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"The Stack and Tilt Swing: The Definitive Guide..." by Andy Plummer and Mike Bennett

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I've heard that Mike and Andy aren't 100% pleased with the book, just as they weren't 100% pleased with the Golf Digest articles.

In the book, for example, instead of using a few terms from The Golfing Machine, they had to "dumb them down" and say things like "uncock the left wrist" and stuff.

FWIW, the power accumulators are:

1 - Bending and straightening of right arm
2 - Cocking and uncocking of the left wrist
3 - Turn and roll of the angle between the club shaft and the left forearm
4 - Angle formed by the left arm and the left shoulder

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Looking forward to hearing comments on this book. Can someone say if this book is better than the S&T; dvd? I cannot find a golf pro teaching S&T; where I live and would like to give it a try.

I've been reading in this forum some of the threads on the S&T; swing and am practicing the moves at the range. I'm having better results (same distance but much better flight control and better contact) than with the traditional weight shift swing (power pivot).

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This is just a question, but has the book not been released yet? Looks like another 10days for the hard cover.

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This is just a question, but has the book not been released yet? Looks like another 10days for the hard cover.

Yep, 10 days. I just wanted to start the thread ahead of time in case I'm too busy reading to remember to start it.

I pre-ordered for my Kindle.

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Amazingly (given some of my posts here and abouts), this is on my Christmas list as of a couple of days ago - thanks Iacas for encouraging(?!) me to see the error of my ways .

Been trawling the S&T; threads here and elsewhere and am interested enough to hear it from the guru's mouths. I have a feeling it's codifying some stuff I took for granted and I'm hopeful there'll be a lot more that's useful. I think I have more issue with some of the classical instructors given what it's apparent what a lot of people are encouraged to do and I can hardly comment properly on something without trying it first now can I? Should be an interesting Winter.

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Amazingly (given some of my posts here and abouts), this is on my Christmas list as of a couple of days ago - thanks Iacas for encouraging(?!) me to see the error of my ways

Glad to hear it. Worst case, you'll gain some actual knowledge of a new type of swing, and even if you like only one or a few pieces, it may help.

BTW, some people who had ordered it on Barnes and Noble's website (bn.com) have reported actually getting their copies already. D'oh. I'll be waiting another 8 days for my Kindle version to be available. I pre-ordered.

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Yep, 10 days. I just wanted to start the thread ahead of time in case I'm too busy reading to remember to start it.

Aha .... running a forum

should have a few associated perks and priviliges. This would be one.

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The review I posted at Barnes and Noble:

Source: My Review
I've played to a low single digit handicap for years, and though I enjoyed the process of working on my own swing, I'd go through lengthy periods of time when I was searching for the key to my swing. Invariably, I'd find something, play well for a few rounds, and then enter another lull.

This year I decided to work with a Stack and Tilt instructor. Like many, I misunderstood a lot of the principles and had a lot of misconceptions about the swing, but with 20 or so PGA Tour players taking to it, I reconsidered. I'm glad I did - this year has been one of the most productive in my golf career. Not only do I know how to swing, I know how to fix it when things go awry.

Stack and Tilt is a fairly simple method of playing good golf, but nobody can do it alone. If you can't find an instructor nearby, this book does a great job as a stand-in (and if you can find an instructor, this book is a great reminder between lessons). The book's photos wonderfully illustrate the concepts and the instructions are simple, clear, and concise. Not only are the positions and ideas explained thoroughly, but PGA Tour pros contribute their "feelings" and "sensations" to help players who are helping themselves.

The book is more than a "here is how to swing the club" guide as well. The last third of the book is invaluable to golfers as it contains drills, common faults and their fixes, and much more. This book does more to actually help the golfer in 240 or so pages than most golf instructional books do in 400. It's not much of a stretch to call this potentially the most beneficial golf instruction book since Hogan's "Five Lessons."

Even if you're not a fan of the Stack and Tilt swing, I encourage you to pick up this book. Read the first chapter - I think you may change your mind. Implement some of the principles of the swing and, when you start beating your buddies, the book will pay for itself in no time.

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That's quite the endorsement. Maybe I'll pick up a copy and see what it does to my game - if I can find a suitable instructor.

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I've been reading tour tempo, once I'm done w/ that I will have to pick this book up and go through it.

Any instruction is better than no instruction

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Obviously there will be those out there that may believe, because of my friendship with Mike and Andy, my book review will be biased in some way. I can assure you that is not the case. That said...golfers everywhere are going to love this book...and, I predict, read it again and again!

Why? Because it doesn't matter whether or not potential readers think Stack and Tilt is for them - this book IS GOING TO provide a wake up call to golfers and instructors everywhere. No longer can the local PGA pro hide behind "veiled" information. Golfers who have read this book will want more. It is very purposely written in a simple to understand way meant to show readers, not only the pattern, but how the greats of the game have applied these principles.

Andy and Mike have laid out, step by step, how golfers can learn to control where they strike the ground (ball first), how to control the curve on the ball and how to hit the ball far enough to play great golf. Now all of us here KNOW that there is SO MUCH MORE to Stack and Tilt but these are the most important things any golfer can understand. It has been very well explained that the the laws of Geometry and Physics rule! Get the book, digest it, and understand the principles. You will be a better player for it.

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stack and tilt works but isn't all great. my boss, a pga teaching pro, said that it's as if your doing a reverse pivot, just prefecting it. well, to me, it makes sense considering you can hit the ball straight and far, but in my mind, i believe it serves a benefit to golfers who's golf swing is a reverse pivot....

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stack and tilt works but isn't all great. my boss, a pga teaching pro, said that it's as if your doing a reverse pivot, just prefecting it. well, to me, it makes sense considering you can hit the ball straight and far, but in my mind, i believe it serves a benefit to golfers who's golf swing is a reverse pivot....

It's not a reverse pivot. Your PGA pro should educate himself before making disparaging remarks.

In a reverse pivot, your weight goes forward and then ends up on your rear foot. In Stack and Tilt, your weight stays forward (in reality it moves back a little, but it doesn't "feel" that way), then moves further forward coming down. There's never any real shift to the right (for a righty) like you'd find in a reverse pivot. You should pick up a copy of the book and read it for yourself. I think you'll surprise yourself, and at the very least, you'll be able to point out why you're pro is full of it.

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amazing book. plummer bennett are pure genius and dahlquist, sieracki & dave are way ahead of the curve. keep up the good work and showing how oldschool golf is just that - OLD

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