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"101 Mistakes All Golfers Make" by Jon Sherman

Note: This thread is 1491 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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Discuss "101 Mistakes All Golfers Make" by Jon Sherman here.

You can also tag @jd1623 as he is the author of the book. I got a paperback copy a few days ago and will share my (honest) thoughts on the book here shortly.

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Thanks for starting this thread Erik. I'm the author of the book so I thought I would briefly chime in here.

I tried to write a book that I wish someone had handed to me when I was first starting to take golf seriously over 20 years ago. My goal was to create an informal guide to the game that would point players in the right direction on course strategy, how to practice effectively, the mental game, and a few other topics. I tried to keep everything as easy to understand as possible, and I believe that beginners through intermediate golfers stand to gain the most from reading it. I don't necessarily expect a more advanced player to learn anything new, but it might remind them of a few things they forgot along the way.

It's only been out for a few days, and I doubt anyone here has had the chance to read it yet, but I'd be happy to answer any questions. 

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Welcome to the site Jon, and good luck with the book!

Are the 101 items strictly from your own personal perspective/experience, or did you include additional research and insight from other people/sources too?

 

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29 minutes ago, David in FL said:

Welcome to the site Jon, and good luck with the book!

Are the 101 items strictly from your own personal perspective/experience, or did you include additional research and insight from other people/sources too?

 

Thanks David!

The 101 items are a collection of mistakes I have made, witnessed, and figured out through research over the years. I've been a student of the game for a very long time, and my approach to golf has been shaped by my own trials and tribulations and what I have learned from some of the better golfing minds. The book is firmly in my own voice, but I do make reference to certain products, books, or instructors that I might have learned something from.

The book is not heavy on technical information, and I tried to make everything as easy to understand as possible. It's more coaching than it is instructional.

 

 

Edited by jd1623
wrong word use

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@jd1623, have you reviewed the published quality of the Kindle version of your book?

I ask as I've often been disappointing with Kindle versions in that they sometimes are missing content and sometimes have diagrams/pictures that are so small that they are impossible to read.  I've become reluctant to buy certain types of books on Kindle.  I think it's a good idea for the author to do some quality control regarding Kindle versions.

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8 hours ago, No Mulligans said:

@jd1623, have you reviewed the published quality of the Kindle version of your book?

I've started reading it on Kindle and it seems ok so far (up to about number 40).  It appears to be mostly text based so less potential issues with formatting.  There are a couple of hanging titles but I'll post back if I see anything major.

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2 hours ago, ZappyAd said:

I've started reading it on Kindle and it seems ok so far (up to about number 40).  It appears to be mostly text based so less potential issues with formatting.  There are a couple of hanging titles but I'll post back if I see anything major.

Hope you're enjoying!

So the book was initially formatted for a 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 trade paperback. I did convert to Kindle, and double checked everything on my own. However, since there are essentially 101 mini chapters all with their own heading it's impossible to make sure they fit in properly because Kindle users can change the size of the text (which is why you will see a few hanging titles). You can see a sample of about 10% of the book on Amazon with their look inside feature.

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Note: This thread is 1491 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

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