Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
reeeeeeegan

Sand wedges and shaft flexes

10 posts in this topic

Okay, something I have been struggling with is hitting shots out of the bunker.  (I think) a lot of people have problems with it, but mine is especially horrid, trust me.  During my last lesson, my golf teacher let me use his sand wedge, and of course, I hit the ball right onto the green, first try.  Then he threw another ball into the bunker, and what did I do?  Same thing.  Night and day, honestly.  We quickly came to the conclusion that I needed to get a new sand wedge, pronto.

My boyfriend gave me a 58 degree wedge a while ago, just because he never used it and thought I could use it to replace my horrendous sand wedge.  However, my golf teacher told me that I shouldn't use it, because it was too long, and that I should definitely not use it until I got it cut down.  Here's question one: how much would it hurt me to use a club (sand wedge in particular) that is too long for me, if I just choke up on it?  Or do I need to go buy a lady's sand wedge?  (question 2 ties into this as well)  Money's tight for this college kid, so if I can avoid buying a new sand wedge, I would.

Topic number two: Female vs male flexes.  I went into a golf store the other day and tested out some drivers, just for fun.  I was doing alright with the women's drivers, and then the guy working there decided I should try out a men's driver because of my club head speed (no, I don't know what that number was, unfortunately.)  So much better.  When I do decide to buy a driver, I will definitely be getting a men's regular flex.  Question two is, when I look into buying other types of clubs, should I look in the men's and just get them cut down?  Or is it just the driver that I would need a men's in?  Men's vs women's clubs in general?  Opinions are greatly appreciated!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

Sounds you need to be fit for your clubs.  One thing to remember is that if you take a shaft and cut it down, you make it stiffer; so if you like a men's regular, perhaps you should just take a ladies' flex and get it cut down, which would put it pretty close to a men's regular.

As for mens' vs womens' sets, its really all personal preference.  IMO, most womens' sets are little more than beginners' sets and arent something you want to use once you get serious about golf but to each their own.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer

Sounds you need to be fit for your clubs.

As for mens' vs womens' sets, its really all personal preference.  IMO, most womens' sets are little more than beginners' sets and arent something you want to use once you get serious about golf but to each their own.

Get fit for clubs? Definitely.

But, I disagree with Gaijin's words which I put into blue. About 2005, Callaway and Adams led the way as the world's golf club manufacturers "went back to the drawing board" to design golf clubs especially for women players.

As for R-flex club shafts, some women can benefit from them. Women who are taller, and/or have a background as softball or tennis players, may generate enough clubhead speed they can use the slightly firmer shafts R-flex shafts for control.

But, you don't know for sure until you get fitted. Since you are a beginner, a simple static fitting would be best. This type of fitting takes into account clubhead speed to estimate shaft flex, and checks shaft length and lie angle, and grip thickness.

Beginners don't benefit from more complicated fittings. As a beginner, your swing changes a lot from day to day until it falls into a groove during your first season or two. The static fittings gets you started - ideally - with clubs that won't hurt your game .

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by WUTiger

But, I disagree with Gaijin's words which I put into blue. About 2005, Callaway and Adams led the way as the world's golf club manufacturers "went back to the drawing board" to design golf clubs especially for women players.

I stand by my original statement.  Ive never seen many womens' sets that I was all that impressed with, other than maybe the Adam's Finesse.

IMO, most of the womens' sets out there are nothing more than mens' starter sets which they paint pink or some other kind of pastel color, put L-flex shafts on them and call it a day.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to remember is that if you take a shaft and cut it down, you make it stiffer; so if you like a men's regular, perhaps you should just take a ladies' flex and get it cut down, which would put it pretty close to a men's regular.

My understanding is that cutting from the tip changes stiffness, whereas from the grip end of the shaft only affects the length. Am I wrong on this?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by Shindig

My understanding is that cutting from the tip changes stiffness, whereas from the grip end of the shaft only affects the length. Am I wrong on this?


Ive never heard that.  My clubbuilder has always cut my shafts at the grip end though.  That might be a question better answered by someone who knows more about clubbuilding than I do.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the shaft and its design
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer

... IMO, most of the womens' sets out there are nothing more than mens' starter sets which they paint pink or some other kind of pastel color, put L-flex shafts on them and call it a day.

Read this WSJ article about Callaway's research and product development on women's clubs. Other companies have since joined in.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121372702050581575.html

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

More than likely, your issue with the 58* wedge isn't the length, nor the shaft. It's the bounce.m most 58* wedges have very little bounce and will tend to dig into the sand for you. You'd be much better served with a high bounce sand wedge. 56* or so and at least 14* of bounce. Get clubs that fit you for length and flex, but when it comes to your sand wedge, make sure you have a lot of bounce....
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Originally Posted by WUTiger

As for R-flex club shafts, some women can benefit from them. Women who are taller, and/or have a background as softball or tennis players, may generate enough clubhead speed they can use the slightly firmer shafts R-flex shafts for control.

...

As a beginner, your swing changes a lot from day to day until it falls into a groove during your first season or two.

I went into a golf shop to hit some drivers and to just see where my swing was at, and he said based on my club head speed I would benefit from a men's regular flex.  I'm wondering if this would apply to all of my clubs or just a driver or what.  Still waiting to get into my "groove", and will not be looking into a new set of clubs for some time, but I'm definitely curious as to what I should be looking for.

Originally Posted by David in FL

More than likely, your issue with the 58* wedge isn't the length, nor the shaft. It's the bounce.m most 58* wedges have very little bounce and will tend to dig into the sand for you. You'd be much better served with a high bounce sand wedge. 56* or so and at least 14* of bounce. Get clubs that fit you for length and flex, but when it comes to your sand wedge, make sure you have a lot of bounce....

I just got my boyfriend's 56 that he doesn't use cut down to my size on Friday... hit a shot into the bunker with it the same day, and wow, it was like butter.  No problem at all.  Might have just got lucky, but still.  Night and day, for sure.  Thanks!

Originally Posted by WUTiger

Read this WSJ article about Callaway's research and product development on women's clubs. Other companies have since joined in.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121372702050581575.html

Interesting article... I'm definitely not ready to go and buy a new set of clubs, and probably won't be for at least a few years.  But that's really cool stuff.

Thank you for the input, everyone.  I would love to get some more info on what cutting the shaft down does to the flex.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Lowest Score Wins
  • Popular Now

  • Posts

    • Travel Bag that fits in a typical Uber trunk
      I have one of these that I inherited from my dad. I think I am missing the pin. Sadly I don't think they make it anymore but one was sold on ebay for 61 clams. It may work for you if you can locate it.  
    • Reading Greens
      Putting skill is based on three things. Reading greens, hitting your target line, and distance control. Missing one out of the three can bleed into the other two and cause you to be a poor putter. I would say green reading isn't going to hurt you as much as having poor distance control or very inconsistent start lines.  My Edel putter influenced my putting more because I lost a ton of strokes three putting. That wasn't misreading greens for me.   
    • Golf backswing tips
      Here is another youtube video that is very simple and straight forward that I really like..concentrating on getting to the first position really helps me keep centered too....just short and simple    
    • Reading Greens
      So your prior experience didn't matter in getting the most out of it. That's good to know. Generally putting skills do also track with HCP (assuming a fairly balanced game) for the average population at each HCP. I think AimPoint has great value. I'm just not ready to spring for the big bucks yet. I think the visualizations they put out like the ones I posted are very helpful for golfers playing for a few years like me to get some of the basic concepts. I have a chance!  Interesting. I probably suffer from both, but distance control may have been a bit more of an issue, because I hadn't even correctly identified that my putter had an off-center sweet spot when I started.
    • Bought the wrong flex wedge... should I return?
      I hope it's not the club maker that was in that condition? In general, the salesmen don't really know anything about club making. Ask specifically for the club maker and he can do what you ask. In any case what @70sSanO suggested makes perfect sense, but I'm not sure how much you planned to cut. You'd need to cut quite a bit to get a different flex number. Here's my favorite shaft the DG. http://www.golfshaftreviews.info/index.php/dynamic-gold-golf-club-shaft-review/ Notice that you'd need to cut an inch or so to get kind of the same flex from one to the other. The actual difference is about 2", but you have to fudge the overall effect of having a shorter shaft. For instance, S300 might be perfect for your shorter irons, but might be too flexible for the long irons. That effect will be somewhat unpredictable and might require a lot of iteration.   A modern Wedge flex has a specific kick point. They have a strange taper to help spin the ball better. http://www.mizunoforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=1453 In the past there probably was no difference. . .   That's better only more expensive, and shortening from the tip will stiffen it only a little bit. If you are getting something like an S300, it might still not be optimal as it is generally lower launching. You might want to have a higher launching shaft for a wedge. R flex might have been okay. Give the R a good testing before switching out to see if you like the stiff more or not? My advice is to try a bunch of wedges (used or otherwise) at your local store to find one that gives you your best launch conditions for a wedge. I haven't done this myself, but I have many friends who have gotten them fitted and they love their wedges now. The stock Mack Daddy and MD 2 seem to be perfect for me anyway. Haven't tried the others as they were not on sale, but I would guess any of the stock shafts would be fine for me.
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

    No users celebrating today
  • Blog Entries