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05tacoma

Need wedge advice

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05tacoma    0

After a 20 year hiatus from the game I've really started to get back into it, playing as much as my schedule will allow.  I want to get a set of wedges and need some advice.  I see some cheap wedges at the big box sporting goods stores from $30 to $50 each.  Then there are the higher end wedges that start around $80 on sale (Cleveland, Callaway, etc.).  I've also seen a 3 wedge set from Adams at around $100 and finally plenty of used wedges at Callaway pre-owned.

I've purchased some fairway woods and a driver from Callaway pre-owned and was quite impressed (in fact, they looked like they were barely used).  But should wedges be bought new?  Is their a big difference between the big box cheapy wedges and the higher end ones I mentioned?  Or could I go Callaway-preowned?  I can get a 52, 56, and 60 in average condition for about $150 -

X Series JAWS CC Slate Wedges

thoughts?

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Originally Posted by 05tacoma

After a 20 year hiatus from the game I've really started to get back into it, playing as much as my schedule will allow.  I want to get a set of wedges and need some advice.  I see some cheap wedges at the big box sporting goods stores from $30 to $50 each.  Then there are the higher end wedges that start around $80 on sale (Cleveland, Callaway, etc.).  I've also seen a 3 wedge set from Adams at around $100 and finally plenty of used wedges at Callaway pre-owned.

I've purchased some fairway woods and a driver from Callaway pre-owned and was quite impressed (in fact, they looked like they were barely used).  But should wedges be bought new?  Is their a big difference between the big box cheapy wedges and the higher end ones I mentioned?  Or could I go Callaway-preowned?  I can get a 52, 56, and 60 in average condition for about $150 -

X Series JAWS CC Slate Wedges

thoughts?

Frankly, it's impossible to tell without more information. We have no idea what your skill level is, what your playing style is, or what your means are for purchasing clubs. Sure there's a difference between premium wedges and $40 wedges. Otherwise, pros would be playing them. But the real question is: will a more expensive wedge really improve your game, and is it worth the extra money?

Again, hard to answer that question without a little more info.

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05tacoma    0

Maybe this would help.  I'll classify myself as a beginner and have slow swing speed. Quite honestly I have zero idea what my playing style is except that I want to improve my short game.  I can buy premium wedges if I want but have been impressed with the quality of Callaway pre-owned stuff as well.  All I know is the cheap lob wedge I'm using works, but it just feels "dead."

With that info... do you think I'd notice a marked difference between some used Callaway premium wedges and new wedges?  Thanks...

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inthehole    126

wedges are the one club that I will only buy new.    Fresh grooves are important & as for me, I just don't want to play someones elses wedge that has rock chips and such ... wedges get beat up more than any other club

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Hardballs    41
Yeah, I'll be surprised if you can buy second hand wedges in good condition, they sure do get beat up fast! I've only had my Clevelands a couple of months and they looked well used, I don't mind, but think I'd struggle to sell them! Personally I bought new, but I didn't get the latest and greatest, I got the cleveland cg15's, they're about 3 series old, but were top of the range at the time, so I got them at less than half price, and they work a treat!

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WUTiger    452

inthehole and Hardballs have the same concerns I do about buying used wedges. How beat up will they be?

As for the Adams Tom Watson three-pack, these are good value but not cheap . This combo has been around for several years with just minor tweaks, so Adams doesn't have to recover a lot of R&D; $$ in its sales price.

These wedges come in a 52.08, 56.12 and 60.08 mix, basically medium bounce. If you are a basic wedge player - avoid fancy shots - these might work quite well.

I've bought a couple of used wedges, either demos or one that got traded in after a couple of rounds.

Since you are coming back strong, you might want to get fitted for some wedges. You could wear out used wedges really quick. The Cleveland CG.14, 15 and 16 models are still plentiful, and as you noted, you could get a three-wedge mix for $80 each or less.

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PirateJim    28

I really know nothing about the Adams wedge set, but it sounds like a pretty good option for starters.  Adams makes good quality clubs in general I believe.  Maybe you'll love them and keep 'em for a long time.  Maybe you'll get some very worthwhile experience while using them and be able to make a better determination of your needs in six months or so and won't be out of pocket for as much as you would be with new higher end wedges.  Wedges are real personal, and nobody here can really tell you what the right set mix for you will be.

I too am not so sure about buying used wedges, particularly off the internet, sight unseen.  The Golfsmith store I wander into from time to time has a good size used club rack and I always find myself poking  through them.  Invariably the wedges, as a group, are by far the most beat up of the bunch.  They are the clubs people grab to extract themselves from the nastiest situations they don't just take an unplayable from.  They are the ones you discover the big rock just under the sand with most often.  And, they are both more often used than most of your other irons, but also shorter, so when you drop them back into the bag they bonk into the other nearby clubs on the way in, usually off the face...

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I have the adams wedge set. It is indeed an excellent set of wedges. I hit all the necessary shots with the 56 and 60 around the greens. The 52 is a good 90-100yd gap wedge for me. I sold a taylormade rac 60 a while back and honestly prefer the adams 60. For value clubs they are excellent and will serve you well for a long time. My only complaint was the grip. They are a little cheesy so I swapped mine for lamkin crossline

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