Callaway Rogue and Rogue Sub Zero Drivers Review

After an Epic year, Callaway went Rogue. Promising distance in a forgiving driver, the Rogue borrows Jailbreak and more from its big brother. Let’s see how the Rogue and Sub-Zero fare.

Callaway Rogue DriverCallaway had a huge hit in 2017 with its Epic woods. In particular the Great Big Bertha Epic Driver earned its way into a lot of bags. On several occasions last year, I found myself in foursomes with three or four Epic drivers in play. That’s testament to a very popular driver.

To follow up on the Epic, Callaway debuted the Rogue this year to much fanfare. Like the Epic, the Rogue features “Jailbreak Technology,” those two bars behind the clubface designed to produce more distance through increased ball speed. In the Epic, that technology not only captured the imagination of golfers, it also produced noticeable results.

So when the announcement of the Rogue line came out in January, we took notice. The Rogue driver promised the distance of Epic in a more forgiving package. That would be one incredible combination if the Rogue could deliver.

Titleist 718 AP3 Irons Review

Titleist designed its all new AP3 to combine the best of the company’s popular AP1 and AP2 irons. Making an iron as long and forgiving as the AP1 that is also as workable and great feeling as the AP2 would create one great club. Is the AP3 all that? Well, I truly enjoyed finding out.

Titleist AP3 ironsThe Titleist iron line has traditionally skewed toward the “better” player. With the exception of the AP1, the brand’s irons favored workability and distance control over forgiveness. Previously, there was a pretty big jump from the everyman’s AP1 to the tour-popular AP2. Now Titleist has added a true “mid-AP” iron with the AP3, a “better players’ distance iron.”

Irons in this category are expected to deliver extra distance while still providing the feel and consistency that mid- to low-handicappers need.

Titleist bills the new AP3 iron as its longest and fastest player’s iron ever. The AP3, which fits between the AP1 and AP2, is intended to provide some of the forgiveness of the former with some of the shotmaking ability of the latter for players wanting more distance and forgiveness without sacrificing feel. Add one and two and you get three. Now the name makes sense!

AP3 truly represents the best of both worlds. We’re giving you the distance and forgiveness of a game improvement iron packed into the look and feel of a player’s iron.

Josh Talge, VP Marketing, Titleist Golf Clubs

That’s a pretty tall order. The AP1 is very popular among mid- and higher-handicap players (though the long irons sometimes find their way into the bags of better players). The AP1s strong suit is forgiveness and ease of getting the ball in the air. The AP2 is widely played on professional tours and by a sizable number of lower handicap players, where its feel and consistent distance pays dividends. Can the AP3 really combine the best of both worlds?

A New Twist: TaylorMade rolls out M3/M4

TaylorMade has released its M3 and M4 families of woods and irons. Twist Face Technology in the woods promises to help correct for off center contact, while RIBCOR is aimed at helping you get more distance with your irons.

Bag DropNow available in U.S. golf shops, TaylorMade’s M3 and M4 families feature technology packed woods, Rescues, and irons. Here is a slightly shortened version of the TaylorMade media release on the launch, starting with the drivers.

TaylorMade’s Twist Face technology, featured in both the new M3 & M4 drivers, is TaylorMade’s solution to counteract golfers’ most common misses, more specifically, those resulting from the high toe and low heel impacts.

To counteract the high-toe miss (a hook), the driver face has been “twisted” open (loft increased and face opened) on the high-toe to help straighten ball flight. Similarly, to counteract the low-heel miss (a slice) the driver face has been twisted closed to de-loft and close the face in the low heel area. Ultimately, TaylorMade’s Twist Face technology delivers a corrective face angle when hit off-center for longer, straighter shots.

Another Jailbreak: Callaway Launches Rogue

Jailbreak is back. Callaway’s Rogue drivers and fairway woods feature the technology. And the Rogue line doesn’t stop there… you can also get Rogue irons and hybrids to fill out your bag.

Bag DropBuilding on the success of its Epic line, Callaway is giving its new line of Rogue clubs an enhanced version of Jailbreak Technology in both the driver and, for the first time, the fairway woods. Plus, there are new irons and hybrids to accompany the line.

Mizuno JPX900 Driver Review

The Mizuno JPX900 driver delivers a ton of adjustability. Can it keep up with the top driver models this year? (You might be surprised.)

Mizuno JPX900 DriverThe Mizuno JPX900 is the brand?s performance counterpart to its game-improvement JPX-EZ (which I thought was a pretty decent game improvement driver). The 900 is lower spinning and more workable, and provides a wider range of adjustments to fit your swing. I mean a really wide range.

The 900 replaces the JPX850, a pretty solid, lower spinning driver that required a reasonably good swing to produce consistent results.

MedZone Activity Pak Review

Are aches and pains interfering with your enjoyment of the game? Medzone wants to help you swing pain free.

MedZone logoGolf is not the most strenuous of activities, but it nonetheless can generate a wide range of injuries. MedZone has over 15 years of experience in treating athletes in a variety of more intense sports, and is now promoting its products to the golf market.

I did spent a couple months using MedZone’s PainZone, BlisterZone, BurnZone, and ChafeZone products as needed to treat and prevent minor aches and pains. MedZone has packaged them nicely in a compact, easy-to-fit in the bag, Activity Pak, which makes it easy to take with you to the course.

Big Max Autofold FF Review

Just how quickly can you get your cart out of the car, unfolded and your bag loaded? The Big Max Autofold FF might be the cart to help you shave a few seconds off your best time.

The Big Max Autofold FF is fast into and out of the trunk.The Big Max Autofold is billed as fast, compact, and flat. In fact, it’s one of the flattest folding carts on the market.

I drive a hybrid car, and I can tell you that while the mileage is excellent, the trunk space sucks. When heading for the golf course, if it’s more than just me playing, it’s going to be a tough fit. I can get two carry bags in the trunk and possibly wedge in a push cart. If two of us have carts, one bag is going to wind up on the backseat, maybe both.

So when I got the opportunity to try out the Big Max Autofold FF, I jumped at the chance. If any cart could fold as flat as the Autofold promised, it would go a long way toward solving to my trunk dilemma.

Mizuno JPX-EZ Driver Review

When you name a club “EZ,” certain expectations are set. Can a company known for its forged irons deliver with a game improvement driver?

The Mizuno JPX-EZ promises forgiveness and low spin in a driver.Mizuno has long been known as being among the top, maybe even the, top brand for forged irons. In the last 10-15 years, Mizuno has expanded its iron line to include options for every skill level and playing style. For right or wrong, however, its metal woods options have almost always trailed the industry leaders in terms of public perception for their playability and technology.

Mizuno’s JPX-850 was a very solid driver. But it was distinctly geared to the “better” player, with too little spin to keep the ball in the air at lower swing speeds. The JPZ-EZ is a forgiving “game improvement” driver, but also promises lower spin.

With a name like EZ, you can bet this one is aimed at Joe Everyman Golfer. So, does it deliver on that game improvement promise? Read on to find out.

Voice Caddie VC300 GPS Review

A GPS unit with no display? The Voice Caddie 300 is a little like having an invisible caddie in your ear telling you how far to hit it.

The Voice Caddie 300 GPS… It'll talk to you!The first thing that strikes you about the Voice Caddie VC300 is that there is no screen… none. There have been several talking GPS rangefinders in the past, but the Voice Caddie line is the only one that comes to mind that doesn’t sport at least a small LCD screen to back up the voice output.

I was not sure what to think of that. Frankly, the idea of a talking GPS has always struck me as a little gimmicky. Having a glance at a screen just seems easier than pressing a button and listening to a virtual caddie give me the yardage.

Would my predisposition against talking GPS units sour me on the VC300? Just a few trips to the course would tell.