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diet/exercise advice!

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

So one month before the start of my golf season and I find myself at my heaviest, 224 on a 5’7” frame. my wife in now threatening to put me on medifast just to slim down, 20lbs. I should not say threaten, but it was suggested, since she is now down 25 and doing very well. I don’t eat a lot of junk food and I exercise as much as possible. I currently have a severely sore lower back and tendentious in my left shoulder ( I actually think I I was mis diagnosed, since it really hurts when I raise my arm to brush back my hair, but only in the motion. Golf swing if FINE!) I am looking for any feedback or changes I can make to help me get away from feeling like a chunk! I figure dropping a few will help with the back and hopefully shoulder. at almost 39, I feel beat up, fat and old! I will say my exercise is as follows, I walk on my 15 minute break every day. I walk 30 minute on my lunch I walk 30 minutes on the treadmill at home 3 to 4 times a week ( I can not run in the house, treadmill will cause shit to fall off walls) I curl 25lb dumbbell 3 set of 10, 4 times a week. I lift a 10lb dumbbells in shoulder press (straight up) and other lifts in following my physical therapy for my shoulder. I have a kettlebell, but have been unable to establish a routine, especially since my back popped. Anyway below is a list of what I eat on a daily basis, ( it should be noted that my wife is on medifast, so I have been eating her dinners. 6 oz meat and various greens (lean & green) Daily eating: 8 am oatmeal 10 am yogurt 12:30 salad with 2 hardboiled eggs, banana 3 pm granola bar or apple 6 pm Lean & green Late night-rice cake w/ hummas or Natural PB I already take various vitamins. I currently take an over 50 organic pack from GNC (it was on sale), but may switch to their energy/metabolism. I must say, I do not have the time to go to the gym and have 2 small kids, so most excersice is done at home. I only drink beer on weekends and only a few. I will not give this up and will begin to drink on golf night. That is just the way it is. I am looking just to slim down, with out having to listen to my wife rant about medifast and my going on it. It works for her and I am happy about that. But it is not for me! Any advice would be appreciated!

post #2 of 25

Medifast meals, i could make those on my own and save labor, shipping, and profits. 

 

So question, it looks like you eat a healthy diet, is this just something you started now? The reason is, it seems you ballooned to 224 lbs over time, and now realized you need to loose the weight. 

 

There are many weight loss routines out there, but all of them have this in common, you eat less than you take in. Now its a bit more complicated than that over the long run. Not going into technical details, we have a hormone called Leptin that basically tells our body how much fat we have stored, how many calories we take in, how many calories we burn, and in doing so regulates our energy out put to do one thing, stave off starvation. This is why we are able to pack on fat after fat, yet is very hard to get overly skinny with out years of starvation. So basically, if you constantly eat less calories than you take in, your body will adjust and slow down the metabolism so you don't loose fat as fast. This is called the plateau we all hit.

 

But a general guideline would be, do as your doing now, recording everything you eat. If you stay off processed foods its easier, because there nutritional labels can be highly inaccurate. Basically figure out what keeps your weight stable, and then reduce what you eat. I would reduce fat and carbs, and keep protein higher than you think. Just because this wards off hunger, fats and carbs are very enjoyable to eat and prone to overeating them.. 

 

It sounds like you have the minimum of working out, so i would put your resting metabolic rate at 2050 calories. 

 

If you have a desk job, then i would put your maintenance level of calories around: 2700 calories, just by what you said your activity level was. 

 

So i would eat probably around 2200-2300 calories a day

 

But i wouldn't keep that  up for more than a week, then i would have a few days of higher calorie intake, maintenance level amount. Just to keep your body from thinking its starving. You could try fasting as well, one day a week, at least 18 hours with out food, but that is more advanced stuff, and might be for you.

post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info. my balloning comes from the holiday season, when I became Gluttonous. Of course my wife was doing the same at the time. I have always ate basically what I have described. During the golf season I tend to eat a sandwich on golf days, instead of a salad. I also down a few beers. I have always had piss poor metabolism. I have fasted in the past (for religous reasons), but I can eat light or not at all, drop a few pounds, then eat 2 slices of pizza and up I go. Of course if I do any amount of lifing, squating, running and build muscle I also seem to gain aswell. I do track what I eat by using myfitnesspal app and it always tells me I am under eating. I just dont know what else to eat. And when I do I feel overly full! I have 1 month until I tee off, and I am going to try to stay on track with what I eat! Thanks!
post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
I should also mention that according to the fitness app I use to track my food, they have me eating between 1300 & 1600 calories a day!
post #5 of 25

Personally I know you can find much better alternatives than Medifast.  As a fitness trainer, who specializes in golf specific fitness training and nutrition, I'd be happy to go over a few ideas.

 

For starters, Medifast is known to be extremely low in calories overall.  The majority of the foods are processed, and the recommendations for calories per meal and for the day are too low.  Will you lose weight?  Yes.  Did your wife lose weight?  Sure.  But let me ask you this..out of that 20 lbs, how much of it was bodyfat and how much was lean muscle tissue? 

 

The problem with Medifast, Hcg, WW, etc are that the calories are very restrictive and get people initial results.  But the programs are very hard to stick with, and during the weight loss phase, one typically loses a substantial amount of lean muscle tissue.  Each lb. of muscle you lose, you burn approx. 30 calories less/day doing the same activity.  This makes it very hard to keep the weight off long-term.

 

The most successful way I've found, utilized myself, and have recommended to clients, family and friends is to learn how to stabilize your blood sugar.  This formula is based on human physiology.  If your blood sugar is stable (between 80-120 mg/dl), you're in a state of homeostatis, where you have the ability to maintain/build muscle, along with burn bodyfat.  If your blood sugar spikes, you store fat.  If it drops, you will burn muscle.  The more stable you are 24/7, the better.  Does this mean you cut out all your carbs?  No.  It does mean that you should be eating 6-8 small meals throughout the day, every 2-3 hrs.  And all meals & snacks are the same amounts of calories..no big meals and small snacks.  This also means we should be consuming protein, healthy carbohydrates and fat at EACH MEAL.  This allows us to minimize our cravings, maximize our energy, build/maintain muscle and lose fat.

 

This is just the tip of the iceberg, and is really a very easy concept to grasp and take advantage of.  Please inbox me if you have any further questions.  I'm located in the Portland, OR area if anyone locally is interested in finding out more face to face, as well.

 

Mark

post #6 of 25

I am confused as to how you are at the weight and height you say you are at if in fact you do stick to the diet you described. Eating right is all about spreading out your meals throughout the day like MARK ^^^^^^ just said.  which it seems you do just fine.  The only thing I would change is cut out that PB snack at night.  You don't need to be consuming the fat and amount of calories that is in PB at that time of day.  Save that for earlier and snack on fruit or carrots before bed.  Other than that, the diet you laid out is very good and there really is no way of gaining unwanted weight on that diet when it is combined with exercise.  In fact if you wanted to put on muscle as well as getting rid of unneccessary weight you would need to be eating more than you listed.  But as for weightloss, that diet is pretty good.   You should up your exercise times.  Go on a 90 min brisk walk around the neighborhood 4 or 5 times a week.

post #7 of 25

From what I see reading your post is that you take in a lot of carbs and not much protein.  And I also think that 1300-1600 calories for a man of your size is not enough.  I know you are trying to lose but if you make a drastic drop, then you are asking for a crashed metabolism.  I eat about 13140 cals a week and you are eating 10150 a week.  I am on a cutting diet to lose body fat as you are, but I eat 3k calories more per week than you and I weigh 188lbs at 5'8".  So, I would do some more research on your calories.  The only way to find out what is right "for you" is trial and error.

 

The best thing to do is track you calories, get a better calorie base, and watch your macros.

 

I won't get any further into this discussion than this.....the 6-8 meals a day every 2-3 hours has been debunked a while ago.   You don't have to eat like that to get lean.  That's not to say it doesn't work, but if you have a lifestyle as I do....that's impossible.

post #8 of 25
I'm unsure as to where your info. is coming from that debunks my suggestions. If your point is one can lose weight by means other than stable blood sugar & eating small, consistent, equal and balanced meals like 500 k/cal per day on hcg or 1000 on Medifast, then I understand. But you also grasp the concept that Elmer's metabolism will suffer with his calories being too low. To be in a constant anabolic state/positive nitrogen state allowing for lean muscle gain, or at least in a neutral state while losing bodyfat, it is the smartest, safest and most effective method. Everyone has a busy schedule, which is incredibly understandable. My job, as a nutrition expert, is to show people how to make those meals work for them in their crazy & demanding schedules. It can be done.
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinderFitness View Post

Personally I know you can find much better alternatives than Medifast.  As a fitness trainer, who specializes in golf specific fitness training and nutrition, I'd be happy to go over a few ideas.

 

For starters, Medifast is known to be extremely low in calories overall.  The majority of the foods are processed, and the recommendations for calories per meal and for the day are too low.  Will you lose weight?  Yes.  Did your wife lose weight?  Sure.  But let me ask you this..out of that 20 lbs, how much of it was bodyfat and how much was lean muscle tissue? 

 

The problem with Medifast, Hcg, WW, etc are that the calories are very restrictive and get people initial results.  But the programs are very hard to stick with, and during the weight loss phase, one typically loses a substantial amount of lean muscle tissue.  Each lb. of muscle you lose, you burn approx. 30 calories less/day doing the same activity.  This makes it very hard to keep the weight off long-term.

 

The most successful way I've found, utilized myself, and have recommended to clients, family and friends is to learn how to stabilize your blood sugar.  This formula is based on human physiology.  If your blood sugar is stable (between 80-120 mg/dl), you're in a state of homeostatis, where you have the ability to maintain/build muscle, along with burn bodyfat.  If your blood sugar spikes, you store fat.  If it drops, you will burn muscle.  The more stable you are 24/7, the better.  Does this mean you cut out all your carbs?  No.  It does mean that you should be eating 6-8 small meals throughout the day, every 2-3 hrs.  And all meals & snacks are the same amounts of calories..no big meals and small snacks.  This also means we should be consuming protein, healthy carbohydrates and fat at EACH MEAL.  This allows us to minimize our cravings, maximize our energy, build/maintain muscle and lose fat.

 

This is just the tip of the iceberg, and is really a very easy concept to grasp and take advantage of.  Please inbox me if you have any further questions.  I'm located in the Portland, OR area if anyone locally is interested in finding out more face to face, as well.

 

Mark

 

 

Note, a few things you mentioned are myths. They might fit in your experience, but that might just be coincidental. 

 

1) regards to blood sugar levels. Carbs are not a required nutrient, period. Your body can produce all the glycogen it needs and will do so. Your body doesn't burn muscle if you are low on carbohydrates, because your body will burn fat. If you eat enough protein per day, then it doesn't matter if you eat carbs or not, you will not loose muscle, unless your very low in body fat, then your body will start to do some weird stuff because it will sense its in starvation. If your not eating enough protein, than you only need about 50 grams per day to stave off muscle loss. 

 

2) that 30 calories less per for every lb of muscle is a myth. Research done shows that 1 lb of muscle at rest burns 6 calories per day, not 30. This is more proven by the fact that 20-25% of RMR is from skeletal muscle. Meaning, if you weight 280 lbs, 6', 25 years old you have a RMR of 2555, which means that skeletal muscle makes up 575 calories. If we assumed 30 calories per lb of muscle, you would only have 19 lbs of skeletal muscle. Which would mean, his skeletal muscle makes up only 6.8% of his body. If we take 6 calories per day, your looking at 95lbs of muscle, or 34%, which is much closer to the average of 42% for a human. So the math just doesn't work for that. If you were an average male, lets say 200 lbs, with 42% skeletal muscle, your looking at 84lbs, which if you assumed 30 calories per lb, that alone makes 2520 calories, which is over the RMR for a 200 lb person. Doesn't work

 

3) multiple meals might work for alot of people, but its not the only way. I know people who eat one big meal and fast the rest of the day and have no problems. Personally for me, i do 3 meals a day. I tried the smaller meals, but i didn't like it, not my thing. As for the whole stabilize the blood sugar, if your not dumping tons of simple carbs into your blood, you wont be spiking your blood sugar much at all, and it wont matter. As i said before, muscle loss is dependent on carbs only if you don't eat enough protein.  

 

Basically, if you look in terms of marcro-nutrients, protein is the odd-ball, while carbs and fat work inversely with each other. Meaning, if you eat carbs you are going to burn them, then go back to fat. Its just how it works, your body is wired to burn carbs first. 

 

My suggestion, pick the amount of protein you want to eat, i recommend at least 100 grams, i try to break the 100 gram barrier every day, working out or not. I try to eat protein with each meal. The reason is, how good food taste. Every try to eat a ton of plain baked chicken, you can't. Its just not tasty, why, its all protein, little fat. Fat and carbs taste good. Though, whole grains are a bit different, i can not eat plain oatmeal, its just not good. So if you eat protein with each meal, specifically lean proteins, you will get fuller faster, and stay fuller longer. If you eat just carbs and fats, you will not stay full very long. This is why if you eat a big steak versus a big bowl of pasta, the steak will keep you full longer. 

 

for me, i like to eat what i want, as long as i have enough proten. I've had higher carb days and higher fat days, and i felt the same for both. I don't have blood sugar crashes, unless i indulge and start having simple sugars. So i know my blood sugar is very stable. What i like to do is, spend about a week at lower calories, for me around 2000-2200, then i will jump up to 3000 for a day, just to tell my body i am not starving, because Leptin will slow down fat loss. 

post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinderFitness View Post

I'm unsure as to where your info. is coming from that debunks my suggestions. If your point is one can lose weight by means other than stable blood sugar & eating small, consistent, equal and balanced meals like 500 k/cal per day on hcg or 1000 on Medifast, then I understand. But you also grasp the concept that Elmer's metabolism will suffer with his calories being too low. To be in a constant anabolic state/positive nitrogen state allowing for lean muscle gain, or at least in a neutral state while losing bodyfat, it is the smartest, safest and most effective method. Everyone has a busy schedule, which is incredibly understandable. My job, as a nutrition expert, is to show people how to make those meals work for them in their crazy & demanding schedules. It can be done.

 

The info is out there.  This is what I meant by not getting into it any deeper. I could find a ton of articles on this subject but so can you.  I worked with a VERY well known trainer (actually a genius...literally) and the healthiest he had ever been and the best he had ever felt was on the warrior diet (basically, he made a few adjustments) which completely goes against the many meals a day being best theory. ,

 

Bottom line pertaining to this poster and losing weight is that it's MUCH more important to make sure you hit your macros by the end of the day than it is to worry about eating every 2 hours.  After all, you eat every few hours every day but if you miss your macros, then it was all for not.

 

 

Like I said, I'm not saying your suggestions were incorrect.  I'm just saying that years ago everyone said "Oh you HAVE to eat 6-8 smaller meals a day at a frequency of every few hours to get the best results" and that is just not true.  Your suggestions will absolutely work.  They are just thrown out there so much as the standard that must be followed and personally, I believe, that mentality leads to many people falling off their diets.  For someone that's not going to be competing in a show, worrying about eating that often is just too much for the average joe.  Eating clean is no problem for them.  Putting together 4 or 5 meals and having to find the time to eat them during their busy day at work gets to be overwhelming.  Now that part is just my opinion.

 

And I am by NO MEANS a nutritionist but I have been reading this stuff for years and years now.   Have you read Alan Aragon's studies?

post #11 of 25

First off, I want to state that both of you have some very valid points.  The majority of clients I've seen in my nine years as a fitness professional average 1-2 meals a day (including snacks.)  So to ask them to eat 6-8 meals a day is very challenging.  However, asking a person to go from 2 to 4 or 3 to 5 is a big step in the right direction, and we can work from there.

 

As of 2012, nearly 70% of our population is considered overweight, and half of that 70% is considered obese.  By 2020, it's estimated that 70% of Americans will be obese and the same percentage will have diabetes.  People try multiple diets to lose weight.  Medifast, Jenny Craig, Weight Watchers, Hcg, NutriSystems, following the old school method of 'calories in vs calories out'.....they're all diets.  If any of them had significant scientific proof, why are there so many?  Why do people go from one to another?  And why do most people start a 2nd diet at a heavier weight than the first, original diet?  Diets restrict calories and needed nutrients.  And simply eating more protein isn't the end-all problem solver.  I can provide research on how a person will not absorb specific types of protein if they're lacking specific vitamins/minerals.  Calories in vs out is based on the law of thermodynamics, discovered by Sir Isaac Newton.  Basically if a person burns 2,000 cal/day and they consume 1,500/day, they'll be at a 500 calorie deficit and will lose 1 lb/week (3500 cal +/- equals 1 lb gained/lost.)

 

However, simply following this formula rarely works long-term.  If a person consumes 1500 calories of chicken breasts only, or licorice, or 1 meal at McDonalds, they will not get consistent results.  And they won't feel good, sustain energy, and keep cravings/mood swings under control. 

 

Teaching a person blood sugar stabilization allows a person to eat a good percentage of the foods they enjoy...just in the right portions and percentages.  For instance, Elmer would do great at a 40% protein, 35% carbohydrate and 25% fat ratio.  This would be, for example, 40g protein, 35g carbs and 11g fat per meal, adding up to 400 calories.  Do this 5-6 times and you're definitely on the right track.  The body knows if it's being restricted in calories in general.  And it knows if you have a chicken breast for lunch and miss the healthy fat and carbohydrates.  Same thing if you eat a bag of chips for lunch and miss your protein and healthy fat.   

 

One of you mentioned "carbs are not a required nutrient..period."  Let me ask you a question.  How many servings of fruits/vegetables do you get per day?  Zero?  Four?  Twelve?  Fruits & veggies are carbohydrates, and are absolutely essential from a macro, micro and phyto-nutrient standpoint.  Do you know the majority of disease we suffer from, as part of the Western Society, is due to malnutrition and inflammation?  Free radicals form from virtually everything we encounter (environmental pollution, stress, smoking, and even working out/breathing itself.)  The only way to rid the body of cell-damaging free radicals is to consume antioxidants consistently (at least every 8-12 hours).  And antioxidants are in fruits & vegetables. 

 

If you've ever heard of Mark MacDonald, I would definitely check his info. out.  He has the following credentials:  Owns over 400 Venice Nutrition Centers across the country, is the spokesperson for CNN nutrition segments, is a spokesperson for American Diabetes Association, and is the author of his best-selling book "Body Confidence."  And he's a friend/colleague of mine. 

 

In summary, I've played golf for some 20 years.  And I know the swing/mechanics pretty well.  But I wouldn't think I could teach someone every aspect of playing golf.  One of you or both of you are club pro's.  That's your field of expertise.  However, the majority of information you've mentioned is 'out there' is outdated.  Both the best and the worst thing about the internet is you can find whatever you want.  If a person isn't focusing on blood sugar stabilization and eating small, consistent and well-balanced meals, they're choosing an old method, and may see some results for awhile.  But the track record of repeated diets and roller-coaster weight gain and loss proves my main point. 

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Once again thank you for the info. As to answer the question as to why I am the size I am, considering what I eat. I can only answer (unscientifically). My entire life I have been chubby. As I got older I maintained my beer gut. Even when I was a kid and playing Lacrosse, I was still chubby with a gut. I think I have very poor metabolism. I sit behind a desk all day, with exception of my 15 min & 30 minute walk. I keep really on pace with what I eat, except maybe one day a week where I may buy a tuna or Turkey wrap at the cafeteria. I notice that if I falter and have some pizza or Birthday cake (as it was just my daughters birthday) something like this sticks with me. Must not forget whiskey. I have a soft spot for a good glass of whiskey on the weekend! I once went to my Doctor to inquire as why it is really difficult for me to drop weight. Dr. Einstein told me I have to excersice more than I calorie intake. Which I knew. But after years or trial and error I find I have to walk and be active more then seditary. Just as of last night I took a walk on the treadmill and followed it up with kettlebell swings and a full minute of jumproping (babysteps) my heart was racing, which is good. I have ditched the PB (albeit all natural) and opted for almonds as a late night snack. I also found some organic "energy cubes" from the local organic store. Made of organic rice, wheat, berries etc..... But I am working on it and thank youfor your imput!
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinderFitness View Post

First off, I want to state that both of you have some very valid points.  The majority of clients I've seen in my nine years as a fitness professional average 1-2 meals a day (including snacks.)  So to ask them to eat 6-8 meals a day is very challenging.  However, asking a person to go from 2 to 4 or 3 to 5 is a big step in the right direction, and we can work from there.

 

As of 2012, nearly 70% of our population is considered overweight, and half of that 70% is considered obese.  By 2020, it's estimated that 70% of Americans will be obese and the same percentage will have diabetes.  People try multiple diets to lose weight.  Medifast, Jenny Craig, Weight Watchers, Hcg, NutriSystems, following the old school method of 'calories in vs calories out'.....they're all diets.  If any of them had significant scientific proof, why are there so many?  Why do people go from one to another?  And why do most people start a 2nd diet at a heavier weight than the first, original diet?  Diets restrict calories and needed nutrients.  And simply eating more protein isn't the end-all problem solver.  I can provide research on how a person will not absorb specific types of protein if they're lacking specific vitamins/minerals.  Calories in vs out is based on the law of thermodynamics, discovered by Sir Isaac Newton.  Basically if a person burns 2,000 cal/day and they consume 1,500/day, they'll be at a 500 calorie deficit and will lose 1 lb/week (3500 cal +/- equals 1 lb gained/lost.)

 

However, simply following this formula rarely works long-term.  If a person consumes 1500 calories of chicken breasts only, or licorice, or 1 meal at McDonalds, they will not get consistent results.  And they won't feel good, sustain energy, and keep cravings/mood swings under control. 

 

Teaching a person blood sugar stabilization allows a person to eat a good percentage of the foods they enjoy...just in the right portions and percentages.  For instance, Elmer would do great at a 40% protein, 35% carbohydrate and 25% fat ratio.  This would be, for example, 40g protein, 35g carbs and 11g fat per meal, adding up to 400 calories.  Do this 5-6 times and you're definitely on the right track.  The body knows if it's being restricted in calories in general.  And it knows if you have a chicken breast for lunch and miss the healthy fat and carbohydrates.  Same thing if you eat a bag of chips for lunch and miss your protein and healthy fat.   

 

One of you mentioned "carbs are not a required nutrient..period."  Let me ask you a question.  How many servings of fruits/vegetables do you get per day?  Zero?  Four?  Twelve?  Fruits & veggies are carbohydrates, and are absolutely essential from a macro, micro and phyto-nutrient standpoint.  Do you know the majority of disease we suffer from, as part of the Western Society, is due to malnutrition and inflammation?  Free radicals form from virtually everything we encounter (environmental pollution, stress, smoking, and even working out/breathing itself.)  The only way to rid the body of cell-damaging free radicals is to consume antioxidants consistently (at least every 8-12 hours).  And antioxidants are in fruits & vegetables. 

 

If you've ever heard of Mark MacDonald, I would definitely check his info. out.  He has the following credentials:  Owns over 400 Venice Nutrition Centers across the country, is the spokesperson for CNN nutrition segments, is a spokesperson for American Diabetes Association, and is the author of his best-selling book "Body Confidence."  And he's a friend/colleague of mine. 

 

In summary, I've played golf for some 20 years.  And I know the swing/mechanics pretty well.  But I wouldn't think I could teach someone every aspect of playing golf.  One of you or both of you are club pro's.  That's your field of expertise.  However, the majority of information you've mentioned is 'out there' is outdated.  Both the best and the worst thing about the internet is you can find whatever you want.  If a person isn't focusing on blood sugar stabilization and eating small, consistent and well-balanced meals, they're choosing an old method, and may see some results for awhile.  But the track record of repeated diets and roller-coaster weight gain and loss proves my main point. 



I'm on the "you don't need as much protein as everyone thinks" side here.  I've always thought my buddies were taking in too much protein.  Calories in vs calories is is true....as long as you are eating the right calories because as, we all know, a calorie is not a calorie.  My cutting diet is actually 40/25/35, p/c/f.  I am also not a believer in low carb diets.  Lower cards is a must I think, but the low to no carbs is not very healthy, IMO.

 

Here is the where I am on the other page.  From my reading and research, the "old method" is the consistent meals during the day.  The new methods are the Warrior diet style, IF, cheat day, etc..  Many bodybuilders use Keto but that is a no-low carb style that I don't really like.  Now I do a variation of Keto which allows carbs, but I will only run it for like 2 weeks just to dry me out if I'm getting ready for some kind of contest.

 

All of the lose fat fast diets you mentioned are terrible, IMHO...so I agree with you there.  But the IF, WD, etc....are tried and true.  The OP here is almost doing a Paleo style diet which is also a new fad....especially in the Cross fit world.

 

Anyway, I apologize for steering this thread down this road....but I do think the poster got some valuable info.  There are countless ways to lose weight as long as you are consistent.

 

 

Good conversation BinderFitness.   And I was in no way trying to discredit your info.  Just throwing out more options from my actual experience...not just spewing a bunch of rhetoric

post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinderFitness View Post

First off, I want to state that both of you have some very valid points.  The majority of clients I've seen in my nine years as a fitness professional average 1-2 meals a day (including snacks.)  So to ask them to eat 6-8 meals a day is very challenging.  However, asking a person to go from 2 to 4 or 3 to 5 is a big step in the right direction, and we can work from there.

 

As of 2012, nearly 70% of our population is considered overweight, and half of that 70% is considered obese.  By 2020, it's estimated that 70% of Americans will be obese and the same percentage will have diabetes.  People try multiple diets to lose weight.  Medifast, Jenny Craig, Weight Watchers, Hcg, NutriSystems, following the old school method of 'calories in vs calories out'.....they're all diets.  If any of them had significant scientific proof, why are there so many?  Why do people go from one to another?  And why do most people start a 2nd diet at a heavier weight than the first, original diet?  Diets restrict calories and needed nutrients.  And simply eating more protein isn't the end-all problem solver.  I can provide research on how a person will not absorb specific types of protein if they're lacking specific vitamins/minerals.  Calories in vs out is based on the law of thermodynamics, discovered by Sir Isaac Newton.  Basically if a person burns 2,000 cal/day and they consume 1,500/day, they'll be at a 500 calorie deficit and will lose 1 lb/week (3500 cal +/- equals 1 lb gained/lost.)

 

However, simply following this formula rarely works long-term.  If a person consumes 1500 calories of chicken breasts only, or licorice, or 1 meal at McDonalds, they will not get consistent results.  And they won't feel good, sustain energy, and keep cravings/mood swings under control. 

 

Teaching a person blood sugar stabilization allows a person to eat a good percentage of the foods they enjoy...just in the right portions and percentages.  For instance, Elmer would do great at a 40% protein, 35% carbohydrate and 25% fat ratio.  This would be, for example, 40g protein, 35g carbs and 11g fat per meal, adding up to 400 calories.  Do this 5-6 times and you're definitely on the right track.  The body knows if it's being restricted in calories in general.  And it knows if you have a chicken breast for lunch and miss the healthy fat and carbohydrates.  Same thing if you eat a bag of chips for lunch and miss your protein and healthy fat.   

 

One of you mentioned "carbs are not a required nutrient..period."  Let me ask you a question.  How many servings of fruits/vegetables do you get per day?  Zero?  Four?  Twelve?  Fruits & veggies are carbohydrates, and are absolutely essential from a macro, micro and phyto-nutrient standpoint.  Do you know the majority of disease we suffer from, as part of the Western Society, is due to malnutrition and inflammation?  Free radicals form from virtually everything we encounter (environmental pollution, stress, smoking, and even working out/breathing itself.)  The only way to rid the body of cell-damaging free radicals is to consume antioxidants consistently (at least every 8-12 hours).  And antioxidants are in fruits & vegetables. 

 

If you've ever heard of Mark MacDonald, I would definitely check his info. out.  He has the following credentials:  Owns over 400 Venice Nutrition Centers across the country, is the spokesperson for CNN nutrition segments, is a spokesperson for American Diabetes Association, and is the author of his best-selling book "Body Confidence."  And he's a friend/colleague of mine. 

 

In summary, I've played golf for some 20 years.  And I know the swing/mechanics pretty well.  But I wouldn't think I could teach someone every aspect of playing golf.  One of you or both of you are club pro's.  That's your field of expertise.  However, the majority of information you've mentioned is 'out there' is outdated.  Both the best and the worst thing about the internet is you can find whatever you want.  If a person isn't focusing on blood sugar stabilization and eating small, consistent and well-balanced meals, they're choosing an old method, and may see some results for awhile.  But the track record of repeated diets and roller-coaster weight gain and loss proves my main point. 

 

I can see the point if someone is eating one giant meal, then snacking with no regard to the quantity of what there eating by the end of the day. Changing it up does do one thing, it gets you thinking. honestly it might be better to fluctuate between 3 and 5 meals a day, ever couple of weeks, just to get yourself in the habit of not making bad habits, keeping you thinking of what your doing. Sometimes you start sneaking in a candy bar, or eating out, and soon your doing it every day, and wonder what the hell happened. Diets don't work because there diets, not life style changes. They don't work because food is engineered to make use eat more. They don't work because eating is not a primary function of life as it use to be. Imagine if you had to actually go track, kill, clean, cook your food. You will be greatly involved in what your eating, instead of sitting in a car and ordering fast food. So, its just the culture, it has nothing to do with small meals. Honestly, i am not going to poke myself 5 times a day to see if my blood sugar is in a 40 mg/dl range, that is just absurd to me. Really, from my personal experience, the only time i ever felt a sugar crash, or sugar high is when i eat simple sugars. Normal carbs, doesn't bother my blood sugar at all. So i know if i keep my simple carbs intake to a minimum, my blood sugar will be fine. 

 

To me, if you want to get people on track, get them to cook there own food. Stop buying foods with a ingredient list thats larger than your shopping list. Start keeping track of what you eat. There's a great piece done by Whole Health Source, a blog. Its a 5 part series on why we eat, and in reality, there are a whole lot of reason why we eat when we shouldn't. Majority of them are psychological. Ever felt like you got hungry, then got busy doing something else, found out that 3 hours later you haven't eaten and didn't feel hungry during that time. The mind can seriously trick you. 

 

No, in terms of how the body works, carbs are not required, your body can function totally on no carbs. Its just coincidental that a lot of vitamins the body needs are in fruits and vegetables. So, carbs in those regards are going to be eaten. In terms of muscle loss, if you eat sufficient protein you wont see significant muscle loss. Carbs do stave off muscle loss, but the quantity is very low as well. There are a lot of people on very low carb diets and gain muscle, there are alot of people who eat more carbs and gain muscle. The reason its coincidental is just the fact that items like, honey, sugar cane contain no nutrional value than carbs, while things like bananas contain potassium. Its coincidental that fruits are good for you in moderation due to the vitimins they give you. If fruits happen to have fat and protein, they could easily still contain the same vitimins. Spinach has very little carbs, but more Vitimin C per serving than Oranges. so even carb quantity doesn't relate to other nutritional value. 

post #15 of 25

Something a trainer told me that I will NEVER forget:

 

 

Eat to live, don't live to eat.

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TN94z View Post

Something a trainer told me that I will NEVER forget:

 

 

Eat to live, don't live to eat.

Great Saying, and Eat To Live is the name of the book Im currently reading.

post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TN94z View Post

Eat to live, don't live to eat.

 

And everything in moderation, including this.

 

I'm going to eat cheeseburgers and whatever other stuff I want. I do it in moderation, and eat a bit less now, and run now and then, and I'm doing just fine.

 

If we truly only "ate to live" I'm convinced by now we'd have a pill we could take every day that might cost $50 apiece but which would contain all of the energy and nutrients we need.

post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TN94z View Post

Eat to live, don't live to eat.

Food is one of life's great pleasures, I could never apply this philosophy. Some people just see food as "chow", something that must be done to survive. I'm not advocating stuffing yourself constantly with junk but to miss out on the joy of good food (with a stellar bottle of wine) is a tragedy akin to never discovering good literature or art IMHO. 

 

For the record, I'm not talking about Philly Cheesesteaks and Pizza here, I'm talking about Osso Buco and Duck Confit and Crème Brûlée!!!

 

MMMMMM, come on, you know you want it!

 

 

*my apologies to any vegetarians I may have harmed with this image.

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