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arduous1

DSG on Cleveland wedges

10 posts in this topic

I know what it is, but whats the plusses and minuses to having it? Thx, Ard 1
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Originally Posted by arduous1

I know what it is, but whats the plusses and minuses to having it?

Thx,

Ard 1


I have a couple Cleveland 588 wedges with DSG. In theory, they're more versatile since they can be opened up to add more loft while keeping the leading edge flush with the ground. This is more difficult with more classic wide flanged Cleveland wedges.

I thought I'd really like the DSG soles because it's similar to the grinds on my old Mizuno Pro wedges, but I actually prefer the wided flanged Clevelands because they're a bit more effective out of long rough and bunkers. I do still really like the versatility of the Mizuno grinds though, so if I'm going to a new course, more often than not the Mizunos are in the bag. For courses where you need have a very reliable sand wedge for actual bunker play, I take the non-DSG Clevelands.

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Originally Posted by WUTiger

Club designer Ralph Maltby answers a question on this topic. He recommends against DSG wedges for most golfers, because they're very difficult to play:

http://www.ralphmaltby.com/search?query=%22DSG%22&search.x;=20&search.y;=13



That's an interesting link.  I did notice the non-DSG 588s (the Clevelands) require virtually no practice between rounds. In fact extra practice with them is a waste of time since there's nothing to master - dead easy right away, but more precise shots just aren't in their repetoire.

Basically the non-DSGs are a good early season wedge choice, then when I get my feel back, it's Mizuno time and maybe I'll cosider the DSG 588s again (but probably not).

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Sean_,

I play the CG14 wedges (similar to 588), and pretty much hit them square faced. I'll open up a couple of degrees for extra stop, or close a couple to get extra run, but that's about it. I do use quarter, half, and three-quarter swings, but don't try any unusual manipulations.

Basic wedge is easier for a mid-HDCPer like me to manage and keep grooved.

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I play the DSG cleveland wedges and I love them. They allow you to get a crisper contact with the ball and I find you can get more spin around the greens from tight lies. I don't find them anymore difficult to play then any other design of wedge. I have played the CG wedges a lot and I just prefer the playability of the DSG design. I would recommend getting fitted for a wedge or at least go and try out a few different design and see what you like.

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I play the DSG for my lob wedge, and love it. I use a 588 for my sand wedge, and it has a 12 bounce so its perfect for the soft bunkers. My DSG is a 60 degree, and the bounce is 08, but the DSG has much more bounce near the leading edge, so I can open the face of this club for delicate lobs and flops while using the 8 bounce, AND I can hit down more aggressively for knock-down spin shots as the increased leading-edge bounce keeps the club from digging and sticking too much in the ground. Its also works in bunkers too, but not needed since my 588 is spectacular for that.

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I am about a 10-13 handicap depending on how honest I'm being that day. :) I was hitting my 54* CH15 DSG well last fall but so far this season I am hitting right under it just about everytime. I went to a different wedge with a 12* bounce and have had no problems. I think a DSG is definitely a club you need to play once you've got your feel down.
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I am about a 10-13 handicap depending on how honest I'm being that day. :) I was hitting my 54* CH15 DSG well last fall but so far this season I am hitting right under it just about everytime. I went to a different wedge with a 12* bounce and have had no problems. I think a DSG is definitely a club you need to play once you've got your feel down.
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Quote:

... I think a DSG is definitely a club you need to play once you've got your feel down. ...


Agreed. I am supposed to have a wedge lesson soon, and I want some info on rated bounce vs. effective bounce. Both clubhead design and how you set up for a shot influence effective bounce.

For beginners out there, in year 2 you may want to have a lesson just on chipping and pitching. I had one several years ago, and it really paid off in performance.

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