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Ricepr

graphite shafts to add distance in irons?

8 posts in this topic

OK, not much strength, recovering from a long illness. Distance is way down, even with burner 2.0 irons instead of 24 year old Wilson's. Say 130-135 carry for a 7 iron

I got 3-5 Taylormade rescue/hybrid, and love them. They go straighter and farther than the corresponding irons. Some of that of course is due to the fact the hybrids are longer, and the nature of the head.

But I still need to carry a 5 iron to fill a gap twixt the 5 hybrid and the 6 iron.

I would think graphite shafts might give me more swing speed -> more distance, and I could lose the 5 iron and carry another wedge?

Also the graphite shafts seem kinder to my 53 year old hands and elbows.

Thoughts?

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Graphite shafts should go you more clubhead speed because they are lighter than steel.

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Jump on a launch monitor with your steel shafts and compare them to a graphite iron - that may help you.

I am obtaining better distance with graphite in 80g graphite, but they also match what I need in flex - to make certain you don't lose accuracy and are consistent between clubs, get quality graphite and a club maker who knows what he is doing - I suggest you consider Aerotech Steelfiber shafts - Kuchar and Snedeker use them.  They are a graphite core surrounded by micro steel fibers. The lighter weights are i70 and i80. They tend to run firm to flex so if you consider them, get a good club maker who knows them.

good luck.

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Be careful when looking at new irons. Many of them are labeled a club less than old clubs were. A new 7 iron is really a 6 iron. Just one thing they are doing to make you think their clubs are longer now. But you have the right idea in filling in yardage coverage with your clubs. That is what you need to do. As far as graphite giving you more yardage. I'm afraid the only way to find out is to hit one of your clubs with the steel, switch the shaft and see what happens. That is really about the only way to really find out.

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Originally Posted by Willie Malay

Be careful when looking at new irons. Many of them are labeled a club less than old clubs were. A new 7 iron is really a 6 iron. Just one thing they are doing to make you think their clubs are longer now. But you have the right idea in filling in yardage coverage with your clubs. That is what you need to do. As far as graphite giving you more yardage. I'm afraid the only way to find out is to hit one of your clubs with the steel, switch the shaft and see what happens. That is really about the only way to really find out.

Absolutely true. Today's 7-iron was yesterday's 5 or 6 iron. It was a clever way to fool the public into buying a new set of irons, and the birth of the "gap wedge" - they simply ran out of numbers after the 9-iron. The set of King Cobras I had back then were jacked up that way. The equipment is longer today, but nowhere near what the numbers on the bottom of your irons would have you believe.

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Case in point. Cleveland makes the CG-16 and CG-16 Tour. A 6 in the "Tour" is 31 degrees. A 7 in the CG-16 is.....................31 degrees.  Go figure.

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Oh yeah, I looked at my new burner 2.0's compared to the 24 year old Wilson's. bout a club and a half difference in loft. I might try and find a store with graphite and steel 2.0's, or if they have one of them there carts where they can build clubs up.

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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

Jump on a launch monitor with your steel shafts and compare them to a graphite iron - that may help you.

I am obtaining better distance with graphite in 80g graphite, but they also match what I need in flex - to make certain you don't lose accuracy and are consistent between clubs, get quality graphite and a club maker who knows what he is doing - I suggest you consider Aerotech Steelfiber shafts - Kuchar and Snedeker use them.  They are a graphite core surrounded by micro steel fibers. The lighter weights are i70 and i80. They tend to run firm to flex so if you consider them, get a good club maker who knows them.

good luck.

Man, I want some Steelfiber's. They are so smooth. The technology is incredible.

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