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Miura Wedges

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I am interested in getting fitted and buying a Miura 52* gap wedge and 56* sand wedge. The closest place to do so it about 70 miles away from me and was quoted $256.00 each per wedge. Two things, one are these wedges that much better than all the other wedges put out by the quality manufacturers and second is that price about the going rate? Hope some of you on this site can send a little directive and info my way. Thank you in advance.

post #2 of 29

For that price, I'm hoping you are getting the 1957 wedge series. For a 1957 Series, that price is in line.

 

Are they worth it? If they fit you and your swing. If the sole glides through the turf nicely and doesn't dig. Does it open nicely, can you lower your hands, put the shaft back or slightly forward, and hit  versatile shots without worrying about the club doing its job?

 

Worth is relative - If the wedge fits, I find Miura more solid and dense than other wedges. Are they better? That gets back to fit. They are "better" in that their tolerances and specs are very, very tight - so your club maker doesn't have to add tip weights or other accessories to assemble the club.

 

But what's important is that the wedge fits your swing and looks good to your eye. I love the look of the Satin Chrome Miuras.

 

But if the club doesn't fit, you'll be buying Vokey, Mizunos, etc, looking for that elusive fit.

 

Get fit for grind, shaft, length, lie, grip, etc. And have fun.

post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much. I've played Cleveland wedges forever and getting fit is probably the best way to go. Might lose a couple strokes swinging a wedge that is fit for my swing instead of the other way around.
 

post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaxGolfer1 View Post

Thank you very much. I've played Cleveland wedges forever and getting fit is probably the best way to go. Might lose a couple strokes swinging a wedge that is fit for my swing instead of the other way around.
 

You are on the right track - get fit, feel what the club head is doing through the turf. See if it is sticking or gliding, have the guy adjust for lie if you've got some stickiness, and then you can see if the sole of the club is working for you. Try a variety of shots, bunker, rough, tight, and normal. Don't be afraid of the bounce numbers - I can hit the 1957 C grind with 15 of bounce off tightish lies, even flop it, by using the bounce and correct technique. Just make sure it glides and flight on partials is consistent.

 

 

Check the launch monitor for shafts to make certain you're getting the spin you want, and bring your own golf balls.

 

I like the 1957 K Grind for a 56, and the Miura Y Grinds for the lower lofted wedge. Check them out.

post #5 of 29

I remember the pics of some senior tour players with Miura in the bag. At least a couple of them (Nick Price was one I think) had lead tape all over them. I've seen a lot of Cleveland blades like that too (a lot!!). .Mizuno and newer Titleist not so much -  I wonder if the player changed his mind on what felt good?

post #6 of 29

Ya, Miura makes great gear, but you have to get a club that is meant for you.

 

I'm strongly considering getting fitted for wedges, and buying a full set. And now having read Iacas' reviews, im strongly considering Edel. a set of 52, 56, 60, and 64 custom wedges. (no, I would never carry all 4 on top of my pitching wedge, but its nice to be able to switch out different wedges based on the courses im playing, as I know my strength's and weaknesses on the 3 courses I regularly play. Miura is another consideration. Both are available within range of me, so I really would like to try both and see what fits be better. They are all amazing though.

post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

I remember the pics of some senior tour players with Miura in the bag. At least a couple of them (Nick Price was one I think) had lead tape all over them. I've seen a lot of Cleveland blades like that too (a lot!!). .Mizuno and newer Titleist not so much -  I wonder if the player changed his mind on what felt good?

Nick the Quick may have wanted a heavier feel in the head, thus the added weight. 

post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

I remember the pics of some senior tour players with Miura in the bag. At least a couple of them (Nick Price was one I think) had lead tape all over them. I've seen a lot of Cleveland blades like that too (a lot!!). .Mizuno and newer Titleist not so much -  I wonder if the player changed his mind on what felt good?

Nick the Quick may have wanted a heavier feel in the head, thus the added weight. 

 

Maybe he didn't get a proper fitting.

post #9 of 29

Miuras are great wedges.  Ive demoed them in the past and they are equally as good as anything else out there but IMO they arent worth $256 each.  Its just a golf clubs.  Its not magic and the Miura name isnt worth paying over twice as much for IMO.

post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitleistWI View Post

Miuras are great wedges.  Ive demoed them in the past and they are equally as good as anything else out there but IMO they arent worth $256 each.  Its just a golf clubs.  Its not magic and the Miura name isnt worth paying over twice as much for IMO.

Yes, but when you buy Miura from their dealers, you are supposedly doing it up close and personal, and doing it by demo and launch monitor, getting fit for all aspects of a wedge, other than a custom grind, which some can do or send specs to Miura, if you really want that work. Theoretically, the price is for a fit wedge, including choice of head, shaft, length, and grip. Miura-san will do a grind, but that will cost more, and the wait ...

post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Yes, but when you buy Miura from their dealers, you are supposedly doing it up close and personal, and doing it by demo and launch monitor, getting fit for all aspects of a wedge, other than a custom grind, which some can do or send specs to Miura, if you really want that work. Theoretically, the price is for a fit wedge, including choice of head, shaft, length, and grip. Miura-san will do a grind, but that will cost more, and the wait ...


So you are paying $136 to be fit for 1 club??? 

post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by TitleistWI View Post


So you are paying $136 to be fit for 1 club??? 

Another ridiculous response.

 

C'mon, you're going to pay more for a Japanese Forging than a China or Thai forging. And you're are getting a club renowned for the tightest specs around. And you're getting a club that is hand ground by the owner and his sons, who also sit on the line. At one time, Mr. Miura hand ground all the K grind wedges. I feel the difference in the heads in the solidity/density of the club.

 

And yes, you will pay more for this head because of all of the above and the fitting. And if the club grind doesn't fit, you can say "no."I won't get into the question of worth or value. It is worth it to some and not to others. I don't knock people for wanting a Mercedes or BMW instead of a Lincoln, Caddy, Chevy or Ford. If you want a Ford  or Chevy, that's great.

 

And people save money if they buy a more expensive club that actually fits them as opposed to buying something, trading it in, and buying something else - so they end up paying more money and wasting more time buying a lot of more inexpensive wedges because they do not buy what fits them.  Typically, people see a commercial, try out a friend's wedge, are talked into a wedge by a salesguy, hit a few wedges from artificial turf and pronounce themselves good to go - then they find they are not good to go on the course. So going through the fitting process, whether Edel, Miura, Titleist, etc,. Getting the more expensive wedges can have you spending less money. Since your handle is Titleist, let's see, a custom cast Vokey TVD can set you back $225 without a fitting.

 

Look, I don't always buy expensive wedges, but when I do, I'd prefer to get fit for an Edel or Miura.

 

Although I do like the retail SM4 Vokeys because the ones I have fit me.

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by TitleistWI View Post


So you are paying $136 to be fit for 1 club??? 

Another ridiculous response.

 

C'mon, you're going to pay more for a Japanese Forging than a China or Thai forging. And you're are getting a club renowned for the tightest specs around. And you're getting a club that is hand ground by the owner and his sons, who also sit on the line. At one time, Mr. Miura hand ground all the K grind wedges. I feel the difference in the heads in the solidity/density of the club.

 

And yes, you will pay more for this head because of all of the above and the fitting. And if the club grind doesn't fit, you can say "no."I won't get into the question of worth or value. It is worth it to some and not to others. I don't knock people for wanting a Mercedes or BMW instead of a Lincoln, Caddy, Chevy or Ford. If you want a Ford  or Chevy, that's great.

 

And people save money if they buy a more expensive club that actually fits them as opposed to buying something, trading it in, and buying something else - so they end up paying more money and wasting more time buying a lot of more inexpensive wedges because they do not buy what fits them.  Typically, people see a commercial, try out a friend's wedge, are talked into a wedge by a salesguy, hit a few wedges from artificial turf and pronounce themselves good to go - then they find they are not good to go on the course. So going through the fitting process, whether Edel, Miura, Titleist, etc,. Getting the more expensive wedges can have you spending less money. Since your handle is Titleist, let's see, a custom cast Vokey TVD can set you back $225 without a fitting.

 

Look, I don't always buy expensive wedges, but when I do, I'd prefer to get fit for an Edel or Miura.

 

Although I do like the retail SM4 Vokeys because the ones I have fit me.

 

 

I've had my Mizuno and Ben Hogan wedges bent a dozen times based on how I'm hitting the ball and what gaps i'm trying to fill. It's certainly a personal choice how we spend our money, but to me no forged wedge with the right grind is worth any more than the next one.

post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean_miller View Post

 

 

I've had my Mizuno and Ben Hogan wedges bent a dozen times based on how I'm hitting the ball and what gaps i'm trying to fill. It's certainly a personal choice how we spend our money, but to me no forged wedge with the right grind is worth any more than the next one.


Exactly.  No wedge, even a forged and fitted one is worth $250.  Its amazing the reasons that some people will come up with to convince themselves that they arent being ripped off.

post #15 of 29

It's amazing how a little bit of marketing can convince so many people that an item which is mass produced, albeit in smaller numbers than most OEMs is something other than a mass produced item.

There is the video of the Miura forging process and people marvel at it as if they were watching the birth of an ancient Samurai sword and even make that ludicrous analogy.

If the video was of a TM factory, the same folk would talk about it being a sweat shop and a production line, which it is, but there persists the notion that Miura San b1_ohmy.gif presides over the construction of your wedge in a way somehow different to te way the other hundreds made every day are made.

TaylorMade make 8 million clubs a year. Miura make considerably less, but their process is pretty much like others'. As for custom "grinds" (makes you feel so pro doesn't it) gawd, give me  a break.

 

I'm all for having nice gear, and have been called a club ho and I'm not at all embarrassed by it, but when it comes to wedges, they are much of a muchness and you just have to find a shape and finish that sits well with you.

Ultimately a couple of hundred dollars is still cheap in my eyes but I just don'y like the notion that perceived rarity = better.

 

My issue with fitting  is this: "Who is doing the fitting?"

Your U.S. market is bigger than ours and there are probably only a few in Oz who I'd take any notice of but would love the opportunity to be fitted by someone who rally knows their stuff and isn't pushing a brand.  Hopefully, some you guys have fitters that you can trust, but the idea of going to a golfing WalMart equivalent and being fitted by a kid and a faulty launch monitor ain't my idea of a positive move.

post #16 of 29

Shorty, what you always fail to grasp is that things are worth what people will pay for them. If someone's excited about x or y, and thinks they got a deal, then for once just be happy for them or don't say anything. Though you and I both know the process by which some wedges are made (forged vs. cast) has next to nothing to do with it, people still buy into the hype. So what? At some point, just let them be happy with their new sticks. You don't have to be the cloud that appears every time someone says the word "forged."

 

FWIW, the Edel wedges (the cast versions - the forged ones are pricy and feel no different, they're just available in different finishes) ARE worth it because they offer:

  • customized fit for bounce
  • customized fit for lie angle/length
  • customized fit for shaft (height/spin of shot)
  • customized stamping
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Desmond View Post
Look, I don't always buy expensive wedges, but when I do, I'd prefer to get fit for an Edel or Miura.

 

But, more importantly, do you drink Dos Equis?

 

Stay thirsty, my friend.c2_beer.gif

post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harmonious View Post

But, more importantly, do you drink Dos Equis?

 

Stay thirsty, my friend.c2_beer.gif

I don't always drink beer, but when I do, Dos Equis is on a short list.

 

As to the thread, and forged v. cast, and expensive v. inexpensive, best high lofted wedge so far for me was a Bridgestone WC Design 60 (cast 8620) - I could do anything with it during the season I practiced the Phil Mick hinge and hold - 40 yards? Stick it to 3 feet, and I mean "stick." I had complete confidence in that stick. Didn't play for a couple of years and bought some conforming wedges. Now I have a retail Vokey as my 60-10. Am gaining the same level of confidence with it. But am intrigued by an Edel fitting.

 

As to feel of forged v. cast, no difference on almost all shots. I can gleam something on very delicate chips - that's about it - for me, it's a more solid or dense feel. Does it make a difference in shotmaking? No. But it may make a mental difference to some people and golf is a game of confidence (like any game). So go at it - spend what you want and enjoy life.

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