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Shallowing the angle of attack

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I am looking for any tips that will help be to achieve a shollower angle of attack at impact. My current angle of attack is very steep. Although I generally come from the inside the angle of the shaft on the downswing is very steep. After impact the club head tends to move sharply left, results in deep divots that aim slightly left.

Prior to impact I do achieve a good inside path but because of the steepness of the angle of attack and because my body in particular the shoulders tend to unwind very fast if I don't hold the supination of the left wrist through impact I fail to strike the ball correctly.

My swing is therefore totally reliant on timing/luck plus manipulation of the hand action through impact in order to strike the ball crisply.

I have indentified my faults to be:

A slightly shut clubface at the top of the swing.

A slightly flat backswing.

A occasional tendancy to aim left.

These problems I can and am solving myself but the following problems I am struggling with.

Firstly stopping the shoulders unwinding to quickly. I need something to get me to achieve square or squarer shoulders at impact.

And finally to reduce the knee flex through impact.
post #2 of 10

I can relate...

I have the same problem. I have lost some distance as a result. I wish i could provide you with a tip or solution but i am in the same boat as you. .........I'm curious......How are you hitting your Driver? I used to have a nice boring trajectory and hit it about 300yrd easy, but now due to this swing problem the flight of the ball is very high.....

Jaeden

p.s. lemme know if you've figured it out

I am looking for any tips that will help be to achieve a shollower angle of attack at impact. My current angle of attack is very steep. Although I generally come from the inside the angle of the shaft on the downswing is very steep. After impact the club head tends to move sharply left, results in deep divots that aim slightly left.

Prior to impact I do achieve a good inside path but because of the steepness of the angle of attack and because my body in particular the shoulders tend to unwind very fast if I don't hold the supination of the left wrist through impact I fail to strike the ball correctly.

My swing is therefore totally reliant on timing/luck plus manipulation of the hand action through impact in order to strike the ball crisply.

I have indentified my faults to be:

A slightly shut clubface at the top of the swing.

A slightly flat backswing.

A occasional tendancy to aim left.

These problems I can and am solving myself but the following problems I am struggling with.

Firstly stopping the shoulders unwinding to quickly. I need something to get me to achieve square or squarer shoulders at impact.

And finally to reduce the knee flex through impact.[/QUOTE]
post #3 of 10
I'll take a crack at it.

If you have a slightly flat backswing and are steep on the ball, you must be coming over the top a little bit. Even if you don't feel like it, when you start to "unwind your shoulders" too fast, your hips will follow and change the plane of your swing. Take a club and take your stance. Now take a 3/4 slow motion swing and hold it at the top. Hold that plane angle. Now as turn your hips to the left while freezing the club and shoulders. Look back and see how your plane moved to a steep position. Turning early or "spinning out" throws the club off plane, making you steep and pointed left. The only way you can hit the ball straight as you see it is to manipulate the club with your wrists. I'm just guessing but I bet you hit either a boring trajectory left of target or skinned high drifter slightly right. My son had some of the same problems and after the video was compared to E Ells and C Howell, we could really see it. The video was done by Ed Loar of the Ledbetter academy. The pro's are more "stacked" over the ball as they start the downswing. The one thing they seem to have in common is, their hips don't turn much until after they make contact.

Do you practice your lobb wedge a lot? That is the typical move used in a lobb of 15yds and in. Sometimes you carry that to your long game.

I know that's confusing, but think about it. Hope it helps. Check out my sight if you want. You might find some information that'll help you visualize.

Dan
post #4 of 10
Went to the 2012 PGA Tour Q-School at Southern Hills Plantation in Brooksville, FL(in the middle of nowhere, 50 miles north of Tampa....what we used to call BFE) on Nov 17th, 2012. I watched the leaders who were in the final group. I watched them play their final 9 holes on the back nine. About 4,000 yards of long, long, long, long, super long, holes that require surgical drives of at least 300 yards to have any chance at shooting below par. I watched Robert Karlsson, Arjun Atwal and Brian Duncan (a Clemson University stand out and e-tour player who hits it a country mile). This is what I learned from them. THEY ATTACK the BALL from the INSIDE. who else are they gonna hit 8 irons 170 yards into the wind. You need a draw (lower spin) into wind. They use centrifugal force. They ride the wind. They don't hold against the wind and lose all their distance---a shot that might require a lower ball flight. They smash down on the ball, compress the holy crap out of their poor little soft Titleist Pro-V-1 and that orb shoots straight up to the stratosphere. The sound of that soft ball being compressed with an extra stiff steel shaft against the center of a forged blade clubface will make you nearly orgasm.

've been to the Players Championship (at Sawgrass) about 6 times. But there's just something so intimate about watching these guys when there are no annoying volunteers and ropes and crowd noise. It's amazing how quiet these players are. How most of the time they're waiting for their playing partner to hit his shot. How silent they are. They're in a kind of trance. They communicate to each other with their golf shots. They let their games do the talking. They are Zen Masters of their craft and for someone like myself who has been worshiping in the sacred temple of golf for 33 years (since I was ten years old and since golf offered me a refuge after losing my mother to cancer when I was ten) it is a spiritual experience to watch them at their craft. The complete mastery. The complete focus. Most of them are introverts. Personalities that fit the game well. For them perhaps this life of solitude (obsessive, constant thoughts of the swing and of the game). But a few of them are obvious extroverts. Arjun Atwal for example did not seem so locked in and oblivious to everything around him (everything not golf). He made occasional eye contact with the two or three spectators watching him that day. Okay, enough psycho babble. I learned more about my swing and about what I had to do to properly hit the golf ball from watching them for two hours than watching YouTube videos for 1200 hrs. Bottom Line: They take the club inside and strike the ball from the inside. That's where the power is. From the inside. If I hear another hacker at the golf course tell me I'm taking it back "too inside" I think I will unload on him and tell him about my day at PGA Tour Q-school watching these players hit nothing but high powerful draws into a stiff wind. That's right, very high irons into wind. They didn't punch the shots down (the greens were too fast for that kind of trajectory) and hold off. They attacked from the inside with power and using centrifigal force. Gravity. If they needed a cut, they simply weakened or neutralized their left hand grip. They didn't change their whole swing arc. The end.
post #5 of 10

Take a look at your head movement on video.  I find that when my AoA gets too steep its because my head moves towards the target durning the downswing.

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cutshot878 View Post

Went to the 2012 PGA Tour Q-School at Southern Hills Plantation in Brooksville, FL(in the middle of nowhere, 50 miles north of Tampa....what we used to call BFE) on Nov 17th, 2012. I watched the leaders who were in the final group. I watched them play their final 9 holes on the back nine. About 4,000 yards of long, long, long, long, super long, holes that require surgical drives of at least 300 yards to have any chance at shooting below par. I watched Robert Karlsson, Arjun Atwal and Brian Duncan (a Clemson University stand out and e-tour player who hits it a country mile). This is what I learned from them. THEY ATTACK the BALL from the INSIDE. who else are they gonna hit 8 irons 170 yards into the wind. You need a draw (lower spin) into wind. They use centrifugal force. They ride the wind. They don't hold against the wind and lose all their distance---a shot that might require a lower ball flight. They smash down on the ball, compress the holy crap out of their poor little soft Titleist Pro-V-1 and that orb shoots straight up to the stratosphere. The sound of that soft ball being compressed with an extra stiff steel shaft against the center of a forged blade clubface will make you nearly orgasm.
've been to the Players Championship (at Sawgrass) about 6 times. But there's just something so intimate about watching these guys when there are no annoying volunteers and ropes and crowd noise. It's amazing how quiet these players are. How most of the time they're waiting for their playing partner to hit his shot. How silent they are. They're in a kind of trance. They communicate to each other with their golf shots. They let their games do the talking. They are Zen Masters of their craft and for someone like myself who has been worshiping in the sacred temple of golf for 33 years (since I was ten years old and since golf offered me a refuge after losing my mother to cancer when I was ten) it is a spiritual experience to watch them at their craft. The complete mastery. The complete focus. Most of them are introverts. Personalities that fit the game well. For them perhaps this life of solitude (obsessive, constant thoughts of the swing and of the game). But a few of them are obvious extroverts. Arjun Atwal for example did not seem so locked in and oblivious to everything around him (everything not golf). He made occasional eye contact with the two or three spectators watching him that day. Okay, enough psycho babble. I learned more about my swing and about what I had to do to properly hit the golf ball from watching them for two hours than watching YouTube videos for 1200 hrs. Bottom Line: They take the club inside and strike the ball from the inside. That's where the power is. From the inside. If I hear another hacker at the golf course tell me I'm taking it back "too inside" I think I will unload on him and tell him about my day at PGA Tour Q-school watching these players hit nothing but high powerful draws into a stiff wind. That's right, very high irons into wind. They didn't punch the shots down (the greens were too fast for that kind of trajectory) and hold off. They attacked from the inside with power and using centrifigal force. Gravity. If they needed a cut, they simply weakened or neutralized their left hand grip. They didn't change their whole swing arc. The end.

I can assure you if they were hitting draws, they were swinging inside out.  Unless they were hitting hooks or pulls - or straight into a hard right to left wind which would force the ball to draw.  Check out this topic....

http://thesandtrap.com/b/playing_tips/ball_flight_laws

post #7 of 10

Check out this thread too.

 

http://thesandtrap.com/t/54238/elbow-position-and-its-effects-on-the-downswing

 

I worked on this a lot this year and it shallowed my attack angle and gave me more consistent path and divot position.  My ball flight is higher too.

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LinksMaster View Post

I am looking for any tips that will help be to achieve a shollower angle of attack at impact. My current angle of attack is very steep. Although I generally come from the inside the angle of the shaft on the downswing is very steep. After impact the club head tends to move sharply left, results in deep divots that aim slightly left.

Prior to impact I do achieve a good inside path but because of the steepness of the angle of attack and because my body in particular the shoulders tend to unwind very fast if I don't hold the supination of the left wrist through impact I fail to strike the ball correctly.

My swing is therefore totally reliant on timing/luck plus manipulation of the hand action through impact in order to strike the ball crisply.

I have indentified my faults to be:

A slightly shut clubface at the top of the swing.

A slightly flat backswing.

A occasional tendancy to aim left.

These problems I can and am solving myself but the following problems I am struggling with.

Firstly stopping the shoulders unwinding to quickly. I need something to get me to achieve square or squarer shoulders at impact.

And finally to reduce the knee flex through impact.


a good golf coach...and 12 months to rebuild what he teaches you,

daily practice for 1 hour for every small change to your swing for a month.....nothing comes easy a1_smile.gif

post #9 of 10

Resurrecting a 7 year old thread..... that might just be a record.

post #10 of 10

The farther you stand from the ball, the shallower your angle of attack will be. The closer you are to the ball, the steeper you will be. Have you tried simply standing farther from the ball? You could experiment with it. If I'm in the woods and I need a low draw I stand farther from the ball and this shallows out my swing path, makes it much flatter etc. 

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