Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
jncasey

Good irons for weekend golfer

55 posts in this topic

Hello all,

My name is Jonathan and I am new to this forum. I have enjoyed recreational golfing for years and I'm tired of using my grandfather's Walter Hagen Ultradyne irons from the 1970's. Given that I am 22 years old, I am interested in purchasing a set of reliable clubs that will hopefully improve my game. With that said, I would appreciate any input as to what irons would be appropriate for a novice/amateur weekend golfer. I have not visited any golf stores yet for size/measurements or computer readings. After reviewing the latest equipment on golfer's digest, I am clueless as to what I would need.

Thanks in advance!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Want to get rid of this advertisement? Sign up (or log in) today! It's free!

Taylormade Burner 2.0, Callaway Razr, Ping G15, Cobra S3. These are all good and pretty cheap. They are all easy to hit and great beginner irons. For drivers, you want to get something relatively new because technology has changed so much. Taylormade Burner and Callaway Octane or Diablo are good and cheap as well. The driver is more important than irons, so i would spend a little more time getting fitted for the right driver but still take time on the irons. Try Rockbottomgolf.com, they have a great selection of cheap clubs.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You hit a driver MAYBE 10-12 times a round. How is that the most important club in your bag? 75%-85% of all shots are within 100 yards of the hole.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You hit a driver MAYBE 10-12 times a round. How is that the most important club in your bag? 75%-85% of all shots are within 100 yards of the hole.

Unless you're including putts, You're either playing awfully short courses or missing a lot of greens if 75% - 85% of your shots are within 100 yds of the hole.... The driver, and the putter are likely the 2 clubs that will account for the most individual strokes per round. I imagine that's what was meant. The iron set will account for a lot more strokes than the driver....especially since a new player might not even play a driver very often....and as such I'd absolutely give their selection the same attention as the driver and let's not forget that putter! Bottom line though. Get fit at a place where you can actually hit a variety of clubs and has some kind of playability guarantee that will allow you to return them for credit if you just can't hit them on the course. Good luck Jonathan....have fun!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I can't really recommend an iron set to you, because you need to be fitted or receive a professional recommendation based on data in regards to your swing type, swing speed, etc.


A lot goes in to choosing your new iron set, or at least it should . I know of way too many people that simply grab their Golf Galaxy flier from their mail box and just have to have the latest and greatest. I also know of many people that just "can't pass up a deal" and buy something that the never hit before.

I made that same mistake when I bought a set of Callaway X-20 Forged irons - worst mistake I ever made. To top it off, they had graphite shafts too... but I could not pass up the $300 price tag on them. They weren't a complete waste though as I gave them to my father-in-law and he loves them.

Anyway, I tried around 15 different iron sets before I finally settled on a set that isn't even "currently relevant". I play the Cobra S2 because I actually had better results with them than the Cobra S3. Just go to a pro-shop and try different things until you find something that suits you. Just don't be overly gullible when a sales rep tries to convince you that you need to spend $800-1000. Seek out a professional - even if the session costs some cash. It will be worth it in the end because the game will be more enjoyable when you have something that feels like it has been tailored to your game.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're right, I misspoke, it's about 65% withing 100yds. If the guy is a weekend warrior like most of us, he don't need the fitting. There are plenty of good sets of irons, drivers, woods, hybrids and putters out there that won't cost ya an arm and a leg.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An older set of Ping G-series irons would be great if you are on a tight budget.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend getting a quality set of last years or older model new clubs.  Right now one good deal I saw was the Callaway X-20's for about $300 brand new, cant go wrong with that.  Taylor Made's new RBZ line is obviously expensive, but you can get great deals on the TaylorMade Burner irons now.  Each manufacturer has its newest models out and of couse they are expensive, but that means you can get a deal on the previous model which alot of times are nearly identical in technology.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by LBlack14

You're right, I misspoke, it's about 65% withing 100yds. If the guy is a weekend warrior like most of us, he don't need the fitting. There are plenty of good sets of irons, drivers, woods, hybrids and putters out there that won't cost ya an arm and a leg.

I recommend a fitting because it only makes sense. Why would someone invest, potentially, $400-500 in golf clubs without spending an extra $75-100 to make sure that they will work for them and produce positive results?

That would be like walking into a car dealership and buying a car based on your buddies review, rather than test driving it for yourself.

Sure, by all means, you can walk in and pick up a set that you think looks cool or has rave reviews. In my opinion, if you're going to spend anything over $300 on a set that you intend to use for several years, you need to at least hit a launch monitor with a PGA certified individual at the very least... which can sometimes cost as low as $30-50.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can buy a whole, quality set for under $200 used. I ain't talkin' Walmart either. If he plays once a week and doesn't have a repeatable swing, how are you gonna get a true fitting. He could go to 3 different fitters and get 3 entirely different results and suck at all 3 set ups. I get tired of hearing the "Get fit" cry when for MOST it's a waste of time and money. Take it and spend it on greens fees or even lessons. No offense.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by LBlack14

I can buy a whole, quality set for under $200 used. I ain't talkin' Walmart either. If he plays once a week and doesn't have a repeatable swing, how are you gonna get a true fitting. He could go to 3 different fitters and get 3 entirely different results and suck at all 3 set ups. I get tired of hearing the "Get fit" cry when for MOST it's a waste of time and money. Take it and spend it on greens fees or even lessons. No offense.

I am not trying to "call you out" or debate with you. I am simply saying that if this individual is interested in purchasing a set of clubs that they intend on using for years to come and perhaps take golf seriously, then it would be well worth it to invest in a fitting, or even lesson, or both if you're venturing out there. If you read what the OP said here; " With that said, I would appreciate any input as to what irons would be appropriate for a novice/amateur weekend golfer. I have not visited any golf stores yet for size/measurements or computer readings. After reviewing the latest equipment on golfer's digest, I am clueless as to what I would need. ", you would see that it is clear that they may intend on seeking out a fitting by use of the word "yet". With his other comment, " after reviewing the latest equipment on golfer's digest, I am clueless as to what I would need ", I was led to believe that he is interested in purchasing something new. Even the new line-up that would be advertised by golfer's digest is going to be well over $200 even if the clubs are used. And if they are intent on spending the amount of money that I originally referenced, it would not make sense to skip the fitting and pull a set off of the wall. If you're buying something that will last, make sure it fits you.

My wife would never buy a pink shag rug for our living room just because it's cheaper, or on sale. She would buy what matched our home... "and I ain't talkin' K-Mart either".

Hopefully this clarifies where I was going, because I surely was not advocating the "Stop asking questions and go get a fitting" "cry" that you manifested.

Oh, no offense taken.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Callaway X-14s can be had for around $100 on eBay. Ping Eye 2's for $100-150. Both great sets and well worth whatever you pay.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jonathan, I am a titleist guy  I went from a set of Cobra irons to the original AP1's. This set cannot be more than $200 used on line or at a good golf club, a turn in set or even a demo set. They are very forgiving. You won't be able to work the ball or any of that fancy stuff but they are fun to play with. Just when you thought you have hit the worst shot of your life these clubs will guide that ball on a straight line not a  pretty shot  but the ball will get to where you want it to go. Good Luck!  Remember lessons are more important than the sticks at the beginning look for a good teaching pro.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Thanks for the quick advice everyone. I plan on going to a golf shop tomorrow to try out a few irons and drivers. I've been told that the Cobra AMP driver is a must.....
My brother-in-law called me this afternoon with a good offer. His friend is willing to sell for $500:

Ping G10 irons full set w/wedges
Ping G10 driver
Taylormade 2.0 3 wood + hybrid club
Odyssey putter
Ping golf bag

He said he might take less than $500. I need to find out if the irons would fit me. Does this sound like a good deal? Is there a significant difference between the G10's and 15's or even 20's? I could really use a set of game-improvement irons. While I would like to invest in a life-long set, it seems as if I might benefit better by purchasing a slightly used set and save $$$. With experience, I can advance to more challenging clubs (not sure how you would phrase that correctly).

I played 18 holes again today with the classic Walter Hagen irons and a Snake Eyes 320cc driver (made by my grandfather). I hit the irons excellent. If you miss; however, it will send a vibration that rattles from your feet to your face. My longest drive with the Snake Eyes was 265 yards. With all the new technological improvements in irons and especially drivers, I can't wait to take advantage of them. Anything at this point would be better than my 1970 irons.

Thanks,

Jonathan

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's not enough difference to tell from 1 G series iron to the next. That's 1 helluva deal if you ask me and I'd haggle anyway just for kicks.;-) Keep us posted on your personal findings and final decision. I know I'm curious.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally Posted by Spyder

I can't really recommend an iron set to you, because you need to be fitted or receive a professional recommendation based on data in regards to your swing type, swing speed, etc.

Honestly guys, I get sick of the "gotta get fitted" comments.     Sure this applies to the serious players among the ranks, but the average weekend golfer doesn't have the will or need to be fitted for clubs (assuming he is of average height) - especially if he's a developing player that doesn't take the game as serious as we do.      Fitting can help everybody no doubt, but it's not for everybody, particularly those less avid.   Fitting for a person without an established repeatable swing makes no sense.

To answer the OP ... you can get a complete set of game improvement clubs (irons, driver, hybrid, putter) with bag by Top Filte, Wilson, Ram, etc for $200 brand new on the web sites (rock Bottom Golf, Budget Golf, etc) or better yet eBay - this is a great way to start out & will serve you well UNTIL you get real serious about your game and need higher end equipment.     Example ... http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-WILSON-ULTRA-Mens-Right-Handed-Complete-Pkge-Golf-Club-Set-w-Bag-12-Balls-/390386916304?_trksid=p3284.m263&_trkparms=algo%3DSIC%26its%3DI%26itu%3DUCI%252BIA%252BUA%252BFICS%252BUFI%26otn%3D21%26pmod%3D140778858266%26ps%3D54

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you'll never get a better deal on a set of very high quality irons than this - truly an exceptional deal: http://www.golfsmith.com/product/30081642/wilson-staff-ci9-4-gw-iron-set-with-steel-shafts

These are better than the irons I play & paid alot more for.    Plus Wilson Staff have the best golf commercials EVER !!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xyIbhwPBL4c

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8xI-QAba_E&feature;=related

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • 2016 TST Partners

    GAME Golf
    PING Golf
    Lowest Score Wins
  • Popular Now

  • Posts

    • I haven't felt that way about golf yet.  However, I can relate as I had that same issue with tennis. I was a scholarship tennis player and tennis instructor.  I got so competitive that winning wasn't that much fun due to pressure and when I did lose a match it was awful.  It always felt like a high pressure job after I graduated high school. Then I discovered golf playing Tiger Woods video game.   This wonderful sport is only as competitive as you want to make it.  You can play higher pressure stroke play events and betting games with other players, or choose the low stress route of "playing against the course" and playing in scrambles only. No matter how low my handicap gets I will never play another stroke play event.  The last one I played in I shot 3 rounds in the low 80's and lost to a guy that couldn't break 90 due to his "handicap."  I said to hell with that...and I've stuck to scrambles and playing the course ever since.
    • The 3h seems like a waste of a slot (distance-wise).  If it was me, I'd ditch that one in favor of something that I could hit 205 to better fill the gap between the 3i and the driver, and get another wedge for around the green as well.
    • There are times where I feel like a bit of an oddity within the TST community, because I'm not actively working on making swing changes.  I do try to spend one short range session reinforcing basics like alignment and tempo and proper sequencing, but my course time is all about just playing.  For me, I enjoy the competition and the company of my friends, even when I play poorly.  Sure, I have more fun when I play well, but I never have a bad time at the golf course.  The biggest part of my enjoyment comes from time with my friends, good golf is just a sideshow.  Think of the time invested.  If you take 100 shots, and concentrate an entire 30 seconds on each one, that's still less than an hour.  3/4 of your time on the golf course, maybe more, is spent NOT hitting shots, enjoy that part of it. OK, I accept that you're going to continue playing as deep into the fall as you can, but you want to somehow improve your enjoyment.  What else can you change?  Can you play with different people?  Should you temporarily curtail your swing practice, and just play?  Can you somehow change your mental approach to take pressure to perform off?   It seems like you feel its your duty to continue playing, because the season will end before long, rather than playing because you look forward to it.  I have a duty to go to work, to earn my paycheck, but I play golf because I enjoy it.  To continue doing the same thing, and continue to not enjoy the time, seems pretty counterproductive to me.  So what if you take a couple of weeks off in the middle of golf season, that seems like a better choice to me than going out there and having a bad time.
    • Understood; bag makeup is all about personal preference, if something doesn't work for you there's no sense giving it a slot. I would still recommend trying out a third wedge, like a 54. Yes it's close, but that allows for a difference in bounce which is important for different lies, and also in sole grind which allows other options. You might, for instance, pick a 54 with a grind that allows you to open the clubface, allowing lob and flop shots similar to what you could do with a 60* or higher. Voila, 4 wedges (including PW) just effectively became 5, adding two more weapons to your greenside game. If you don't think playing the open flop shot is in the cards for you, consider a low- to mid-bounce 60*, again giving you additional approach options you don't have now. In this case it would be the ability to hit your normal full swing as close as 40-60 yards, and to pitch instead of chip from rough with a tight pin position. Remember that your wedges and your putter account for 2/3 of your strokes, so making the right shot up close is the best way to drop your score. The more options you have inside 80 yards that you are confident in, the better the outcome.
    • Agreed! I was just looking at the MP-4s, MP-5s and Titleist 716 MBs last night. Looking to make the transition into one of those sets after I get the chance to hit them all.
  • TST Blog Entries

  • Images

  • Today's Birthdays

    1. Jason141
      Jason141
      (27 years old)
    2. ngreed86
      ngreed86
      (30 years old)
  • Blog Entries