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rustyredcab

Seemore Love

10 posts in this topic

Love, love love. It has been a few weeks and I can safely say that I am in love with my new Seemore PCB putter and the Seemore technique, setup, and overall concept.

I used to need to search for my putting stroke on the practice green before every round. Somedays I found the feel, ball position, just the right amount of forward press, hands holding the club square past impact, and speed control that made me a good putter that day. Other days I was still tinkering and searching for a putter stroke on the 18th green. My buddies described my putting as "streaky" -- a polite way of saying I was inconsistent with some good days among the awful days. I'll soon be 55. As I become an old guy, I hope my short game and putting will carry my game.

So, I finally decided that it was time to become a consistently good putter. Research here and on other golf forum led to to look into Seemore for both the putters and the technique that the putters aid. The videos on the Seemore.com website are very informative (even if the production quality is sub-par). I was able to have a good idea what I was getting into if I joined the Seemore family.

It is not really so different than most good putters teach, with a few exceptions. It is all very different for me. The Seemore putters aid in helping you create a nice, small, arc swing to the putter. (I was a guy who tried SBST). A neutral setup position and a shoulder "swing" may be common to most, but were not my old style. I dove in head first. I was using a 33" putter and bought the Seemore PCB at the recommended 35". I changed my stance to be narrower and closer to the ball while standing more upright. I practiced the gentle arc that hides the dot throughout the swing with the arms letting the putter do the work. I did not change to Pat O'Brien's suggested grip and I kept my recently discovered Super Stroke 3.0 on my new Seemore.

Wow what a difference Seemore has made. I not going to tell you that I now drain every putt. But, I know exactly what I'm trying to do when I set up to the ball. I can check my setup by "hiding the dot." I can check by arc by hiding the dot when the putter is back and through. I hit the center of the putter almost every time and I hit the ball straight on my line. And, tomorrow my putting should be the same as it was yesterday and today. No more searching on the practice green before a round.

If the few rounds I've played since switching to Seemore are any indication, I will soon be a consistently good putter soon. Heck, I may be already. For example, in today's round, I made a few nice putts over 5 feet. I played a longer than usual course today so, when I hit the green in regulation, I had longer than usual first putts. I was not pouring in 20 footers all day. But, significantly, I had second putt tap-ins all day with only one exception (an awful read on a 50 foot putt, I read as near straight and it broke eight feet and was not as uphill as I thought, that left me 10 feet and my only 3-putt). And many of those 15-30 foot first putts had a real chance to go in. I got up and down from every green I missed save one and my confidence in my putting was a big part of my chipping being better. I felt if I could get within five feet I could get the putt down. 31 putts for the round. If I keep putting like this I'll drop two points of my index by the 15th.

I started this thread in hopes that others might share their experience with Seemore methods and Seemore putters. And, perhaps those considering Seemore could find help here. Join in the love.

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I used the original FGP before Payne's US Open win, and then went back to the black and platinum mFGP in 2007. Stayed with it for two years and enjoyed it. I keep an original FGP as a training aid. I need more weight in the head and counterweighting. I haven't really gotten along with their other models. The alignment system, RST, does work and it's a great aid I think they are a fine putter company, but the tour models are bit overpriced, and they need to offer more head weight adjustment and counterbalancing
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My index was 9.3 when my Seemore arrived. Less than one month later, it is 7.7 as of this morning's revision. Under 8.0 is a huge deal for me.

Seemore PCB and new Seemore technique are not the only reasons, but they sure made a difference. I'm not a great putter yet. Not even really good yet. But man am I getting more confident and feeling better about being on the green. And that confidence is translating to more GIR. Because almost anywhere on the green is good, I don't pressure myself into going for sucker pins.

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I see they have counter balanced putters with heavy heads and longer than traditional lengths. Those would be interesting, if only retailers carried a sufficient supply of them, but they don't
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Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond

I see they have counter balanced putters with heavy heads and longer than traditional lengths.

Those would be interesting, if only retailers carried a sufficient supply of them, but they don't

It is a shame that most Seemore styles are not available at retail, for testing or purchase. BUT, their customer service is highly rated in other golf forums. And I was encouraged to send my back if I was at all unhappy. It is still a leap of faith to by a putter based on online reviews and comments from a phone call with the factory.

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Taylor, Big Break finalist, rocks a Seemore and has made everything she looked at.

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Seemore wins Big Break. Taylor sinks more than a few key putts. Sure she missed a few, but she won the match in large part because of her putting. And we both play yellow balls!

As the old ad said, "...swing like a girl."

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Actually.... Seemore promote a swing with a small arc... in to out to in... They do not mention a straight back and striaght through technique....

Time to change the old myths and formula!!

I recently purchased a Seemore PCB Limited edition Black putter and I cannot sing it's praises enough! It is without a doubt the best golfing money I have spent for a long time... and I spend a lot of golfing money....

The riflescope technology pretty much guarantees you are going to get the face back square at impact... it is so well balanced, but like the poster above, I assume face balanced putters were for straight back and straight through strokes... I was wrong!

I barely grip the putter at address and during the swing... it is so well balanced that I don't need to... It just naturally comes back square every time... and I mean every time!!

I've had it for 3 weeks now and I haven't missed a put under 6 foot with it yet!! Also, to top it off... where I was holing say, 1 20 footer per round.. I now regularly hole 4-5 20 footers per round.... it has changed my game and knocked 4-5 shots off each round...

The confidence I have when I line up to a putt now is priceless!! They fly into the middle back of the hole...

Just go out and buy one... it will be the best putting improvement move you ever make!

Also, customer services is excellent.... last time I emailed them it was the managing director/owner that answered all my questions...

Peter.

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Purchased a Seemore FGP about four months ago. Love it. A bit light, so I've put lead tape in the cavity. Superstroke 3.0 on it. I've putted with everything ( seemingly ) under the sun. This is by far the most consistent putter I've used. Haven't drained alot of long putts, but inside 10 ft has been automatic. No 3 putts! I'm very happy with it.
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