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I’m Caddie Tour GPS Review

Feb. 4, 2013     By     Comments (8)

I'm Caddie 3I subscribe to the K.I.S.S. method (Keep It Simple Stupid). On the golf course I rely on my stock ball flight unless I am absolutely forced to move the ball one direction or another. My first thought on every short game shot is what is the simplest way to play it, and I always try to err on the safe side with any shot decision. So it's safe to say I am not exactly Phil Mickelson. So when I was asked to review the I'm Caddie Talking Golf GPS, one if the simplest golf GPS devices on the market, I thought this gadget might be right down my alley.

Brush Caddy Review

Apr. 15, 2011     By     Comments (2)

Brush CaddyWe all know that taking a divot is a good thing if it's made in front of the ball, but even if it's behind the ball, there is one result that is the same - dirt and sand caked on the face and in the grooves of your club. So unless you want the face of your club to look like a 5 year old kid went wild with 24-grit sandpaper after a single practice range session, after nearly every shot you're walking back to your bag, wiping down the face with a towel, and possibly cleaning the grooves out. While you're doing repeating this process, it doesn't seem as if that much time is wasted, but think of how much more efficient your practice could be if you never had to go back to your bag to clean your clubs.

That's where the Brush Caddy (the product for which the company is also named) come into play. The Brush Caddy sticks in the ground right beside your pile of balls, allowing you to quickly clean your clubs. While that's a great theory, does it pan out in practice? Read on for my take.

PURE Grips Review

Jul. 9, 2010     By     Comments (12)

PURE GripsTake a moment to consider the grips on your golf club. Odds are they're the most unappreciated piece of equipment in your bag. I know guys who care more about their ball markers, their divot repair tools, and their towels than they care about their grips.

What sense does that make? The only way you can control the golf club is through your hands, and your hands touch the golf club via the grip only. In some ways, the grip is more important than whether you've got a game-improvement cavity back iron on the end of the shaft or a 1970s style muscleback blade - if you can't grip the club properly you've got little chance of success with either.

Sneak Peek at Sun Mountain’s Upcoming Micro E Cart

Oct. 30, 2009     By     Comments (16)

We liked Sun Mountain's Speed E Cart. We liked their Micro Cart too. So - and I'm going out on a limb here, I know - it stands to reason we might very well like this upcoming Micro E Cart when it comes to market.

Have a look:

Sun Mountain Micro Cart Review

Jul. 30, 2009     By     Comments (30)

Micro Cart FoldedTalk long enough to anyone who regularly walks when they play golf and they'll eventually tell you two things. First, walking is the best way to play golf. The fresh air, the feel of the ground beneath your feet, the perfect rhythm it creates. And second, that sometimes 14 clubs, a dozen balls, a rain jacket, an umbrella, a bag, and miscellaneous other goodies can be an awful lot to carry.

Trolleys or carts - be they of the push or pull variety - have long served as a great compromise. Golfers could walk and enjoy all that offers them while shedding the load from shoulders already burdened with making par at the last to relieve their friends of a few bucks.

Earlier this year, Sun Mountain rolled out the Micro Cart. The cart is positioned, both in terms of size and price, as a direct competitor to the Clicgear cart we reviewed about a year ago. What did we find out about the Micro Cart? Read on to find out.

Golfdotz Golf Ball Tattoos Review

Jan. 16, 2009     By     Comments (3)

PackagesRule 12-2 in the 2008 USGA Rules of Golf states "The responsibility for playing the proper ball rests with the player. Each player should put an identification mark on his ball." Anyone who plays competitive golf knows the importance of being able to identify your ball. In fact, the people at Sanford, the makers of the Sharpie Marker, have made more than a little money from the golf industry by this very fact.

But what about those who find a simple dot too dreary? What about those golfers out there who want to express themselves artistically? Well, fear no more, decorative duffers, as Golfdotz is here to help.

Golfdotz are the new generation in golf ball marking technology. They are golf ball tattoos - tiny decals that transfer onto the cover of a golf ball. They come in many different designs including skulls, hearts, flames, ladybugs and more. The retail at $5.99 a pack which will get you enough for two dozen balls, and are offered in a wide array of designs.

But how do they work? Read on.

Frogger Amphibian Towel Review

Sep. 19, 2008     By     Comments (11)

Frogger Amphibian Towel HeroSeveral weeks back I discussed some towel options you may want to check out during your next trip to your favorite golf shop (or to look at during lunchtime at the office). One of the towels mentioned was the Frogger Amphibian towel, which I've been using for the past month.

I know what you might be thinking, "It's just a towel" but if you're even semi-fanatical about keeping your clubs clean while on the course, you know how important a good towel can be. A good towel is key in keeping your clubs free and clear of debris and looking good. Read on to find out why I think the Amphibian towel is the best towel currently on the market.

iGolf Neo GPS Review

Sep. 19, 2008     By     Comments (46)

The iGolf NeoAre you still pacing off yardages? How many times do you find a marker that seems inaccurate? Wouldn't you rather have a rangefinder? I know, they're expensive, but now there's one that costs less than a new fairway wood.

The iGolf Neo represents the new entry point for GPS rangefinders. At $149.99 (plus a $30 annual subscription), the iGolf Neo will make owning a GPS rangefinder a more likely proposition for many golfers.

I know what you're thinking, a GPS rangefinder for $150? It must be seriously limited in features. Well, as a matter of fact, this review is a bit overdue, because I've been enjoying playing golf with the iGolf Neo instead of writing about it.

Leupold GX-I Laser Rangefinder Review

Aug. 29, 2008     By     Comments (34)

Leupold GX-I Laser RangefinderI started a Bushnell PinSeeker 1500 review in 2005 with the sentence "Tiger Woods has long said that the secret to good golf is always being pin high." A lot has changed since 2005, but Tiger's advice still rings true.

What has changed is that three years ago rangefinders and GPS units were a rarity. In 2005, these types of devices were illegal. Since 2006, they've been legal for tournament play under a local rule, and it seems as though every serious golfer has one (or more!) in their bags. The market has expanded quickly, and the early guys in - Bushnell with laser rangefinders and SkyGolf with GPS - are being challenged at every turn.

One of the challengers in the laser rangefinder category is longtime rifle scope-maker Leupold (& Stevens) with their GX-I and GX-II laser rangefinders. These rangefinders notably improve upon the venerable PinSeeker 1500 in just about the only ways I think a laser rangefinder can really be improved: by adding features, making it smaller, and shaving a hundred bucks off the asking price.

I've put the GX-I to a thorough test. Read on for my results.

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