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ezmorningrebel

help with swing that's gone too far inside-out

12 posts in this topic

when i started out i had a really over the top, steep swing. i worked to correct it by widening my takeaway and keeping my right arm tucked in. it seems now that i've gone too far the other way. i'm drawing my irons really well but my driver is a different story. most of my drives are pull hooks, every once in a while i don't close the club face and hit a huge push. i've tried weakening my grip but it seems to lead to inconsistency.

any tips on finding that middle ground? maybe a specific thing to work on next time i'm at the range? thanks for any help.
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Have you checked to see if your stance is closed with the driver? When I was battling the hooks(mostly with my driver), that was a common fault for me. From some reason I didn't have that problem with irons.

My other miss was also a block, and weakening my grip produced a straight push or a push with about a 3 yard fade. I messed around with that grip a little bit, but felt more comfortable using my normal grip as hitting a big push or a push fade got me in alot of trouble on the course.
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Im working on swinging with an inside to out path to avoid a slice. I keep my right elbow flying away from me, and then drop it back in to my side on the downswing. I'd say try letting your elbow get away from you on the takeaway, and lessening the angle in which you come in from the inside. If that makes any sense.
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I would not suggest weakening the grip any more than having your left thumb at about 1:00 O'Clock on the handle and the V's at least between the right ear and right shoulder. The problem is likely a handsy swing, flipping the club. I am only guessing but you can check your swing with one simple test... move the ball forward, and if you can still get a divot in front of the ball with an iron then you are shifting weight well and your inside-out swing should turn more down the line. An inside-out swing that hangs back through impact will not allow you to hit shots with, say, a 7 iron played off the instep of the left foot. However, if you are shifting and turning well, and can hit a good shot with the ball well forward and still produce a forward divot, then your mechanics are pretty good. Try that test. Then when the ball is flying pretty straight, take out your driver and play it forward with a square face alignment and hit balls until you get that same feel of bottoming out well forward. I know it sounds funny to fix the driver problem first with iron shots, but that seems to work for me.

I am sort of plagued by coming from too inside myself, and if I go to the range and practice with a more forward ball position until the flight is straight, that will generally fix my swing (for a while anyway.) Be sure and finish in balance as well. Don't be discouraged by the first few shots going hard left, just keep working on it until you get it going straight.

The fact you mention pull hooking strongly suggests you are not posting forward enough and are letting the hands flip rather than getting shifted and turned. Weakening your grip will only make that kind of problem worse since you will be even more handsy.
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thanks for the tips. RC, you mentioned the hands and I do think that's a big part of the problem. i feel like my arms turn around my body rather than my body turning and pulling my arms with it.
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low and wide on the backswing. Keep the clubhead along the target line as long as you can.
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I've had the same problem pull or hook with my driver and pull with my irons. I've tried opening the club face and weaker grips without consistent success (except on the range, of course lol). Today I lead the downswing with my lead arm through the ball and forgot about my trail arm. It worked today. I only played 9 holes due to the heat in Dallas, but I shot 2 over par, which is really good for me.

I think I was being too dominant with my right arm. Pefection would be to be equal with both arms, but this is working for now.

Take some practice swings first with the lead arm only (one arm).
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a pull would be cause from outside in swing, not inside out... just sayin.
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appreciate the help guys. i got something working today on the course and hit 4 or 5 of the best drives i've ever hit. i stepped up to the ball with the same mentality as i would have a long iron. kept my hands out in front of the shaft and focused on finishing with a high follow through. it seemed to really help.
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I also have a pronounced in to out swing that results in a push draw. (I deliberately open the clubface at address with all clubs, including driver) With the longer clubs (especially driver), I try to extend my legs and spine earlier and more forcefully in the forward swing (downswing). As I approach the top of my backswing, I think, "crush the soda can with my left heel and straighten the legs and spine"--this is almost like jumping forward and up. With the driver, I do this as early, as quick, and as forcefully as I can. If I don't, I risk a pull draw.

see how Ernie Els stomps down and straightens his left leg while extending his spine early in the forward swing. His legs are straight (extended) at impact and his back is significantly extended at impact.

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