TaylorMade M2 Rescue Review

TaylorMade’s current marketing campaign is all about distance with forgiveness and the M2 Rescue definitely fits the bill.

TaylorMade M2 Rescue HeroFor a number of years, TaylorMade has been known to crank out one line of clubs after another in quick succession. The entire business model has turned off some golfers who were confused by the multiple offerings out or preferred to sit and wait for the newest line of clubs they know is coming just around the corner. TaylorMade has gone away from that lately, choosing instead to market fewer clubs than they have in the past. They now just have a high-end line, the M1, and the simpler (and cheaper) M2 lineup. This doesn’t mean the M2 clubs are inferior; they are still high performance clubs.

The M2 Rescue is a performer. I love hybrids; they need to be workhorses for me and I usually carry two in my bag at all times. I use them as long iron replacements and for teeing off when I don’t want to hit driver. I also like to use them to try and reach a short par five in two or to advance the ball out of the rough after an errant tee shot.

TaylorMade has produced some very good hybrids in the past. How does the M2 stack up to its predecessors? Let’s find out.

Volume Four Hundred Ninety-Two

In this week’s edition, we take a look at Rory McIlroy’s victory at TPC Boston.

Hittin the Links Welcome, Hittin’ the Links readers! We’re not halfway through the FedEx Cup Playoffs, with the events in New York and Boston down. The Tour heads west next week, to Crooked Stick and the BMW Championship. But first, we’ll take a look back at last week, and the Deutsche Bank, where Rory McIlroy won by two strokes over Paul Casey.

We’ll also look into Beef Johnston trying out for the PGA Tour, a few European golfers testing out some hickory-shafted clubs, and hear from Peter Kostis on the Rules of Golf. All that, plus your Weekly Woods Wrap-up.

Let’s hit the links!

Voice Caddie VC300 GPS Review

A GPS unit with no display? The Voice Caddie 300 is a little like having an invisible caddie in your ear telling you how far to hit it.

The Voice Caddie 300 GPS… It'll talk to you!The first thing that strikes you about the Voice Caddie VC300 is that there is no screen… none. There have been several talking GPS rangefinders in the past, but the Voice Caddie line is the only one that comes to mind that doesn’t sport at least a small LCD screen to back up the voice output.

I was not sure what to think of that. Frankly, the idea of a talking GPS has always struck me as a little gimmicky. Having a glance at a screen just seems easier than pressing a button and listening to a virtual caddie give me the yardage.

Would my predisposition against talking GPS units sour me on the VC300? Just a few trips to the course would tell.

The Curious Case of Jim Furyk

Jim Furyk’s recent play has warranted a deeper look as one Davis Love’s picks for the Ryder Cup. I explain why DL3 should look elsewhere.

Thrash TalkThe 58 shot by Jim Furyk earlier this year was pretty incredible. Yeah, he holed a shot, but even if you take that away he was going to be close and likely still would have shot 59, which is one small insignificant place below incredible. Pretty freaking awesome, maybe?

What it has done though is really made life a challenge for Davis Love III. To pick a forty-six year-old guy who at the start of this season was planning to help in an assistant coaching capacity is fraught with risk. Furyk’s Ryder Cup record is a train wreck. 10-20-4 for a winning percentage of .353. Among active golfers with more than fifteen matches played he is the worst. If you take a look at the all-time records of golfers with more than fifteen matches, only Curtis Strange at 6-12-2 with a win percentage of .350 is worse, and only by a few thousandths of a point. I hate to call out someone like this, but Jim Furyk is pretty awful when playing for his country against Europe.