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Hogan...mythical?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

I was at "the dome" a couple weeks ago and i over heard a middle age man noticing an older gentlemens irons. and they they were both "hogans". They talked about how each other were the only ones they knew playing these irons. almost sounded like they were a rare to hit club. But i see them all over ebay as if nobody likes them. is there a special "gem-like" quality to hogans that makes them so uncommon out on the course?

 

what is so alluring about hogan irons? and...

what are some of the best ones that were made?

post #2 of 32

They were probably referring to the irons made when Ben Hogan was still in charge of his company, before it was sold.  From what I have read, he personally oversaw production, and in its day they were some of the best irons made. Quality control was second to none.

 

post #3 of 32

I got a chance to hit a Hogan Apex Edge 5-iron at the range not too long ago and it felt amazing. The shaft was strange but it seemed to compliment the clubhead. It had that "buttery" feel that everyone seems to like.

post #4 of 32

I just bought a set of Apex Plus irons this morning.  They looked practically brand new, and they were only $79+tax.  So far, I've only hit them off a mat in the store --- I can't wait to try them out on the course. c3_clap.gif

 

I also play Hogan BH-5s.  They're game-improvement (at least, I think that's the right category for them), and I like them quite a bit --- though I think they are a bit less forgiving than some other clubs I hit.

 

When I got into golf (almost exactly two years ago), my father-in-law said to read "5 Lessons", and my uncle (a scratch player before breaking his back) said he liked Hogan stuff.  So, I decided to put together a completely Hogan bag since, as the OP points out, you can find the stuff fairly cheap online.

 

My take on the cheapness is:

1) Since the company isn't really around anymore, they don't have anything 'new' and everyone seems to want the 'new' stuff.  The market dictates that 'old' stuff is devalued --- cheap.

2) It's been several years (since 2007?) since people could buy it 'new', and they've been trading in the clubs for the next set, so the market is getting a lot of Hogan stuff. And traded-in clubs usually go for cheap.

 

All the reviews I can find seem very complimentary of the Hogan clubs --- even the older reviews from when the company was around.

 

 

post #5 of 32

The Hogan Apex was their top of the line iron back in the day.  The Edge was their entry into the world of GI clubs.  It was a forged cavity back design, very much like the MacGregor JNP's that came out about the same time.  The Apex was a pure blade and they were as beautiful as a club could be.

post #6 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrayCat View Post

The Hogan Apex was their top of the line iron back in the day.  The Edge was their entry into the world of GI clubs.  It was a forged cavity back design, very much like the MacGregor JNP's that came out about the same time.  The Apex was a pure blade and they were as beautiful as a club could be.



Damn those JNPs look nice. I forgot about those.   http://www.clubsofdistinction.com/cod/ucir3559.txt

 

The Edge irons were HUUUUGE for Hogan. They even had trouble keeping up with orders.

post #7 of 32

According to a Wikipedia entry, Ben Hogan started his own golf clubs company in 1953 in Ft. Worth, Texas. In 1960 Hogan sold the company to AMF (bowling systems, among other things). In 1985, AMF sold it, and the Hogan Company was sold twice more before Spalding Topflite bought it in 1997.

 

Then, Callaway bought {Spalding Topflite + Hogan} at a bankruptcy sale in 2004. In 2008, Callaway discontinued the Hogan line. (end Wikip)

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

Hogan made some popular irons, such as the Apex, Edge and Bounce Sole. Most, however, were in the Conventional category for Maltby Playability Factor (somewhat hard to hit).

 

The Hogan Sure-Out sand wedge was popular for decades.

 

Under Callaway, a hint of the Hogan heritage has emerged in the Diablo Edge irons.

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 32

I'm assuming this is all taken directly from a Callaway brochure. There's no way "a hint of the Hogan heritage" has emerged with this fugly assed bunch-o-crap.

 

 

 

2010420112335749.jpg

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

According to a Wikipedia entry, Ben Hogan started his own golf clubs company in 1953 in Ft. Worth, Texas. In 1960 Hogan sold the company to AMF (bowling systems, among other things). In 1985, AMF sold it, and the Hogan Company was sold twice more before Spalding Topflite bought it in 1997.

 

Then, Callaway bought {Spalding Topflite + Hogan} at a bankruptcy sale in 2004. In 2008, Callaway discontinued the Hogan line. (end Wikip)

____________________________________________________________________________________

 

Hogan made some popular irons, such as the Apex, Edge and Bounce Sole. Most, however, were in the Conventional category for Maltby Playability Factor (somewhat hard to hit).

 

The Hogan Sure-Out sand wedge was popular for decades.

 

Under Callaway, a hint of the Hogan heritage has emerged in the Diablo Edge irons.

 

 

 

 



 

post #9 of 32
Thread Starter 

im considering getting them as a second or third set to manage the wear of my new fg tour irons. i just didnt understand why there were so many sets up online if they were high quality clubs much like nicklaus golf irons? and any ideas on channelbacks? which im also considering nicklaus' newer players forged called the nps-2. Check em out they are a solid looking set.

 

 

 

http://nicklausgolf.com/np/NPS-2-irons.php

post #10 of 32

The Apex plus iron was used to help design the Callaway Proto X iron(now called Razr X Muscleback) This is the iron Phil and most of Callaway touring professionals use. The Apex Plus is a tremendous iron and can be purchased off ebay at a resonable price. Remember that in Apex shaft -3 is Reg and 4 is stiff.

post #11 of 32

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_millerView Post


Damn those JNPs look nice. I forgot about those.   http://www.clubsofdistinction.com/cod/ucir3559.txt

 

I loved mine.  Played them from 1990-91 up until 2008.  I also have the 1 iron thru PW, MacGregor Velocitized 300-S shafts.  Great clubs.  I'm sure the Hogan Edge from that era are every bit as good.

post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

I'm assuming this is all taken directly from a Callaway brochure. There's no way "a hint of the Hogan heritage" has emerged with this fugly assed bunch-o-crap.

 

 

2010420112335749.jpg
 

What?? You don't see the similarity? Poor Ben is probably rolling over, seeing the name "Edge" associated with those Callaways.z7_no.gif

 

edge_forged_gs_large.jpg
 

 

post #13 of 32

Those Diablo irons are hideous!!

 

There is nothing myth-like about hogan irons. I bought a set of Apex Plus irons in the off season for a fraction of what a new set would cost and have played my best golf of my career with them.

 

I have been asked what kind of irons I'm hitting a few times this year and even had a 16 yo kid ask me if my initials were BH. LMAO

post #14 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlf16507 View Post

The Apex plus iron was used to help design the Callaway Proto X iron(now called Razr X Muscleback) This is the iron Phil and most of Callaway touring professionals use. The Apex Plus is a tremendous iron and can be purchased off ebay at a resonable price. Remember that in Apex shaft -3 is Reg and 4 is stiff.



1994 Apex

0105_2_lg.jpg

Not sure - but definitely after Callaway purchased the brand.

 

better_hogan_600x600.jpg

 

 

The X-prototype - an obvious homage to the 1994 Channelback . . .

 

!!d-0H8gBGM~$(KGrHqR,!ioEzNsiHq5cBM7E5vy7sw~~_32.JPG?set_id=89040003C1

 

 

post #15 of 32

Here's a player's club.  Hogan Apex, circa 1973:

 

apex_large.jpg

post #16 of 32

After first reading this tread I found a couple of used sets at the local super store. (Cheap!)

 

Anyway, they didn't feel anymore special hitting indoor practice rocks then Wilsons and MacGregors from the era.

 

I did find a Bettinardi Ben Hogan model putter in the used putter pile. (cheap!)  It's heavy, soft and buttery. (I bought it.)  I wonder if it just has Hogans name on it, or if he had anything to do with it?

post #17 of 32

Sean,

 

"...a hint of Hogan heritage" is my words. My info came from Wikipedia (was able to verify the story line from bits here and there) and the list of Hogan iron models, with assessments, from the Ralph Maltby MPF book.

 

What Callaway did was purchase two competitors, use the TopFlite as its cost leader line, and discontinue Hogan line. Hogan was more of a threat to Callaway brand market segment than TopFlite.

 

Callaway did borrow the Edge name from the Hogan line, but they own the rights.

 

Golf clubs mfg is no different than any other industry. After a period of growth when everybody wants to make golf clubs, you reach industry overcapacity, supply outstrips demand, and get a "shakeout" of the weaker firms of the industry. Sometimes the financially struggling firms get bought out by the eventual survivors, and either get integrated into the survivor's operation or get shut down. Or, they disappear like Nickent.

 

MacGregor got bought by Golfsmith - a retailer not a manufacturer. Golfsmith revived the line after 18 months of reorientation.

post #18 of 32

I followed the Ben Hogan brand's disappearance, reappearance, disappearance, etc. when it happened. I was a fan of the brand in the 80s.

 

If you're suggesting Callaway's use of the previously used "Edge" (the original forged cavity back player's iron) is a hint of their heritage because it reminds people they own the brand, then I see your point. What I was suggesting was, reminding people these SGI abominations share the name of a great line of irons is a twisting of the knife for diehard fans of classic forged Ben Hogan irons. I like Callaway woods, Odyssey putters, newer Top Flite balls, and of course they make great wedges (thanks in part to Roger Cleveland), but when it comes to these particular irons, Callaway can suck it!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

Sean,

 

"...a hint of Hogan heritage" is my words. My info came from Wikipedia (was able to verify the story line from bits here and there) and the list of Hogan iron models, with assessments, from the Ralph Maltby MPF book.

 

What Callaway did was purchase two competitors, use the TopFlite as its cost leader line, and discontinue Hogan line. Hogan was more of a threat to Callaway brand market segment than TopFlite.

 

Callaway did borrow the Edge name from the Hogan line, but they own the rights.

 

Golf clubs mfg is no different than any other industry. After a period of growth when everybody wants to make golf clubs, you reach industry overcapacity, supply outstrips demand, and get a "shakeout" of the weaker firms of the industry. Sometimes the financially struggling firms get bought out by the eventual survivors, and either get integrated into the survivor's operation or get shut down. Or, they disappear like Nickent.

 

MacGregor got bought by Golfsmith - a retailer not a manufacturer. Golfsmith revived the line after 18 months of reorientation.



 

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