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Putters: Heavy or Light?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

I have been playing with an Odyssey 2 ball Blade with the adjustable weights that can change the putter head weight from 350-360-370 grams.  I have heard that heavier is better for faster greens as it slows your stroke down and that's lighter is better for slower greens as it allows for a longer, quicker stroke.  What is your experience and preference? I plan to experiment in the next few rounds so I will report back.  I currently use the 360 setting but I am thinking of going heavier to 370.  

post #2 of 28

my scotty has 20g weights in it instead of the standard 10g weights. my putting stroke with lighter putters i've found to be much more inconsistent.

post #3 of 28

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gioguy21 View Post

my scotty has 20g weights in it instead of the standard 10g weights. my putting stroke with lighter putters i've found to be much more inconsistent.


10g is only standard in 35" putters. 20g is standard in 33" putters. 15g standard in 34" putters.

 

33" - 350g head weight

34" - 340g head weight

35" - 330g head weight

 

FWIW, virtually everyone we've fit ends up with a heavier putter. Mine's 370 grams, 33", and has 60g counterweight as well. Dave's is 384g with no counterweight (I could make mine 384 as well - we have the interchangeable weights).

post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 


10g is only standard in 35" putters. 20g is standard in 33" putters. 15g standard in 34" putters.

 

33" - 350g head weight

34" - 340g head weight

35" - 330g head weight

 

FWIW, virtually everyone we've fit ends up with a heavier putter. Mine's 370 grams, 33", and has 60g counterweight as well. Dave's is 384g with no counterweight (I could make mine 384 as well - we have the interchangeable weights).


My apologies, i didn't mention i have a 35 incher. I feel that being so tall, a lighter putter (Nike Method 001 for example) is just not enough to a) keep a steady stroke going back and b) doesn't get the touch on shorter putts that're needed for my 'feel'
 

 

 

post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 


10g is only standard in 35" putters. 20g is standard in 33" putters. 15g standard in 34" putters.

 

33" - 350g head weight

34" - 340g head weight

35" - 330g head weight

 

FWIW, virtually everyone we've fit ends up with a heavier putter. Mine's 370 grams, 33", and has 60g counterweight as well. Dave's is 384g with no counterweight (I could make mine 384 as well - we have the interchangeable weights).



Why do you think so many people end up heavier as a result of your fitting? This is more what I was looking for.  Thanks.

 

post #6 of 28

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TourSpoon View Post

Why do you think so many people end up heavier as a result of your fitting? This is more what I was looking for.  Thanks.


Why? Because green speeds are faster than they used to be. I think the average putter is still way too light. Most players are better at controlling their speed with heavier putters.

post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 


Why? Because green speeds are faster than they used to be. I think the average putter is still way too light. Most players are better at controlling their speed with heavier putters.


I follow the logic and it is why I brought this up. I am thinking about going to 370 and seeing if that improves the distance control.  At first I was under the impression that a lighter putter is better for fast greens and a heavy putter for slow greens. But the more I think about it the reverse is true. It is not about the stroke being the same and the weight being the factor, it is the weight influencing the speed and length of your swing given your natural tempo. Hence, a heavier putter will slow and shorten your stroke with the tempo being similar and produces a more desirable outcome on faster greens for many players. 

 

Are there any other Sand Trappers that have any experience with this?  Don't be shy, I know that 100% of you have putters!  f1_cool.gif

 

post #8 of 28

I like soft iron on the heavy side (not to heavy) for all conditions,  for feel a I call Live Dead

 

Pings Answer's are too light and Live Live.  (Harder to control distance)

 

Heavy Putter (the brand) - too heavy and Dead Dead. (No feel at all)

 

An adjustable club would drive me nuts.  I also don't care for soft inserts on a hard casting.

 

I set up two Bullseyes. One with a steel shaft the other with graphite. No significant difference in feel.

 

I had two Wilson Tours. One forged, the other not. No significant difference in feel. They feel different but not enough to matter.


Edited by The Tin Man - 12/19/11 at 7:47pm
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 

So I set my putter to the 370 gram setting and practiced with it twice. Took it out today and only needed 28 putts. More amazing is that there were no 3 putts. I think I have a new philosophy!  

post #10 of 28

I prefer a heavy biased putter compared to lighter . it calms my hands on the green . I also like it from just off the green where a lighter putter may grab and stick in grass a heavy one slides through

post #11 of 28

Heavier because it has a higher MOI, so its more forgiving on offcenter hits and because with a heavier head you will have a smoother stroke.

post #12 of 28

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TitleistWI View Post

Heavier because it has a higher MOI, so its more forgiving on offcenter hits and because with a heavier head you will have a smoother stroke.


Well, the first is irrelevant if you don't mishit putts very often, and the second isn't necessarily true.

 

I've said before and I'll say again that as much as I love the Edel fitting system for getting people to AIM properly, the best thing it offers is the ability to customize head weight, counter-weight, and mid-shaft weight for distance control.

 

In my experience it has little to do with the "smoothness" of the stroke. We've fit golfers with the smoothest strokes you'd ever want who couldn't stop three balls within four feet of each other from 15 feet with some weight systems. Change the weight and they can hit three balls to within a ball's diameter of each other.

 

And if you're mishitting short putts, your aim is likely causing a compensation in your stroke or your setup in general needs something.

 

post #13 of 28

I think it depends on you - I've noticed a lot of pros going to he huge heavier MOI type heads - I assume it helps quiet their hands when they're playing for millions of $$$.

 

Some guys have quiet hands and only use their bigger muscles -- they're gifted. Most of us are not... I have a variable weight Anser type blade at 35 inches. I've gone lighter and heavier weight depending on how the putter feels to me that day and my disposition.

 

As the putter gets shorter, typically a golfer will want a heavier weight so they can feel the weight of the head help quiet their hands. Some use a counterweight to assist with that issue, too. Feeling heft in the hands also helps, but there is no formula. It's about you.

post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 


10g is only standard in 35" putters. 20g is standard in 33" putters. 15g standard in 34" putters.

 

33" - 350g head weight

34" - 340g head weight

35" - 330g head weight

 

FWIW, virtually everyone we've fit ends up with a heavier putter. Mine's 370 grams, 33", and has 60g counterweight as well. Dave's is 384g with no counterweight (I could make mine 384 as well - we have the interchangeable weights).

Hi Erik, this past Summer during the Aimpoint clinic you recommended that I add more weight to my 34" Ghost Spider Putter which I was using with the standard 360g head and a Winn Jumbo pistol grip.  

 

The Ghost Spider putter comes standard with 2x 4g removable weights.  So this weekend, I was practicing putting and noticed my stroke wasn't as smooth as I'd like it to be.  So I started thinking back to the conversation with you about needing to investigate adding weight to the putter.  And I have extra weight kits in my garage from previous TaylorMade products I've purchased, and switched out the 2x 4g plugs  with 2x 10g plugs.  So taking the head from the stock 360g to 372g.  

 

I soon realized that the 372g head felt much better, and it helped smooth out my putting stroke.  Now I've been working on my stroke all week using my putting alley training aid.  And I'm pleased with the change.  But the question I have now is about placing a counterweight in the grip.

 

1.) What does the counterweight in the grip do for ones putting stroke?

2.) Why did you go with a 60g versus a 30g or 15g??  Just curious as I'm liking the idea of adding more weight, but not sure how much I should add.

3.) Where can I get 60g counterweights?  I found anywhere from 8 to 24g counterweights for a steel shaft online. But not anything near 60g.

4.) When installing the counterweight - do I need to use any tape or adhesive to secure it into the shaft?  Or does the installation of the grip - sliding down over the counterweight - hold it in place?

 

And I know I could've sent this via PM, but I figured others may learn something from these questions?  Or be interested in hearing my confidence boost I gained in simply adding 12g to the head of my putter. f1_cool.gif

 

Thanks!

Beach

post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachcomber View Post

1.) What does the counterweight in the grip do for ones putting stroke?

2.) Why did you go with a 60g versus a 30g or 15g??  Just curious as I'm liking the idea of adding more weight, but not sure how much I should add.

3.) Where can I get 60g counterweights?  I found anywhere from 8 to 24g counterweights for a steel shaft online. But not anything near 60g.

4.) When installing the counterweight - do I need to use any tape or adhesive to secure it into the shaft?  Or does the installation of the grip - sliding down over the counterweight - hold it in place?

 

And I know I could've sent this via PM, but I figured others may learn something from these questions?  Or be interested in hearing my confidence boost I gained in simply adding 12g to the head of my putter. f1_cool.gif

 

You know how TGM fans say the golf swing is all about managing PRESSURE?

 

That's the answer to #1 as well. Your hands will sense different levels of pressure with the grip counter-weighted versus not. There's no one formula except I can tell you that everyone we've fit for putters does better with pretty heavy heads (370 and up) and 60% of the people we fit do better with some counter-weights as well.

 

2. Because I tested myself and 60 was when I performed best - I stopped the ball on a string better and my stroke was visibly better at 60. I could have gone to 90 but 60 was a bit better. 40 was worse than 90. 115 was worse than 40. 20 was worse than 115.

 

3. Just get a shop to do it. They can probably glue some weights together or something.

 

4. The counter-weight should go in the shaft. I imagine you might take the grip off, glue the counter-weight in place, and re-install the grip.

 

You should consider getting fit for an Edel at some point, even if you don't buy that day.

post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

You know how TGM fans say the golf swing is all about managing PRESSURE?

 

That's the answer to #1 as well. Your hands will sense different levels of pressure with the grip counter-weighted versus not. There's no one formula except I can tell you that everyone we've fit for putters does better with pretty heavy heads (370 and up) and 60% of the people we fit do better with some counter-weights as well.

 

2. Because I tested myself and 60 was when I performed best - I stopped the ball on a string better and my stroke was visibly better at 60. I could have gone to 90 but 60 was a bit better. 40 was worse than 90. 115 was worse than 40. 20 was worse than 115.

 

3. Just get a shop to do it. They can probably glue some weights together or something.

 

4. The counter-weight should go in the shaft. I imagine you might take the grip off, glue the counter-weight in place, and re-install the grip.

 

You should consider getting fit for an Edel at some point, even if you don't buy that day.

Thanks for the quick response... Doing some poking around... I found that Tom Wishon fitters have 60/80/100g counterweights for putters.  And they sell kits with a tool that you can remove the counterweights from the grip.  From what I could tell - they bore out a hole in the butt end of the grip, and then provide a tool for the golfer to add/remove the weights.  I'm going to set a visit up with a fitter here in Socal and see what they can do to incorporate this feature into my current putter.  

 

post #17 of 28

Oh, and I like the reference to the TGM and Pressure.  

 

Practicing a lot of putting here at the house, and I notice that if I have solid pressure points in my thumbs (left and right) on the pistol putter grip - then my quality of stroke and percentage of making the putt goes up significantly.  

 

So adding that counterweight should help increase that feel/pressure points in the thumbs for sure.

post #18 of 28

Golfworks has counterweights as well:  

I have my putter backweighted as well, and love it.  After testing with different weights, I put an 80g backweight in my putter.   

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