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What are 'outside-in' and 'inside out' teaching methods?


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2" forward of where? Handle where? Armpit pressure where?

Dude, where ARE your armpits? Handle forward, uhm of the freaking ball?

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This will probably make more sense than the earlier posts I have made...

Ich möchte Ihnen die extraordinary golf Trainingmethode vorstellen.

Sie sollten wissen, dass es zwei Methoden gibt Golf zu unterrichten. Die „Herkömmliche“ ist meiner Meinung nach für viele Golfer wenig Erfolg versprechend, die „Extraordinary Golf” Trainingmethode dagegen überragend.

Die „herkömmliche“ Lehrmethode ist weit verbreitet und schließt endlosen Unterricht mit nur wenigen Verbesserungen ein. Lesen Sie das

Die überragende Lehrmethode ist viel einfacher zu verstehen und sobald verinnerlicht, nicht mehr zu vergessen.

Alle Menschen haben als Ergebnis der Millionen Jahre Evolution ein erstaunliches und hoch entwickeltes Lernsystem. Menschen sind sicher schlauer geworden!


I want you to imagine extraordinary golf training method .

You should know that there are two methods to teach golf . The "Traditional " is in my opinion for many golfers unlikely to be successful , the " Extraordinary Golf " training method, however, outstanding.

The " traditional " method of teaching is widespread and includes endless lessons with a few improvements . Read the

The superior teaching method is much easier to understand and once internalized , can no longer be forgotten.

All human beings have as a result of millions of years of evolution a remarkable and highly developed educational system . People have become smarter safe !

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Originally Posted by Patrick57

A baby dear learns to walk and run very quickly - within a couple of hours - but if you think our children learn these skills quickly then I must be missing something. A child learns many gross and fine motor skills in a short period of time but I wouldn't say either of them are learned quickly. Fine motor skills are certainly more precise but at basic level they are learned in similar time frames to gross skills. A professional runner dedicates as much time to the precision he requires for his skill as a professional violinist.

You may think you know this subject but your obnoxious answer above was just plain flawed. I mean,  gross motor skills can be learned quickly and with little repetition, I take it you have never had children or had a chance to witness how every single day of their infancy involves endless repetitions in the process of improving these skills.

So yes, I agree that your seem to have less knowledge on this subject than you led us to believe.  I also find your posts entertaining for the wrong reasons.

The average deer has a lifespan of about 5 and a half years.   Deer are capable of reproduction at 6 months of age.   A baby born on the same day as a deer will typically live multiple times as long and will not be capable of reproduction until well after the deer is dead.   Trying to draw a correlation between deer and humans is pretty ludicrous.

"A child learns many gross and fine motor skills in a short period of time but I wouldn't say either of them are learned quickly."   More double talk..........     The definiton of quick:

quick [kwɪk]

adj
1. performed or occurring during a comparatively short time

Inserting the definition of quick into your sentence, we now have the following:  "A child learns many gross and fine motor skills in a short period of time but I wouldn't say either of them are learned in a short time."    Doesn't make sense, does it?  You accuse me of having no knowledge of the topic, yet you don't even understand what you wrote..   THIS is the very reason I find your posts entertaining.    They are comical to read because they don't make sense.

Basic (or gross) motor skills are skills which use the large muscle groups and do not require extensive practice to master. Most basic motor skills are learned while children are very young.  Once mastered, barring physical injury or incapacitation, the skill level remains constant throughout the human's life, even with little to no practice.

Fine motor skills involve the coordination of multiple muscle groups (often in conjunction with the eyes) to perform tasks that are precise in nature. If not practiced regularly, the skill level will erode over time.

Those are the definitions of basic and fine motor skills.   Now, since you seem to think you know more about the topic than I, you tell me, which sounds more like the skill set required to properly swing a golf club?  I believe everyone else here can get it right....

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I am sitting here laughing at this. Where the hell has this post gone?? Deer? Really? What the hell does this have to do with golf. You need to be on a child development forum. You can repeat all you want about our natural ability to learn things(golf) as adults just as we learned the basic of walking as children. I get it. Everyone of us, unless there are handicapping conditions, all learned to walk. But not all of us could naturally be great golfers (or guitar players, or pro baseball players, or Mr. Universe) without training\practice. Some could learn it as a natural motion and pick it up easily, some would have to train and work at it and in doing so would have to learn from example and from being taught. Enough already...

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Originally Posted by teamroper60

Basic (or gross) motor skills are skills which use the large muscle groups and do not require extensive practice to master. Most basic motor skills are learned while children are very young.  Once mastered, barring physical injury or incapacitation, the skill level remains constant throughout the human's life, even with little to no practice.

Fine motor skills involve the coordination of multiple muscle groups (often in conjunction with the eyes) to perform tasks that are precise in nature. If not practiced regularly, the skill level will erode over time.

Those are the definitions of basic and fine motor skills.   Now, since you seem to think you know more about the topic than I, you tell me, which sounds more like the skill set required to properly swing a golf club?  I believe everyone else here can get it right....

I also think we should keep the deer out of this.

An important question here is,

Is golf a fine motor skill or gross or both?

Do we need big muscle control for golf?

Could this sport involve fine and gross motor skills?

If so what's your point?

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Originally Posted by Patrick57

I also think we should keep the deer out of this.

An important question here is,

Is golf a fine motor skill or gross or both?

Do we need big muscle control for golf?

Could this sport involve fine and gross motor skills?

If so what's your point?



You brought the deer up.

Look at those definitions of gross and fine motor skills again.  Pay particular attention to the part about practice and what happens to mastery of those skills in the absense of practice.   The answer should be obvious to you......

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Originally Posted by teamroper60

You brought the deer up.

Look at those definitions of gross and fine motor skills again.  Pay particular attention to the part about practice and what happens to mastery of those skills in the absense of practice.   The answer should be obvious to you......


I think you are going round in circles.

Gross skills are continually being used, so practice is on going. Fine skills like sowing, writing or tying shoelaces are no different. Like I said earlier, I don't think a violinist (fine motor) or a 100 metre sprinter (gross motor) can - at the same level of advancement - afford absence of practice.

At a mastery level practice is imperative whether that skill is gross or fine.

Just because you consider golf to be a very difficult skill to learn doesn't mean you can bend the standards for learning these skills to suit your argument.

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Originally Posted by Patrick57

I think you are going round in circles.

Gross skills are continually being used, so practice is on going. Fine skills like sowing, writing or tying shoelaces are no different. Like I said earlier, I don't think a violinist (fine motor) or a 100 metre sprinter (gross motor) can - at the same level of advancement - afford absence of practice.

At a mastery level practice is imperative whether that skill is gross or fine.

Just because you consider golf to be a very difficult skill to learn doesn't mean you can bend the standards for learning these skills to suit your argument.


Now you want to talk about sewing, writing, violinists and sprinters?   I showed you the very definitions of fine motor skills and gross motor skills.   If you can't grasp the obvious differences, then you are hopeless.   I am done...   At this point, I am just going to sit back, enjoy the humor and pity the fools taking lessons from you.

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