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MikeRanaldo

College of Golf at Keiser University

5 posts in this topic

I was just watching golf fitness videos on youtube, and came across the college of golf at keiser in Florida. does anybody have any experience with this school? or know anyone who does? i already have a bachelors degree in criminal justice from new york institute of technology, but i was looking into their associates degree in golf management. before NYIT i went to Albright college for 3 years before transferring. i got recruited to play golf at albright out of HS and i've always wondered if i could have a career in golf. Thanks guys

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Honeslty, if you want to get a career in golf get a job at a golf course. From there, you can figure out if you want to be a pro, manage golf operations or manage clubhouse operations. IMO it is better to start there and not become "over educated" for a position you may not be sure of. Plus, spending all the money on a degree to which you may never need is kind of pointless. I have several friends that work in the golf industry and that is where they started.

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An actual bachelors degree in PGM is not a bad thing to have. However, the PGA only recognizes 20 universities as who they associate with and Keiser isn't one of them. I go to National university and it doesn't fall under the 20, but I get 12 work credits for it and that helps a lot. Also I work at a private club, so I get to see both sides of the fence. If you just want to work at a golf course and go up the ladder that way that is fine, the PGM degree can open a door to two as well. There are so many different jobs in the industry it's hard to pick a career path. The club pro however is not the way to go unless you want to never have time to play. Lots of options out there. Go snoop around the PGA employment site and membership path. www.pga.com

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When you say you want a career in golf, what exactly do you mean? What do you picture as your "dream" job?

In my opinion, I think you should pursue another degree in sports turf management with a minor in business administration. This dual degree program would make you valuable for golf course operations or business administration.

You could probably also qualify for many of the big golf OEMs with a business administration degree in marketing or PR.

Personally, I think engineering/research development would be a good field to pursue.

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First, bear in mind that many of those who work in golf, rarely get to play golf. It's a great game and for some it is a great career. Keiser's programs seem mostly directed at instruction, training and shop operations. From that I assume your interests don't lie in being a superintendent or working in the OEM industry.

Keiser, I don't believe offers a PGA accredited program. See:

http://pgajobfinder.pgalinks.com/helpwanted/empcenter/pgaandyou/universities.cfm

That doesn't mean the program isn't good or valuable, but the PGA of America remains the gold standard for club pros. If all you are doing is looking to teach or become a golf trainer, then Keiser and other programs are great. I know there are some golf management programs that essentially are specialized business management programs. Those may be the best deal because if you want to leave golf, you won't be pigeon-holed.

I would recommend calling around and getting job working at a course this summer. That will give you a feel for the hours and the nature of the jobs. It's a lot more hospitality than it is any other avenue of study, but you do need a head for management, not just business aspects but also people. Even a small operation, you have to manage staff, outside personnel, interact with the superintendent, club manager, facilities, function, etc. The better the jobs the higher the pressure from your membership.

In my limited experience with club pro searches, usually three things standout (in this order):

  1. Experience - where are they now and does that membership view them.
  2. Playing ability - if you have some cred as a player, that always helps.
  3. Connections - if you previously worked somewhere, are a former member, or have relatives at a club, that help.
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