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golfclubmogul

Making a wedge look like new

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I have a Cleveland reg. 588 tour action wedge, and was looking to take out all the scratches and dings to make it look nice again. It is an old club, so willing to try anything on it. Now I know that many of you are going to say that it is a wedge and it is supposed to be all beaten up or whatever, but I want to make it look good.

Before you make any judgement of my paint fill, it was my first time and I was trying to learn how to do it.

I want to just take all the paint out and start over with it for a fun project.

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By that wear pattern, would it be too much to imply you've hit a shank or two in your life? :-D That weapon has been thru a war. It looks like it may take some effort to clean that baby up.
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Maybe a flat file across the face (lightly) to remove the gouges and nicks... or a random orbital sander with some 100 grit abrasive disc or paper on it?

Then something to sharpen the grooves?

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A Dremel tool with a router cage can just take the top surface of the wedge off. Kind of like the milling process. Chrome is very hard. I have a carbide groove sharpener. Sharpens V grooves. Sounds like a lot of work, but you can't under estimate the value of the satisfaction of doing it yourself. Good luck.
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It actually isn't my club. Someone gave it to me and I use it to experiment on.
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I would caution you about trying to re groove it. Depending on the metal of the wedge, it can be a real pain. I spent an hour on my Eye 2 8-iron (which is admittedly one of the harder clubs out there) and barely left a scratch trying to re groove it.
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Yah, I was planning on just taking the scratches away and making it look decent again.
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I don't have a dremel tool, but could I use a scotch brite pad or steel wool?
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I don't have a dremel tool, but could I use a scotch brite pad or steel wool?

Both of those (and possibly the dremel as well) would give it a "brushed steel" appearance. It wouldn't be super shiny, but you could make it so that instead of big scratches there were instead lots and lots of tiny little scratches going the same direction. Look up brushed steel pictures if you want to see what I mean.

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Steel wool or a Scotch Brite will only polish it. You need something that will remove some metal to get those scratches out. If that is a forged head, a carbide regrooving tool should do the trick. I can't find mine or I'd try it.
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If I was to use one of the above, which would you prefer? Steel wool, scotchbrite pad, or sandpaper (if so, what grit). I like the brushed look and it would take away the scratches pretty well.

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If I was to use one of the above, which would you prefer? Steel wool, scotchbrite pad, or sandpaper (if so, what grit). I like the brushed look and it would take away the scratches pretty well.

Sandpaper for sure. Start with some heavy grit paper and work your way down to the finer stuff. Start with some 30-40 grit paper to get the big dings sanded down, then move to 80 grit, then 200, and further if you desire a better finish.

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Sandpaper for sure. Start with some heavy grit paper and work your way down to the finer stuff. Start with some 30-40 grit paper to get the big dings sanded down, then move to 80 grit, then 200, and further if you desire a better finish.

This sounds good. I'm a wood worker, but the concept holds.

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On metal, you want to use Emery Cloth, not sand paper. Also, use some sort of sanding block to keep things flat, for the face anyway.

Any home depot, ect will have it in varying grits.

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That's character.....................don't do a thing except to keep the grooves clean.

If you want a wedge to look new, replace it every year. Sanding a wedge? REaaaaaly?   Hahaha.... :doh:

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