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Grndslmhttr3

Rust Spots on shafts

14 posts in this topic

Is there a way to prevent rust spots from getting on your shafts? I just noticed that all of my iron shafts have rust spots on them.
Also, is steel wool effective in removing the rust, or is there a better way?
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Keep them clean and dry, store them in a dry place. Leave the bag in a insulated room, not an uninsulated garage f.i.
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Keep them clean and dry, store them in a dry place. Leave the bag in a insulated room, not an uninsulated garage f.i.

Then I guess leaving them in my garage all winter was a bad idea. :|

Is there a way to determine whether or not the rust is just surface rust, and has not damaged the actual shaft?
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Can you scrape it off with your nails, a tee, something made of plastic? I don't think surface rust matters much, but if it's gotten deep it could affect the club.
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Is there a way to determine whether or not the rust is just surface rust, and has not damaged the actual shaft?

Unless the shaft is deeply pitted, there is not going to be any damage that would result in shaft failure. Light surface rust will be easily removed with just a pass or two of fine steel wool. If you have to rub vigorously then you might have pitting that is deep enough to be concerned with.

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2 suggestions

1. something in your bag is rusting and staining the shafts from the outside

2. the rust may be coming from the inside of the shaft through the chrome.
If you can scrape off any chrome with your finger nail to reveal the rust then you may have to have clubs reshafted as they will start breaking
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Rust is usually a result of moist conditions and changing of temperature. If you have a big enough rust attack that it comes from the inside you can just throw away the clubs.

With the clubs in an uninsulated garage the temperature will swing during the winter. This creates a moist environment, and water is the main catalyst for the rusting process. Water penetrate the microscopic pits and cracks in the metal. The chemical formula for water is H²O, the O stands for oxygen. So now you've got oxygen penetrating the cracks in your irons, the oxygen atoms will combine with the metallic atoms which will form oxide compound, rust.

Sodium will speed up this process, sodium is something you can find in saltwater, which is why iron rusts faster near the coast or salty environment. So, for those of you who live by the coast, keeping the clubs dry is even more important. All shafts I've seen is made of stainless steel, so you'll rarely get the deep rust attacks, but surface rust can always occur. I live by the sea and have 4-5 sets of golf clubs with variable quality, all stored inside, dry and warm, have never seen any signs of rust.

A wet bag will provide some moist, but unless you dip it in water regularly, it should not be a problem. If you store it inside over night, the moist will dampen and you won't have a problem with rust.
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I used a metal divot tool to scrape the rust, and it almost completely scratches off, but there are small stains on the shafts.
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Hard to tell without seeing the club, but I doubt there will be any problems with the club. If you're worried you could always take a picture. Surface rust which is easily scraped off doesn't affect the integrity of the club.
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I used a metal divot tool to scrape the rust, and it almost completely scratches off, but there are small stains on the shafts.

If the stains are on the chrome, you're most likely OK to go.

If the chrome seems to be "loose" or nonexistent, you might want to start stashing away some funds to replace them.
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Hard to tell without seeing the club, but I doubt there will be any problems with the club. If you're worried you could always take a picture. Surface rust which is easily scraped off doesn't affect the integrity of the club.

Just found some fine steel wool and it took all the rust off no problem. Thanks.

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Just found some fine steel wool and it took all the rust off no problem. Thanks.

Then you're good to go.

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Just found some fine steel wool and it took all the rust off no problem. Thanks.

Now get your Turtle wax and give them a quick buffing. I kid you not.
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heads may be stainless steel. shafts are chrome over steel. the chromium does not rust. if the chrome can be scraped away from under the rust then reshaft your heads. if the rust can be rubbed off and the chrome is intact then something in your bag is rusting and staining the shafts.
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