carmo

HELP!!!! Got Rust spots on my new Mizuno Irons

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Played 3 rounds with my new Mizuno mp67 irons and i have just gone to clean them and to my horror at least 3-4 clubs have rust spots on the face

How can i get this off without damaging the club / Finish of club
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This is directly from the Mizuno website FAQ's :


My forged irons have rust showing up on the face of the club. Is this normal?
Yes, rust can happen. Forged heads are made of mild carbon steel that is chrome plated. Once you start hitting balls you scratch the surface of the chrome, which can eventually expose the raw steel to moisture, and chemicals that can cause rust to form. The best way to minimize rust is to keep the irons dry at all times, wipe them after every shot and at the end of the round with a dry cloth. When cleaning use only a NYLON brush (no metal) and dry them with a dry towel. If you get some rust forming, spray the surface with WD-40 and clean with a nylon brush or Scotchbrite pad and wipe them clean with a dry cloth. Some high nitrogen fertilizers, sandy soil conditions and water with high iron content can accelerate the production of rust. The use of iron head covers is not recommended as they trap moisture and accelerate the production of rust.

In addition to WD 40 you can also try gun cleaner... many new firearms have nickel / carbon steel slide and frames and a good gun cleaner (CLP) will clean it without damaging the finish etc.
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I had the same problem with my MP 60. I called the guys from Mizuno and they told me to use very fine Steel-Wool! I tried it on my PW and it works without damaging the rest of the chrome cover.

Another way is "Scotch Brite" Steel Cleanser but i only tried that once because i think it is a little bit to aggressive.

The best way to keep the rust spots away is to play a lot with your irons dry them well with a towel after the round and use (Sewing Machine/ Gun) Oil every now and then to keep the moisture away.
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think i am going to spray them with WD-40 then scrub them with a Nylon brush
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I have managed to sort it. I had a 2 sided brush i got from a golf pro shop i cleaned them with the Yellowey wire type brush end that is meant to clean grooves and it removed all the rust

cheers for help
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This is directly from the

I have managed to sort it. I had a 2 sided brush i got from a golf pro shop i cleaned them with the

You're going to want to play close attention to them now, you may have removed more of the chrome with that wire brush which could potentially increase your chances for even more rust to return. My suggestion would be to spray them down with WD-40 after each cleaning at least for a little while.

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hopefully it should be ok. It is one of those masters double sided brushes you get from pro shops. 1 end is a black nylon for cleaning drivers and the other end is like wired brush for cleaning grooves

I think it will be ok
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hopefully it should be ok. It is one of those masters double sided brushes you get from pro shops. 1 end is a black nylon for cleaning drivers and the other end is like wired brush for cleaning grooves

carmo,

Stick with the nylon bristle side. With irons made from carbon steel this is an unavoidable side effect of playing golf. There are certain things you can do to slow the process. Make sure you are using clean range balls. This is the biggest thing you can do. It's in your control, before you practice, take three balls at a time and wipe them down (if dirty). This will also slow you down and keep you from developing the "scrape and hit" mentality. If possible, avoid soil with extremely sandy substrate. This is nearly impossible to do at most driving ranges since this is the number one choice of backfilling. However, sandy substrates rapidly increase the wear process. Do not spray WD-40 on your clubs. I used to believe it is a rust inhibitor as well until a chemical engineer customer warned me that it is actually petroleum based and will speed the rusting process. If you're storing your clubs for a long period of time (such as winter break), buy electrician grade spray silicone (in the blue can), spray some on a cloth, and use that to wipe your clubheads down. It does a much better job than WD-40. I use it on my gun blue TP Mills putters and recommend all customers use it on their Cameron Circa series putters to prevent rust.
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I know this is well old - but just got hold of some secondhand MP 32 and the 3 iron had a few rust spots - one a little raised. So FWIW Cleaned it up with very fine steel wool soaked in vinegar (happened to be white wine vinegar but any should do) - lightish scrubbing removed spots and then thoroughly washed in soapy water and dried then applied a very light smear of machine oil. None of other surface seems effected - will have to see how it goes but will possibly reappear as the raised  spot was due to v small chip in face. 

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On 2/8/2007 at 3:37 AM, seppo said:

I had the same problem with my MP 60. I called the guys from Mizuno and they told me to use very fine Steel-Wool! I tried it on my PW and it works without damaging the rest of the chrome cover.

Another way is "Scotch Brite" Steel Cleanser but i only tried that once because i think it is a little bit to aggressive.

The best way to keep the rust spots away is to play a lot with your irons dry them well with a towel after the round and use (Sewing Machine/ Gun) Oil every now and then to keep the moisture away.

Isn't that oil coating going to affect the playing characteristics of the club?

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1 hour ago, natureboy said:

Isn't that oil coating going to affect the playing characteristics of the club?

Check the date on the post you quoted!  :-P

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It was I who resurrected this topic & should be castigated.

My theory is the oil will help protect the exposed metal in the tiny indent marks - it is a very light smear that should quickly dissapate from the rest of the face with a wipe with a towel. 

Edited by NDavis
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7 hours ago, NDavis said:

It was I who resurrected this topic & should be castigated.

My theory is the oil will help protect the exposed metal in the tiny indent marks - it is a very light smear that should quickly dissapate from the rest of the face with a wipe with a towel. 

Okay thanks for the update despite the date. I didn't see the towel wipe procedure explicit - so the idea is to get a thin film in any surface cracks / dings.

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Bar Keepers Friend.  Found in grocery stores among other places.  I use a champagne cork to apply it as I prefer the liquid version. 

I use this all the time for carbon knives that I restore and sharpen for people and it works wonders 

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Get the rust off as others have suggested.  Then get to you local gun store (or Wal-Mart) and pick up some CLP ( stands for Cleans, Lubricants, Protects.)   Some of the best rust preventing stuff available.  Google it.  Outperformed lots of other high end protection.

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I have the same double sided wire brush as stated above but I NEVER use the wire side (said to be used on irons) because it can cause damaged and take off the finish of the club, especially in a forged Mizuno iron. If you soak the head in water for a few seconds and use the nylon side it works just as good as the metal wire side. Also, cleaning and drying your clubs after every round and practice session will help keep your clubs in good shape. Take care of your clubs and they will take care of you ??

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