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One Plane Swing

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I've decided to switch from a two-plane swing to more of a rotary/one plane swing because I'm not coordinated enough during the downswing to pull my right elbow down first (dig it in to my right hip) so that I can have that slight delay before the left hip can clear to avoid being "stuck." I would prefer to just initiate the downswing with a powerful left hip clear. I have heard that this is the benefit of the one-plane/rotary swing.  I know it won't be an easy road and there will be many ugly hooks along the way but enough is enough. It's too difficult to "time" the old fashioned two-plane swing. I want to try this body swing.   I just want to be able to explode with my hips (to initiate the downswing) and not get "stuck." I think the flatter swing will help with this goal.   Has anyone had success with the one-plane move? I understand that at the top of the swing there isn't as much weight on the right leg. It's more centered? 

post #2 of 8
To me it feels like you stay centered but you are still loaded into the right leg for power. Then all I do is start the downswing with the left hip. I'm sure there is a slight hip bump but not noticeable to me because I stayed more centered in the backswing. I try one plane because I battle: timing, hip sway. It is tough for me because I still get too handsy. There's my 2 cents from a high handicapper :)
post #3 of 8
Also, there are a few guys on tour that have one-plane swings that have success with it. Kuchar, Dufner, Byrd, Mahan? Just to name a few....
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutshot878 View Post

I've decided to switch from a two-plane swing to more of a rotary/one plane swing because I'm not coordinated enough during the downswing to pull my right elbow down first (dig it in to my right hip) so that I can have that slight delay before the left hip can clear to avoid being "stuck." I would prefer to just initiate the downswing with a powerful left hip clear. I have heard that this is the benefit of the one-plane/rotary swing.  I know it won't be an easy road and there will be many ugly hooks along the way but enough is enough. It's too difficult to "time" the old fashioned two-plane swing. I want to try this body swing.   I just want to be able to explode with my hips (to initiate the downswing) and not get "stuck." I think the flatter swing will help with this goal.   Has anyone had success with the one-plane move? I understand that at the top of the swing there isn't as much weight on the right leg. It's more centered? 

I think a One-plane backswing is the way to go.  

 

But you have a misconception on the amount of weight that is on the right leg at the top of the backswing.  The weight - even in a centered pivot swing - the weight is definitely on the right side in the backswing.  Checkout this video by Golf Evolution - which is a snip from the 5SK videos.

 

 

One plane swing is simply getting the left arm in line with the shoulder line in the backswing.  I think the benefit is that you are going to keep the club on plane in the back swing - and it is easier to get the shaft loaded into the proper slot on the down swing.

 

But in summary... Weight distribution is roughly....

 

1.) 50/50 to 60/40 (left/right) at address.

2.) 35/65 to 25/75 (left/right) at the top.

3.) 80/20 or more (left/right) at impact.... Some pros are measured at 90+% of their weight left at impact.

4.) 90/10 or more (left/right) at finish.

 

The key is to get the weight on your left side at impact.  But a lot of folks were lead to believe that your weight was on your left side at the top.  The thing that Swing Catalyst has shown is that it is actually on the right leg.  Think about it - this is where the club and arms are on the backswing - so it makes sense that the pressure and force is in the right side moreso than the left.  As it is loading up.

 

You still want to have extension of that right side though in the backswing - and may actually look like your spine is tilting to the left... But weight is definitely right.


Edited by Beachcomber - 1/29/13 at 7:03pm
post #5 of 8

Nice post Beach!  Yes a more centered pivot will tend to makes things easier, especially hitting the ball first.  Best way to work on a "one plane" swing is to put tees in each arm pit and keep the head in the center of your stance on the backswing.  For those that don't know, one plane is a Jim Hardy reference, not referring to actually swinging back and forth on a single plane but having the left arm and the shoulders parallel to each other at the top of the backswing.

post #6 of 8

awesome video, and i like were he shows the whole back leg straightening out. But it really shows how much weight is in the forward leg. Its something i need to work on, because i played golf with my upper center doing the reverse weight shift in the golf swing, due to years of poor ball alignment. 

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachcomber View Post

But you have a misconception on the amount of weight that is on the right leg at the top of the backswing.  The weight - even in a centered pivot swing - the weight is definitely on the right side in the backswing.  Checkout this video by Golf Evolution - which is a snip from the 5SK videos.

 

To be clear, that video shows pressure. When Dave makes a centered backswing and pauses (so pressure = weight), we see about 55/45 favoring the trail side. According to people who have used a lot of pressure plates, etc. they've said most people with a fairly centered pivot (i.e. perhaps not Keegan Bradley hitting a driver, even though he re-centers a little) fit between 55% one way or the other at A4 when you consider "weight."

 

No PGA Tour players have more pressure on their front foot before anything changes direction, however.

post #8 of 8

I have a one plane action bought the book and also like to refer to Jeff Ritter's vids. While it has unquestionably got me striking the ball with a very controllable ballflight, it has hurt me a bit too. The advice you can turn as hard as you want from the top and if you are strong and athletic it will suit you has worked against me.

 

Probably because I had no one to correct my faults it has led me to being too aggressive,too much right hand pressure,also going hard from the top led to throwing my hands forward so fat contacts,and struggling with holding the posture lifting up was a particular culprit.

 

So it has taken me a few years really to get realistic with my golf. Slowing up my quick backswing and not being in any rush to reverse the gears in the transition. I'm now striking it more consistently. I had stopped playing golf as I don't play that regulary but came back with less expectation and a new approach on how to practise my swing. I do some practise every day now only choosing to work on one thing at a time.

 

I'm pretty strong not as flexible as I would like but when you hit a one plane swing solid you can really compress the ball with very little lateral movement. It looks a simple swing but it's hard physically to restrain certain extra movements which you don't need. It's like any other method of golf methodology to me,you can't muscle a golf ball out there,it's getting your sequence to fire correctly.

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