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dagolfer

Wedge ?

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So after i upgrade my iron i figure i might as well get new wedges also. I currently have a two wedge set up. A 48* pw and a 56* sw. This is pretty much how i play 70 - 120 yrds is pw and then 60 and in is sw. However, upon demoing a vokey 56* wedge it seems i just slip right under the ball and all it is good for is greenside chipping and bunker play. I also demoed a 52* and felt i had to swing rather hard to hit it 100 yrds. I like to have a nice smooth 100 yrd club. So my question is how about a 50* pw and then a 54* wedge for those say 30 45 50 60 yrd shots and then sw for the close stuff? Do those gaps sound okay for the "symptoms" i am describing?
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If Acuity has a 52º GW, check it out. That way you'd have matching wedges, with 4º loft difference between. This would make it easier to set up a consistent distance yardstick for your partial wedge shots.

Your current eight degrees between wedges is a big gap, unless you're a real touch player.

My bag setup is different, but I want to play it out this season. May add 54º and 58º if current mix doesn't work out.
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I also demoed a 52* and felt i had to swing rather hard to hit it 100 yrds. I like to have a nice smooth 100 yrd club. So my question is how about a 50* pw

Good luck. A lot of pros go with PW, 54, 60. If my SW was a 54*, I'd go that route as well.

Instead, I'm in the process of deciding on a PW/GW right now. I think the MP-11 PW that I had bent to 50* is still a bit too long to comfortably hit it from 90-130. I have a 52* Vokey, and I'm pretty comfortable, distancewise, from 80-125, but something about the face leads to occasional alignment issues. It has the oilcan "finish" and all my other clubs are chrome or satin finish. I tend to hit other wedges more on line, but don't necessarily dial in the distance as well. Matching wedges is a lifelong process.
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I want to get rid of the acuity wedges. THat is the whole point of new wedges. So my question still lies would 50, 54, 56 or 58 work nicely? I also want to state that the vokey i demoed the vokey for a "slider" types swing. I felt i slid under the ball too much. Should i get the "digger" bounce or the medium one. And i also like to open up my 56 face alot so should i just go 58* and solve the "problem."
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I want to get rid of the acuity wedges. THat is the whole point of new wedges. So my question still lies would 50, 54, 56 or 58 work nicely?

Look at some PGA Tour pros' WITB data - you'll see a lot of PW, 54, 60 in the winners circle. They're not off-the-shelf wedges, but you can get almost anything bent and ground a little bit.

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I want to get rid of the acuity wedges. THat is the whole point of new wedges. So my question still lies would 50, 54, 56 or 58 work nicely? ...

If you get a 50-54-58 in matching wedges, this gives you 4* between clubs and would make it easier to set up your mental "distance card" for partial swings.

Or, a 48-52-56 might work if you don't want a lob wedge. If you think you want Vokey, the Vokey website give contains a wedge selection program depending on how you swing. Last time I looked, Vokey had six different "sole grinds" and lots of different lofts and bounces for each. Also, a couple of posters from this winter who use a 58* said it was a "safer" club to hit than 60* or above.
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Im thinking 50, 54, 58. The 50 degree will be the wedge that comes with the ap1 set i believe and then 54 and 58 vokey. I like to open up the 56 face so why not just get a 58 instead. Also the wedge i demoed was for the "slider" swing. And i felt i was doing just that, sliding right under the ball. Does this mean i am a "digger" or should ijust get the one for "either"?

Now i just need to decide whether to get the cc vokeys or the normal. I know i know, don't worry about the grooves but if my irons have the diff grooves why not covert all at once. Adapt, improvise, and overcome is my philosophy. Might as well learn how it all works now.
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First thing you should never take a full swing with a wedge, your asking for trouble if you do. For a 100 yard club if you hit you pitching wedge 120 like you said it sounds like an easy pitching wedge is that club. For the rest of the wedges you have room for three wedges. I think wedge sets should start with the most lofted wedge down, so lets say you want a 60* that means if you have a 48* Pitching wedge you have 12* to fill with two wedges so a 52* and 56* should workout just fine. You said in one of your posts that you like to open the face a 56* wedge to make a lob wedge, you shouldn't get into that habit your making an easy shot with a lob wedge complicated... Lastly go with the old grooves, c'mon golf isn't an easy game take all the help you can get!
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Check out rockbottomgolf. They have some great deals on wedges right now. May have what you need. I saw a Callaway X forged for 49$. They also had Nickent forged wedges for 29$. Nike and others too.
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Im thinking 50, 54, 58. The 50 degree will be the wedge that comes with the ap1 set i believe and then 54 and 58 vokey. I like to open up the 56 face so why not just get a 58 instead. Also the wedge i demoed was for the "slider" swing. And i felt i was doing just that, sliding right under the ball. Does this mean i am a "digger" or should ijust get the one for "either"?

you had a wedge with little bounce, try one with more bounce

and stick with the old grooves, no point making things harder for yourself
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anything by vokey, cleveland or callaway, imo the 3 best wedge companies. and get custom fitted, shouldnt cost you anything & will help you decide. Personally I have 6* between my wedges (48 54 60) as I know my yardages with each one.
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