if i'm not playing it. I know theres going to be cliché comments about not letting the last shot dictate your mood, I don't have a short fuse compared to some folk I see on the course but when its a constant problem, hole after hole after hitting in regulation i'm losing my head!!! Spend the weekend post round in a sometimes sombre mood and just thinking..... is this game worth playing if its constantly dictating my mood? Sorry to ramble on.... Cheers Guys
  15. natureboy

    What's the deal with grain?

    So at the event at Kapalua, announcers pointed out what they called an effect of grain on a putt by Ryan Moore (gif below) where the trajectory of a left-to-right putt seems to change in a slight double-break. Objections were raised that studies of grain effects indicated they were minimal...up to 2 inches on a 20' putt. Not sure if that was for mostly level or appreciable slope. This jibes with what I recall about grain from one of the original empirical looks at grain in Vector Putting (since superseded / updated by AimPoint)...that it was relatively a small contribution vs. slope. From what I've come across, the least 'grainy' grass is supposed to be Poa Annua as it has the most vertical 'growth habit', while creeping bentgrass has more tendency to develop grain, and Bermuda even more (greens at Kapalua). The intuitive assumption might be that amount of deflection is spread out evenly along the whole length of the putt (like slope is - ball is always falling) so grain-induced deflection is like .008" per foot of putt length. I'm not convinced that's how it would work as it seems likely that grass grain (if present) would have more effect on a slower moving ball (end portion of longer putts or most of a short putt that is only intended to go a bit past the hole). So shorter putts might experience a greater percentage of deflection (but still under 2"). Most of the information says that grass grain tends to follow the slope (downhill) if it's present. So grain and slope would typically be aligned the same. On that basis it's implied that in the GIF above there was most likely a slope change that is reflected in the color change of the grass. The more closely mown the grass, the less the grain tends to be in play because the stems are cropped nearer the ground. But here's a video where grain has developed independent of slope sun or maintenance practices due to some particular quirks of the site, green location, or the plants. Grain changes 180 degrees where there is no appreciable change in slope. Based on the video above it seems possible that the color change apparent on the green in the Kapalua GIF isn't a change is slope, but only a 'random' variation in the grain as in the video above. In that case it seems like the 'jog left' the putt seems to take might be a case of the 'rising fastball' effect where the anticipation of the curve on the early phase of the putt as the ball is falling with gravity on a 'fast' portion of grain continues to fall, but does so more slowly on a 'slow' portion of grain (opposite the slope / falling ball) and tracks into the hole on a less curved than expected line for the average 'grain with the slope' green speed? So what's your experience? Do you find that grain primarily follows slope so that you can use visual 'grain' cues to help find slope inflections? And do you find patches of grain on some courses / holes that does not follow the downhill slope? If so, how frequently, and do you notice any common patterns or is it more random? If you notice grain effects, what type of grass is it usually? Do you find short putts have an equal amount of break as longer putts or do you find the effect of grain proportional to the length of the putt? Do you notice differing effects from grain if the average stimp is high or low? Here's some general info on grain and green agronomy (who knew there was a global turf network):
  16. Note: this fix worked for me in order to achive better aligment to the target, may not work for u but you can try it. I always wanted to align the ball line to my target on putts inside 15 feet like the pro and a lot scratch amateur i played with do. So i give it a lot of hours and every time the same happened, i aligned the ball to my target from behind the ball but when i take my stance over the ball the line aims to the rigth of the target, i putted along that line of the ball and i always missed rigth. A week ago on the putting green i decided to give it a go one more time, and the same as always. But this time i get a little creative and try out this fix. For a 4,5 feet (1 yard and a half) straigth putt i aimed to the left lip of the hole from behind the ball and when i take my stance the line aimed at the middle of the hole. Eureca I thought, but not. Do the same from 9 feet, from behind to the left lip but over the ball it was aimed at the rigth lip. As a man who love math i easy realiced that at 4,5 feet the difference between back from top view was half a hole and from 9 feet ( exactly 4,5 feet x 2 ) was a complete hole. It was easy to figure out that from 18 feet the difference will be 2 complete holes so from behind i have to aim 1 hole and a half from the left lip of the hole, i tryed and it worked!! over the ball the line was aiming at the center of the hole, and every well stroke putter rolls in that line to the middle of the hole. I still had one problem, what about 4 feet.. 8 feet, how much left i have to aim..? it´s hard to guess the exact place to aim, even more in tournament when you have to speed up. I figured out that if i extend the arm (like i do in long shots to aim) and aim 1 finger to the left of the target from behind the ball, when i´m over the ball the line is aiming at the hole. This weekend played and important tournament (posted it on the tournament thread), such were the good results on the practice green i decided to put this fix into play. It worked beautifully, every good stroked putter started in my intended line. As a good green reader i holed a lot of putts in 11-12 speedmeter perfect greens. This is my routine with this fix for a 6 footer half a hole break from rigth to left: While other players are playing i read my put (speed/line), when it´s my turn i place the ball and look for a spot a finger left of my target. My target it´s right lip of the hole, 1 finger left at that range it´s 0,66 of a hole, so the spot will be a bit left of the center of the hole. I align the ball line to that spot and take my stance, now over the ball i see the line aiming at the rigth lip and i can putt with confidence that i´m aiming ok. Need to work on the stroke but at least now i know that i´m aiming a lot better to my target more often with the bonus of the feedback of the line roling true to the hole or not when i hit it bad.
  17. chipandcharge

    Seeing slopes correctly on the green

    I discovered something curious about my vision--when I stand naturally and look at a line that is perfectly horizontal, I see it as descending to the left around three degrees to the left. This means that if I look at a green that is perfectly flat and perfectly horizontal, I see a three degree slope to the left. For years, I couldn't understand why putts that looked straight in, broke to the right, and putts that looked like they would break to the left, went straight. When I got some advice to also look from behind the cup and saw the opposite break compared to looking from behind the ball, I attributed it to an optical illusion. Then one day, I discovered in my living room that horizontal lines such as the intersection between a wall and the ceiling and the top of a tv set looked like they were descending to the left. I used a carpenter's level to make sure that the lines were horizontal. I had my vision checked and was told that my dominant eye must have rotated in my eye socket and that it could be corrected by surgery on the muscles. I didn't want to do that, so using my engineering background, I came up with two methods of adjusting for this problem. The first is looking at the slope near the cup from behind the ball and behind the cup and estimating an average. For example, if the slopes are three degrees to the left from behind the ball and behind the cup, they cancel out, and the surface is horizontal. If the slopes point in the same direction from behind the ball and behind the cup, the "true" slope is the average of the two. There are other combinations. There is a problem that still remains--after estimating the actual slope, I have to putt an imaginary slope, or I have to develop a "cause and effect" relationship between the false slope and how the ball breaks for that false slope. I found a second correction last night that I will write about later.
  18. I have been working on putting lately, primarily bead and speed (I will work on read in the future, when I am able to take an AimPoint class). At least I think I have been. I've been doing drills, but maybe I'm more finding out what I do wrong than fixing them. It's now getting more than the baseline 15% of my practice time (GG tells me I'm losing more strokes there, by quite a margin, compared to other parts of my game), but I want to make sure that time is well spent and leads to improvement. I worry that I may be getting into the "just hitting balls at the range" equivalent for putting. My problem is, when I'm doing drills and learning that I am not hitting my goals (not getting the ball across the ruler for that drill, taking many iterations to do a 4' 8' 12' drill, etc), how do I figure out what, if anything to change? I also worry that when doing a clock drill, if I miss from the same position on a few iterations, my next attempt from there might be a false read by what happened, not because I read it wrong, but because I kept pushing from there and thus aim left to make it. I'm fine with the idea of compensating for a miss during a round, but I don't want to do that when I'm practicing. I know that putting particulars vary wildly; should this be a case of "go back to the Utley putting book and review each chapter in order," or is there something else I can do to help on this? Timeline wise, my club championship is in a little over a month. I'm not in cramming mode at the moment, and I would like to be a better putter by then, but my overall goal is long-term improvement not peaking for this particular event.
  19. lets say i putt and chip for an hour to 2 hours every single day for 60 days straight, and lets also say that i am a relatively new golfer that started this summer and shoots around a 55, do you think doing this would increase my scores pretty drastically? and if so by how much like how much would it really help and be worth it? i understand that putting/chipping makes up for half or even more than half your strokes so it basically makes it the most important part of the game. So how much would doing this much practice really help and lower my scores?
  20. I'm sure it's not just me. Just got back from our yearly golf pilgrimage in Arizona (which was incredible) and I'm the worst putter in the group, even worse than guys who are 5-8 shots worse than me hcp wise. One round I lost track of how many 3-putts after six times. I'm about 50% from 3-5 ft. Longer putts I'd save time and strokes by just taking 2 putts and staying in the cart. I have a hard time getting putts to start on line which makes it hard to make short ones. The putter tends to go all over the place on my backswing. Some things I've tried: Different types of putters (face vs. toe balanced). Left hand low (which is how I putt now). Claw grip. Putting mirror and rail. Putter wheel. Eyes closed (some success, but nothing long term). This at least helps me not watch the putter or look up too soon. I had pros look at my stroke on SAM a while back. My stroke is better one handed (either hand) than with both hands. Stroke tends to be fairly straight back, then follow through long and too far left. Everyone says putt with their shoulders, but what's the best move to start the putter back? Pull with your right shoulder blade? Push down with left shoulder? Thanks for the comments.
  21. I've struggled with putting for years. I've tried different putters, different grips, different techniques, all for naught. See my other post about "Anyone else have this much trouble putting?" This past week, I saw this video: I practiced this in my garage a couple of days, just working on getting a good roll and getting my eyes in a position where everything looked lined up, then I played yesterday and BAM! I had one of the best putting days I've ever had. I have no relation to this person or company, I just stumbled upon this video and hopefully it'll help other people. I made two birdies and a couple of par savers from 10-20' and had three 40'+ that either lipped out or stopped literally a ball's width from the hole! Even my friends were commenting on how well I was rolling it. I have no idea how I'll putt next time, but until then I'm just going to enjoy the memory!
  22. I posted a question asking the rationale for a two stroke penalty for hitting the flagstick while putting from the green. I came to realize that the rationale was to prevent golfers from using the flagstick in long range or steep downhill situations from acting as a backstop thus avoiding a three putt. What got sticky was the question of putting or chipping from just off the green where your intent is to sink the putt not just to try to stop it close to the hole. My experience and that of most of the good golfers I have played with is your odds go up if you remove the flagstick. However, some people on the previous post insisted without any real evidence that I was wrong. So just for kicks and giggles I'd love to do a poll to hear what most people on this site do in that situation. To make it specific lets say the ball is resting not more than three feet off the green is relatively level and without a severe break and the distance to the hole is under 15 feet. In other words a putt you can have some confidence you could make.
  23. Hello - Can anyone take a look at the placement of this putting tape on my putter? 1) Is the tape too low on the face of my putter? 2) If not, am I hitting the ball too high on the face of the putter? above the 'perfect' spot on the tape 3) how can i fix where I hit the ball if I am hitting it "too high" on the face? Thanks!
  24. Now that I've finished up a bunch of home DIY projects primarily in anticipation of our WHOLE family coming to our house for the Thanksgiving holiday, it is now 1. cold outside, it came quickly, 2. I don't have many projects left and I'd like to do a fun one. I have a 14 x 21 ft. office that is basically an office/man cave all-in-one. My wife and I have no kids yet but we may have one soon. This would be a good opportunity to create something in the house that I can relax and do while still watching the baby. I started my research and found some awesome custom indoor practice greens with fringe and everything... check the price tag and nearly fell out of my chair! $3,000-$6,000 for something like what I was thinking. I would say my budget is < $1,000. It would be built over the existing tight berber carpet. My main focuses are: 1. A quality, durable, even putting surface. My NC greens are bentgrass. They play slow (stimp 9 to 11 if I recall). If I can get something similar to this that would be excellent. I don't mind spending more for higher quality here. 2. I would like fringe around the majority of the perimeter because it should look a little nicer and it would be good practice putting from some fringe (which I often do). Our fringe is typically bermuda - so something like this would be great. I believe my initial design has some good space to include some larger sections of fringe. 3. I do not care about adding break components in this project. I'd rather focus my indoor practice on getting putts on line and some distance control with good, straight and flat feedback on my stroke. 4. I want it to have real holes. I'll also get short flag sticks. I've attached my rough draft I just whipped up of my initial design thoughts. It should be relatively to scale. Rough overall dimensions would be 7' x 17'. Right now I'm thinking I'll make the base out of 2x4, 3.5-in height + 1/2-in drywall is about ~4-inches tall plus putting/fringe surfaces. I'm worried though that because of the overall length of the green that it will flex under the padding of the carpet. Maybe not a big deal though? I might be overthinking that one. For the various more rounded edges I'll just do multiple cuts at varying degrees of edge cut to make a turn and then just cut a more rounded fringe? Or maybe find a more creative way? I think the areas I need the most help with are the surface materials, what type, where to get them, how to apply them best, and also some design components for good practice. Should I make a larger chunk of it fringe? Maybe the first 3-5 ft from the top area all fringe? Hole locations? Different fringe area cutouts? What would you do to maximize practice/drills (but without any break ) Here's some stuff online that I really liked: http://www.carolinacustomputtinggreens.com/indoor-putting-greens I would likely start this build in late February 2017. I want to make sure I have all my ducks in a row. TIA!
  25. This came up in a different thread so lets see if you do putt with a finger pointed down the shaft, if you did putt with a finger down the shaft or you use a different grip all together. If you select other, you can tell us your grip style.
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