MacGregor Introduces Bobby Grace DCT Putters

Interchangeable faces and adjustable weights will give players a lot of options in achieving the feel they prefer for different green speeds and conditions.

Bag DropEver since I picked up a Fat Lady Swings putter more than a decade ago, I’ve been something of a Bobby Grace putter fan. His original designs always bear something of a rugged industrial look that just seems to mean business.

His latest line of putters for MacGregor comes with something called “Distance Corrective Technology” (DCT) that allows you to swap between a polymer and a milled titanium face to change the feel and response of the putter.

There are three putters in the line. Two are more traditional Anser-like heads while the third is a high MOI (moment of inertia) mid-mallet that looks a lot more conventional than Grace’s past V-Foil putters.

Response DCT Putter
This is the high MOI model that comes in a double-bend heel-shafted configuration. The head is milled from aircraft aluminum that seems to be a favorite material for Bobby Grace. A 303 stainless steel backweight is positioned in the flange extension while two removable weights screw into ports in the sole at the heel and toe.

Macgregor Response Dct Putter

The polymer face option is supposed to provide a softer feel for faster greens while the harder titanium face is meant to provide more feedback on slower greens. It’s my opinion you’re better off picking the face with the feel you prefer and then sticking with it no matter the green speed. But that’s just me.

Because it’s a double bend shaft, I think we can safely surmise it’s a face-balanced putter and thus excellent for players with a straight back, straight through putting stroke.

The head features a couple of Grace design trademarks: the stepped down bumpers harkens back to the Fat Lady Swings design and the beveled sole helps prevent snagging the putter on the backswing.

DCT1 and DCT3 Putters
Macgregor Dct1 PutterWhat MacGregor is also calling “Face-Off” technology also shows up in two Anser-like models. The DCT1 comes with a long plumber’s neck while the DCT3 features a double bend shaft that connects directly into the clubhead.

Like the Response model, the interchangeable faces are surrounded in yellow so you end up with a pretty vivid top-line alignment aid that I think actually looks pretty good.

The faces are screwed in from the back with a special tool that comes with the putter. While the weights are removable, I don’t believe the putters come with other weights so if you want to change you’ll have to pop for an optional weight kit.

Grace has always done a good job translating Anser-like heads to his own design and with these latest versions, that trait continues. These are very good looking putters even with the new face technology.

Specifications
Macgregor Dct Putter FacesAll three models come in 33-, 34-, and 35-inch lengths with 3° of loft and a lie angle of 71°. All are available in both left- and right-handed versions.

The real difference between the models (other than look) is in their moment of inertia. MacGregor reports the Response putter’s MOI is 5121, while the DCT 1 is 4466, and the DCT3 is 4098.

Price and Availability
The putters have just begun shipping and should be showing up in stores and pro shops soon. Edwin Watts has the Response DCT model in stock in right hand in all three lengths and is selling it for $199.99.

In the End…
As a putter maven it’s always fun to see a new model come out, especially from so accomplished a designer as Bobby Grace. I’m looking forward to test rolling some putts with these as soon as I come across them. Who knows… maybe one of these is the magic wand that’ll end my life long quest for the perfect stick.

8 thoughts on “MacGregor Introduces Bobby Grace DCT Putters”

  1. I just bought it, tested it and love it…I’m impressed. I will only use the polymer face for softer feel i.e. choose one and stick with it.

  2. Bought the DCT #3, loved it, however it is almost too fragile to be in the bag. The shaft is held on with a little epoxy and a small screw less than a 1/8th of an inch from the bottom which immediately weakens the shaft. I leaned on it to get a ball out of the hole and broke the head completely off. I received a second putter from the retailer and it broke inside the bag somehow. I pulled off the head cover to putt and the head was moving. My understanding is Bobby Grace ceased production on this putter and is redesigning how the shaft is connected to the head.

  3. I just bought the DCT response. Went to a large golf store prepared to buy a 2-bar putter and picked up the DCT response for kicks. It seemed like I couldn’t miss a putt with it. Have played 2 rounds and love it! Very solid and balanced feel.

  4. I’ve had the DTC #3, great putter but the head comes loose to easy. MacGreger will replace or repair it if less than a year old, but it takes weeks and what happens after the one year? Nice putter but needs to be more durable. My other putters have lasted years with never an issue.

  5. The putter was recommended by our son’s golf pro at the local golf shop and it was to be the what he needed to make the corrections for the previous poor putts. Hadn’t had it for more than 25 rounds before the head began to wobble. New to the golf club brokerage business but the owner of the franchise (National Dealer) refused to return money, claims they can not be fixed, and exchanged for a lower cost putter. I am not sure how extending a shaft on a putter that can’t be fixed voids a warranty? A design defect from the factory is a defect regardless . Nothing against Bobby Grace, but knowing my strength of materials from college, basic principles of weapons alignment from work, there are some physical sciences missing in DCT, Distance Control Technology. The problem with most golfers is they can’t put the “MFD” Most favorite dimple on the precise “Sweet Spot”. How does one get their son’s hard earned money back from someone that hasn’t found the “MFD” and continues to think the sweet spot is about to come back like lady luck?

  6. Yep! I got mine from a guy who had a grip put on it, and as the tech tapped the grip down on a paper towel on the floor, the head came off in his hand. I am actually on line now to find a replacement threaded stud, but after reading these comments, I think I’ll reborn and tap with right hand threads with a longer and slightly softer threaded stud.
    Thanks for the info, guys. I will make mine better than the original, by mid January 2017. If you want yours fixed, find me, my name is unique.

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