Jump to content
IGNORED

"Five Lessons: The Modern Fundamentals of Golf" by Ben Hogan


iacas
 Share

Note: This thread is 1123 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Recommended Posts

5 lessons is the best book I have ever owned. I did a search on Hogan Books on Amazon and there are some new one's out as well Ben Hogan's Magical Device nad The One Plane Cut. Has anyone bought theses? I bought the one plane cut swing, it has the Hogan on the cover like in 5 lesson and it's black. I bought it and thought it was pretty good, just wanted to know if anyone else has read it and how you thought it compaired to 5 lesson.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Great book. Classic of course. When I first started a couple years ago, I learned out of 5 lessons. I'm still learning from it today. The book answers all those little questions a new golfer might have. Just following the recommendations on getting a good grip and rotating the left hip to start the downswing got me off on the right foot. I went from hitting sporadic shots with no clue what I was doing to hitting quality shots with some regularity, at least for someone starting out.

Now, my only criticism of the book would be the chapter on stance and posture. I recently struggled with my game, and am just now getting out of the funk after about a month of struggle, largely due to the setup. I feel that the chapter on setup is not exact enough. There are some general basic things, but there is a lot of room for variation. For instance, I struggled for a long time, and still do with how far to stand from the ball. I don't think Hogan mentions much on how far to stand, even though it's seemed in my experience to be a crucial part to the success of the swing overall. Also stuff like knee flex - the closest part is the reccomendation of sitting on a bar stool, about two inches below the bottom. So knee flex is mentioned in that regard. Also, the hands at address and shaft lean at address. Hogan just reccomends the ball to be placed off the left foot, but how about the hands? At the belt buckle, up near the left hip, toward the back hip? Anyway, all those little details about setup plagued me for a long time, and even though some of them are mentioned in a roundabout way, that is my only criticism of the book.

Altogether though, there's no filler, and Hogan writes the book with a tone of authority and certainty that instills confidence.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Now, my only criticism of the book would be the chapter on stance and posture. I recently struggled with my game, and am just now getting out of the funk after about a month of struggle, largely due to the setup. I feel that the chapter on setup is not exact enough. There are some general basic things, but there is a lot of room for variation. For instance, I struggled for a long time, and still do with how far to stand from the ball. I don't think Hogan mentions much on how far to stand, even though it's seemed in my experience to be a crucial part to the success of the swing overall.

with regards to setup, i think the reason why hogan does not mention it is because it is incumbent upon each golfer to find his own proper setup. because what we want to do with the ball can drastically change that. the easiest way to find where your ball should be in your stance is by taking the club, and swinging it back and forth in a swing plane that's comfortable for you for each club. get loose with about 10 swings back and forth, then start brushing the ground. the point at which you brush the ground with that given club will be where you should place the ball.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


5 lessons is the best book I have ever owned. I did a search on Hogan Books on Amazon and there are some new one's out as well Ben Hogan's Magical Device nad The One Plane Cut. Has anyone bought theses? I bought the one plane cut swing, it has the Hogan on the cover like in 5 lesson and it's black. I bought it and thought it was pretty good, just wanted to know if anyone else has read it and how you thought it compaired to 5 lesson.

What exactly did the book you bought go over?

Link to comment
Share on other sites


What exactly did the book you bought go over?

The book over all was short like 78 pages, but had several topic's in it. It starts out with the guys life and how Hogan was a big part of him coming to this new swing, the one plane cut. I thought the book was about Hogan's swing and it is, but it's about the swing the author created based off left to right players like Hogan, Duval and others common traits although, Hogan is the main focus. It has great photos in black and white some i've never seen before and talks about an angle in Hogan's hands that was one of his secrets, along with the clubs, setup, pivot, and other topic's. I also just ordered the Magical Device today, I have all of the books that are about Hogan and I collect other Hogan items. So, for me to say I like the one plane cut swing book being that i'm such a Hogan collector, is sorta big too me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


The book over all was short like 78 pages, but had several topic's in it. It starts out with the guys life and how Hogan was a big part of him coming to this new swing, the one plane cut. I thought the book was about Hogan's swing and it is, but it's about the swing the author created based off left to right players like Hogan, Duval and others common traits although, Hogan is the main focus. It has great photos in black and white some i've never seen before and talks about an angle in Hogan's hands that was one of his secrets, along with the clubs, setup, pivot, and other topic's. I also just ordered the Magical Device today, I have all of the books that are about Hogan and I collect other Hogan items. So, for me to say I like the one plane cut swing book being that i'm such a Hogan collector, is sorta big too me.

Would you recommend it to a player who is looking to improve his swing and only had five lessons?

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Would you recommend it to a player who is looking to improve his swing and only had five lessons?

That is a good question! Some books are difficult reads and some are easy reads. Most every book I have ever read "difficult ie: TGM" or "Easy ie: Golf for Dummies" I have always taken something away from them. To answer your question I would say yes, but! only you would be able to truly answer that. I would say if you like Hogan or you are interested in a more rounded pivot driven swing this would be a very good read.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


with regards to setup, i think the reason why hogan does not mention it is because it is incumbent upon each golfer to find his own proper setup. because what we want to do with the ball can drastically change that. the easiest way to find where your ball should be in your stance is by taking the club, and swinging it back and forth in a swing plane that's comfortable for you for each club. get loose with about 10 swings back and forth, then start brushing the ground. the point at which you brush the ground with that given club will be where you should place the ball.

That's a vital piece of info missed by so many books it's not even funny.

I had the same problem with the coverage of that, in Hogan's and many other books. It does need to be explained, as it can lead to problems.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


McGolf - So what books have you read that actually goes into details about the setup?

I should have said "how-to" guides, whether in books, magazines, or online. Magazines probably the worst culprits.

Point I'm getting at (perhaps badly) is that set up and distance from the ball are so critical, and they are often taken for granted. I think a lot more ink could be written on it. Book I just finished The Negotiable Golf Swing by Joe Laurentino actually does a good job.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


I should have said "how-to" guides, whether in books, magazines, or online. Magazines probably the worst culprits.

I have hard of two different ways to make sure you have the proper distance from the ball.

First is to let your right hand (assuming you're right handed) just dangle and if you're in the right position, it should just fall into the grip. The second is to address the ball and have the butt of the club at your left inner leg. Then you should take a half a step back. I always worked with the first one and it has been decent for me. On a side note, I have read some other reviews (not on this site) that say this book is geared more towards people who hit hooks rather than slices. Any truth to that?
Link to comment
Share on other sites


I got through the first chapter and a half. It is a little wordy. All good information. So far my grip was right on and my stance is OK, could improve posture a bit.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Even though I’ve played for many years, it was always on and off, maybe going out 3 or 4 times a year and generally struggling. Now that my kids are a bit older and I have a bit more disposable income to throw that this game, I decided to make a real effort this year to improve my game. In addition to a new set of irons, I also picked up a copy of Five Lessons. The new irons have been great, but the book has definitely done far more to improve my game so far.

For someone like me who has always struggled with golf, Hogan’s book helped in many ways. First, by simply focusing on the most fundamental aspects of the game, its helped me start down the path of building a good foundation. For years, I just tried to learn as I played, picking up tips from friends/family, etc… In hindsight, that was mostly a complete waste of time as I was all over the place. I learned more in the time it took me to read the 1st chapter of Five Lessons than I learned in all the years previously.

One area I particularly liked about this book is the general tone of it. Again, for the occasional player like me, golf can be a bit of a mystery. But, in Five Lessons, Hogan demystified golf for me. There is no “secret” to golf, no magic, silver-bullet. As Hogan clearly stated, any able-bodied person can be successful through study and hard work (practice). This may sound strange, but to me, that was a revelation. Thanks to Hogan’s book, golf was no longer intimidating to me. By reading this book and applying myself, I now know I can become a good golfer. It won’t happen overnight, but I can see the path forward.

Since I’ve read this book, I’ve seen a huge improvement in my game. I still have a long way to go, but I’m now hitting the ball with consistency and accuracy. I’ve also supplemented this book with Gary McCord’s Golf for Dummies and Tiger’s How I Play Golf. As I pick up new things from these two books, I go back to Five Lessons and evaluate what I’ve learned in the context of Five Lessons.

Next week, I’ll have my first professional lesson, a step I would never have taken had I not gained the confidence from Five Lessons. There’s more to the game that what Ben Hogan covered in this book, but for a beginner or hacker like me, I can’t think of a better foundation to start with than Five Lessons. Highly Recommended.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


My golf game took a quantum leap in improvement when I finally learned how to perform the correct footwork in my golf swing - footwork I learned from Ben Hogan's "Five Lessons". Believe it or not I read that chapter about proper footwork dozens of times before I finally "got it".

Hogan said your feet should feel "alive" during the golf swing. This does not mean the "happy feet" most amatuers seem to have, but an active-alive feeling in the feet.

My feet actually had too much movement in it causing my swing to be too loose with too many moving parts. When I quieted down my feet I began to realize the "alive" feeling Hogan was talking about.

The results?

My golf swing became much more powerful, compact, and consistent.

Hope this helps.

--John
Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • 3 weeks later...
That's a vital piece of info missed by so many books it's not even funny.

I'm very willing to say my problems finding the correct distance from the ball a few years ago, were my own self-generated problem, and nothing to do with any missing part of the book. It was probably more a matter of me needing to bring a lot of other things into a more repeatable and serviceable line first, so that I could then have a more predictable swingpath.

That said, I'm going over the book a second time, (now that I have replaced my inexplicably missing first copy) and re-kindling my love for the book. It really does need to be read — and played and practiced — slowly and attentively, as some paragraphs are very rich in detail that's easy to miss. It's a joy to read and the way he weaves in thoughts about the mental/psychological aspect is just as valuable as the technical information. When I started out my golf 'career,' fighting the slice was part of the battle. My pro has me doing things a certain way, so now, if anything, hooks and pushes are the main issues.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


I picked up this book last night and read through the grip portion before I went to bed and was amazed of how awful my grip was. I tried the overlap and it was never comfortable so i went back to the interlock not knowing I was doing it wrong. I followed it exactly in the book and I must say I love how it feels and have been practicing it since I read that chapter.

I couldn't sleep so i got up at the crack of dawn and read the next chapter on positioning and Stance and again I was nothing like the book stated so I practiced into my net and there is a lot of promise. I am going to hit up the driving range here soon and really take my time with the grip and setup.

So far it was the best 12 bucks I have spent on golf in awhile
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Well, there you go. Hogan's Five Fundamentals and Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged are my choices of most influencial books of the last century. Still waiting for candidates for this century.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Im new to golf and i just finished the little red book, now im reading this and i love it. i have been going to the range for fun since i was about 10 but never got a chance to get on the course. Now at 19 i have developed a love for golf and ill be going out for the first time soon. I think reading these books before ever even getting onto a course will benefit me a lot.
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Note: This thread is 1123 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • Support TST Affiliates

    TourStriker PlaneMate
    Golfer's Journal
    FlightScope Mevo
    Use the code "iacas" for 10% off Mevo after clicking this link. For Mevo+, click this link or the image above.
  • Posts

    • 1. So people who fail out, have to pay loans back, but if you graduate then your loan should be forgiven? I don’t see why banks would ever give loans out then. With that logic, I would think college would become less accessible not more accessible.    2. If you don’t think cost should be an issue, then are you willing to pay for others to go? Things cost money. That’s life, that’s reality. Someone will have to pay for it…are you willing to pay for others to go?  I have two kids I’d love for you to pay for.  I’m not willing to pay for others’ college education as it’s a privilege, not a right. I’ve already paid for my own.  Again, people should be responsible for themselves and stop acting as if they are entitled to everything regardless of their ability to pay for things.   And if you and others who want their education paid for and want to live in China under their form of government, go ahead. I’m not interested in that. 
    • I think it might be said that if you can succeed in college then you are entitled to loan forgiveness.  Do you want China and other countries far exceeding us in education?  The bottom line is that loans shouldn't be a factor.  We need to find a way for kids who have a drive to succeed in school get to go to school.  Advanced education, in certain areas, should be covered.  Doctors and lawyers and such...
    • It sounds like you’re arguing that some students would have to drop out is a reason to forgive the loan…as if college college is an entitled right…that everyone is entitled to college.  It’s not; it’s like a car: you might need it for a job or career, but you’re not entitled to a car. You can buy one if you can afford it.  With that line of logic, where do you draw the line?  If I can’t afford my house and I would otherwise need to be homeless, then is the bank supposed to forgive my loan?  I’m not entitled to anything I can’t afford. It’s called living within my means and being fiscally responsible.
    • A lot of students, if they didn't take out the loan, would have to drop out of college.  In the STEM areas we need those students in school.  So I'm not terrifically opposed to forgiving loans.  Also, it's a small boost to the economy, allowing those graduates to spend their discretionary income and feed the the consumer economy. I paid off all my student loans... took some time.  Now, I need to call a credit card company or two to see if they'll forgive my loans...
    • I’d agreed with this logic 100%. I paid off my loans. It’s called being responsible for your decisions. Simply enough, I think people should be held responsible and be accountable for the decisions they make. I think our society is becoming increasingly irresponsible or denying personal accountability as people want to make excuses as to why they shouldn’t be held accountable for their own choices.    Ignorance is no excuse. They made the decision. They should seek wise council before taking the loan out. Maybe they could learn from their mistakes instead of bailing everyone out and they learn nothing except that they won’t be held responsible for the decisions they make.   having said all of that, moving forward, I’d agree college unjustifiably expensive and reform would be welcomed
  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Augie
      Augie
      (63 years old)
    2. Dukes1304
      Dukes1304
      (36 years old)
    3. Mmgolfwiz
      Mmgolfwiz
      (58 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...