or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › Finding FLO in Shafts
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Finding FLO in Shafts

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I just started playing around with finding the flo in shafts, but need some input from anyone using this method. I am placing a tip weigh which is 200 grams, then a laser device which is 62 grams. When I pull back the shaft and release it, how do I know when I have found the flo? Should the laser beam on my white background be moving perfectly going back and forth in a straight line or is it a line which appears to be pretty close to straight? 

Appreciate any help from club makers who FLO shafts. 

Lew

post #2 of 22

 

Give that a whirl.

post #3 of 22

FLO = Flat Line Oscillation.  So yes, a flat line, not one that oscillates in a circle or an oval.  Flat line back and forth, or up and down (however you have the shaft positioned in the clamp).

 

 

FLO found: 

 

spineFinding_FLOyes.jpg

 

FLO not found:

 

030405.gif

 

Wrong FLO:

 

flo.jpg

post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

 

I have now found the FLO on the shafts which are in my iron set.
 
How is the club face aligned once you have marked the FLO on the shaft?
 
There have been many discussions on this, but what is the general consensus on how to align the club head?
 
I remember Tim Hewitt of My Ostrich Golf saying align the FLO mark down the target line.
 
Lew
post #5 of 22

It's explained in the last few seconds in the video that is posted above. He is just doing it with a club head instead of a laser.  He marks the top, so 90 degrees from the FLO plane, and installs the shaft with that mark parallel to the club face.  As for aligning to the target line, that is usually just for spining.  It goes either DTL or 180 degrees opposite of that.  FLO is more accurate.


Edited by moparman426 - 2/15/12 at 10:50am
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonlew View Post

 

I have now found the FLO on the shafts which are in my iron set.
 
How is the club face aligned once you have marked the FLO on the shaft?
 
There have been many discussions on this, but what is the general consensus on how to align the club head?
 
I remember Tim Hewitt of My Ostrich Golf saying align the FLO mark down the target line.
 
Lew

Lew, I have to ask, are you lonely? You've asked this question at several other forums, one of which has some of the best club builders (Professional and amateur) around, but you continue to ask? Are you looking to see how many different answers you get or are you just looking for conversation?

I'm seriously curious.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 

LBlack14, I am simply trying to see what the best answer is for aligning a shaft that has been marked in the FLO position.

 

Once you have found the FLO, do you epoxy the clubhead with the FLO mark aligned at the 12:00 position as moparman426 states in his reply? I am just trying to get my set of irons and other clubs properly fit so I can hit the ball without any clubhead wobbling while coming into impact.

 

Lew

post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonlew View Post

 

Once you have found the FLO, do you epoxy the clubhead with the FLO mark aligned at the 12:00 position as moparman426 states in his reply? I am just trying to get my set of irons and other clubs properly fit so I can hit the ball without any clubhead wobbling while coming into impact.

 

Lew


It all depends on where you decided to put the mark when you actually FLO-ed them.  Did you mark the top, front, back, etc.....  If you were FLO-ing them in a horizontal pattern, like in the video, and marked the top (90 degrees from plane, like in the video), then yes, install that mark at 12 o'clock, parallel to the club face (that means in line with) like in the video.  I wouldn't intentionally try to steer you in wrong direction.

 

 

 

 

 

Just to add, I do this when I install any shaft.  I don't have a laser yet, so each shaft actually gets "FLO-ed" with the club head I intend to use it with.  It may not be as accurate (or maybe it is), but there is a noticeable difference when turning the shaft in the clamp.  I do it with a dummy grip installed, which is recommended.

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yes, when I find the FLO I place a piece of tape on the top of the shaft and make a straight line with a marker. So based on what you said, then the 12:00 position is the way the shaft should be installed in the club head, not at the 3:00 position.

 

Lew

post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 

Guys, thanks for you input. I now know exactly how to place the FLOed shafts in my iron heads.

 

Lew

post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiniBlueDragon View Post




Give that a whirl.
Can't access your site. Couple of questions.......

- Does this work equally well with irons? I can't see why not??

- I would assume that if the head isn't fitting snugly enough a bit of tape would do the trick.

Combined with a laser, this technique would seem to be superior to FLOing the shaft separately!
post #12 of 22
Ah huh, no tape. Maybe a single spline from a shim?
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BZCDR View Post

Ah huh, no tape. Maybe a single spline from a shim?

I don't understand the statement or question.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBlack14 View Post

I don't understand the statement or question.

Sorry....It was in reference to my question as to what to do if the head wasn't on tight......"Use a piece of tape?" But all I had to do was try tape to see that such doesn't even approximate a solution. I watched the clip again and saw him pick up something before putting the head on the shaft. Maybe a single leaf/spline from a shim.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by BZCDR View Post

Sorry....It was in reference to my question as to what to do if the head wasn't on tight......"Use a piece of tape?" But all I had to do was try tape to see that such doesn't even approximate a solution. I watched the clip again and saw him pick up something before putting the head on the shaft. Maybe a single leaf/spline from a shim.

Take a piece of rubber band. Wrap it long ways down one side, up the other around the tip and shove the head on. It's easy on, easy off and will hold the head in place when Flo-ing. Spine finder does not necessarily find spines, but NBP (Nuetral/Natural bend point). I usually align the NBP to target. The spine finder also will find residual bend if there's any. It's all about consistancy. I still haven't found any significance in performance no matter how the shafts are aligned.
post #16 of 22
PS- the word is "SPINE" not "spline". Just sayin'.
post #17 of 22
I found the spine of my TT DG S300 and the FLO. They always correlated. Maybe on some cheaper shafts it may vary.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LBlack14 View Post

Take a piece of rubber band. Wrap it long ways down one side, up the other around the tip and shove the head on. It's easy on, easy off and will hold the head in place when Flo-ing. Spine finder does not necessarily find spines, but NBP (Nuetral/Natural bend point). I usually align the NBP to target. The spine finder also will find residual bend if there's any. It's all about consistancy. I still haven't found any significance in performance no matter how the shafts are aligned.

Thanks for the tip. It worked great!

In order to solve the problem of my shaky workbench, I used three pieces of plywood with three bolts embedded/sandwiched in that match the bolt pattern on my vise. Then I just clamp it to the counter in the kitchen and it is solid as a rock!

image.jpg 1761k .jpg file
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Pro Shop › Clubs, Grips, Shafts, Fitting › Finding FLO in Shafts