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How much do Premium club really help?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I was thinking that their had to already be a thread on this, but I couldn't find it. So my question is how much to premium clubs actually help? Let's say if I gave a golfer with a 10 handicap a new set of clubs of his choice, and then another cheap full set that cost around $200, what difference would he/she expect to see? I'm asking for the obvious reason, and that being that I started off with a cheap set, and have been playing religiously since Febraury. Now, I'm starting to think about an upgrade but only if I was able to see a real benefit from it.
post #2 of 15

Well, with a $200 bag set, the manufacturer does not put as much engineering or quality into each of the clubs in the bag as premium manufacturers do. If you buy nicer clubs, you will not notice an extremely drastic change in your game, but you will start to notice that you're hitting further and straighter. In my opinion, once you realize that you really like the game and want to stick with it, you should upgrade. You will benefit from it.

post #3 of 15

The benefit would more than likely be in durability or *advanced technology.*

 

If the clubs work for you, there is no need to change unless you want to - new clubs are probably not going to improve your game or hurt it. But if you want them and can afford it, then why not?

post #4 of 15

I can't say I agree completely with the statement that it will not help or hurt you. If you have been playing with clubs that aren't really right for you then getting a set that has the right length, lie, flex will help. However if you are moving from game improvement irons to blades too quickly it will hurt your game.

 

However, going by your 10 handicap statement, you have your swing under pretty good control. While I don't advocate getting blades, a good set of clubs, as stated by Vinchenzio45, will most likely have you gaining some extra distance and direction control. These two things almost always lead to better scoring.

post #5 of 15

The more noticeable difference is in the fairway woods and hybrids. Those truly do make huge differences over el cheapo models.

 

Mid to long irons probably would not be as noticeable.

 

Cheap wedges though, those things are the devil. My dad had some till last year. They couldn't put backspin on a ball to save a life.

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

I can't say I agree completely with the statement that it will not help or hurt you. If you have been playing with clubs that aren't really right for you then getting a set that has the right length, lie, flex will help. However if you are moving from game improvement irons to blades too quickly it will hurt your game.

 

However, going by your 10 handicap statement, you have your swing under pretty good control. While I don't advocate getting blades, a good set of clubs, as stated by Vinchenzio45, will most likely have you gaining some extra distance and direction control. These two things almost always lead to better scoring.

Yeah, I was being general about the handicap being around 10. My isn't anywhere near that mark yet as I'm honestly around a 25.

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApocG10 View Post

The more noticeable difference is in the fairway woods and hybrids. Those truly do make huge differences over el cheapo models.

 

Mid to long irons probably would not be as noticeable.

 

Cheap wedges though, those things are the devil. My dad had some till last year. They couldn't put backspin on a ball to save a life.


This is largely dependent on the clubs they have and are going to. Ball flight, distance, and control are greatly effected by changing irons. Even going from a decent set of tour edge irons to the burner plus irons I gained about one club distance and a lot more control.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post


This is largely dependent on the clubs they have and are going to. Ball flight, distance, and control are greatly effected by changing irons. Even going from a decent set of tour edge irons to the burner plus irons I gained about one club distance and a lot more control.

Chances are that you did not gain 1 club of distance, you are probably hitting the same club with a different number stamped on it.

post #9 of 15

I know that burners are typically a little longer in shaft length, so that may account for some of the distance. But I used to hit a 9i for the 145yd par 3 and now I hit a PW for that same hole, pretty sure the PW isn't the same loft as the old 9i. Only change was the club. You can't honestly say that someone will not see a difference when going from the irons in a $130 box set to a good quality set of clubs that are fitted for at the very least shaft flex.
 

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post
 You can't honestly say that someone will not see a difference when going from the irons in a $130 box set to a good quality set of clubs that are fitted for at the very least shaft flex.

 

Without knowing the golfer, you can not say that they will notice a difference.

 

I do not believe in buying cheap equipment, but the op was smart in starting out that way.

 

But to compare one set of clubs with another saying the new set is longer is ludicrous.

 

I play with a guy like you, always bragging how he hits one less club than I do. He fails to understand that the shaft length of his 6 iron is not only longer than my 6, but also my 5.

 

How far someone hits a club is not important, it is knowing how far you hit each club.

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremie Boop View Post

I know that burners are typically a little longer in shaft length, so that may account for some of the distance. But I used to hit a 9i for the 145yd par 3 and now I hit a PW for that same hole, pretty sure the PW isn't the same loft as the old 9i. Only change was the club. You can't honestly say that someone will not see a difference when going from the irons in a $130 box set to a good quality set of clubs that are fitted for at the very least shaft flex.
 

The shafts are probably where the biggest difference is between a box set from Wal-Mart and a "premium" set. As well as feel from the club head. 

 

As for the lofts on the club, there is a reasonably high chance that your new PW is the same loft as your old 9. 

post #12 of 15

I don't care what club I hit for a distance, I just know that after changing clubs that's the result I have. I know the shaft is a little longer, something like 1/2 inch or less, of the new set compared to the old set. The fact the burner plus set I bought has a wider sole also helps me not catch shots "fat" as often than my old set which had a narrow sole much like a blade. I was also going by the fact the OP stated a 10 hc *which I saw he recanted and changed to 25* which would be a good point for them to move from a "cheap" set to a more premium club. You can try to associate me with some guy that bothers you because he is bragging, but I was simply stating the improvement I saw from changing irons and in no way was bragging. In the end, I believe, anyone can benefit from a proper set of clubs that are fitted to them, however you shouldn't spend a lot of money unless you truly wish to continue golfing and actually have the money to spend.

 

I would rather see someone have a cheap driver in their bag and a good set of irons and wedges than what you typically see, a high end driver and the rest of the clubs being a cheap or cobbled together set of clubs.
 

post #13 of 15

I know the loft isn't the same on the 2 PWs, but it definitely isn't the same as the 9i of the old set. The PW of the burner is 45 and the 9i of the old set is 43.

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post

Without knowing the golfer, you can not say that they will notice a difference.

 

I do not believe in buying cheap equipment, but the op was smart in starting out that way.

 

But to compare one set of clubs with another saying the new set is longer is ludicrous.

 

I play with a guy like you, always bragging how he hits one less club than I do. He fails to understand that the shaft length of his 6 iron is not only longer than my 6, but also my 5.

 

How far someone hits a club is not important, it is knowing how far you hit each club.


You also can not say they won't notice a difference. It is not ludicrous to say one set is longer than another as it's easily proven, whether it's length of the shaft, loft of the club, shaft flex/kickpoint or whatever that causes it. Other factors can cause it too, steel shaft or graphite, weight of shaft/head speeding up or slowing down swing speed.... I do agree completely that knowing how far you hit each club is invaluable and sometimes added distance is less help than added control.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post

The benefit would more than likely be in durability or *advanced technology.* ...

 

 

A boxed set will get you through the first couple of seasons if you play a couple of times a month. If you play twice a week from the start, you might tend to wear out some clubs. You are using them beyond their rated capacity.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinchenzio45 View Post

Well, with a $200 bag set, the manufacturer does not put as much engineering or quality into each of the clubs in the bag as premium manufacturers do. ...

 

The boxed sets have a good engineering background if made by a name-brand mfgr. But, the technology is at a plateau, and only minor tweaks will be made year-to year in the model.

 

After you have been playing a couple of years and your swing has stabilized - not gotten perfect, just consistent - you might benefit from custom fit clubs. Not sure what you mean by premium clubs. Most major club makers will let you get fit at a golf shop, and have club adjustments be made at the factory. Loft adjustments, shaft length, grip size...

 

Unless you change to super-expensive shafts or unusual grips, these custom-fitted clubs often won't cost any more than off-the-rack clubs. You probably won't get a price break, but any extra cost should be minimal. Also, a decent golf shop will check your irons when they arrive from the factory. The clubsmith will make sure the loft and lie of the irons meet factory specification, or the custom specifications you requested.

 

Do these premium/custom-fitted clubs really help? Yes, if you practice effectively to build your swing. But, you can't buy a golf swing... b1_ohmy.gif

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