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sixonezero

Problems caused by interlock grip?

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sixonezero    0

I know there are a lot of threads on grip preference (interlock, overlap, 10 finger, etc.), but I was watching this video last night and the instructor suggests that an interlock grip leads to "problems".  He doesn't really expand on what those problems might be, and advocates for overlap or 10 finger.  Just curious what you guys more expertise than me think about this, and whether interlock is problematic.

For me, I've always used an interlock grip because it feels more secure, and I feel like I can use less grip pressure if I do.  But I'm having problems with driver contact, pulls, and slices right now, so I'm open to trying something new if my grip might be part of the problem.  What kinds of problems could an interlock grip cause?

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Audaxi    2

I used to use a reverse overlap grip (pointer finger on top of the pinkie) and currently use the interlocking grip. I find that my current grip is much more secure and comfortable, but I also have a tendency to leave the club almost completely shut at the top (the face points straight up). This might be just my strong grip though, but it did start after I switched.

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GaijinGolfer    84

The problem with the interlock grip is that both of your hands are equal and it makes it more likely for your dominant hand to take over, which wont allow you to make as solid of contact as if you made your dominant hand weaker, which is what the overlap/Varden grip does.

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Truegolf    0
I use interlocking and have no major issues I play a fade or cut shot most of the time Sometimes when I need to hook it I have use an 10 fingered grip If I have trouble turning the ball over that day

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cipher    390

I do not know that the teacher doing the video is really showing a neutral grip.  The left hand looks neutral but the the right hand at 5:31 looks pretty weak to me.  Looks like an anti hook grip maybe.  I have always used the interlocking grip, but lately seem to be having trouble with my hands feeling like they want to separate during the swing.  Inter-loose as I have heard it said.  I have been trying out the overlapping grip but it has not felt comfortable to me yet, and is harder to turn the club over.  I feel like my hands are more unified though and stable at the top.  The truth is that any of the three major grips can be successful, you just need to find what works best for you.

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HawkeyeDan    0

I guess I would tell that guy that 32 majors say otherwise...but in all seriousness, if he is using a strong left - weak right kind of grip, I could see how the interlock would make it pretty hard to get in that position.

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sixonezero    0
Originally Posted by cipher

I do not know that the teacher doing the video is really showing a neutral grip.

Yes that's right he's talking about neutral grip, but he interjects a couple comments about problems caused by interlock and never expands on it (I can't find where in the video it was).   As a side note, after watching this I tried out a neutral grip yesterday on the range (still interlocked) and it worked great.  I've always used a strong grip from the beginning because that's what I was always told about helping to correct a slice.  But like he says at the end of the video, a strong grip seems intended for beginners, and yesterday I was hitting it straighter than ever gripping neutral and it felt great.

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GaijinGolfer    84
Originally Posted by HawkeyeDan

I guess I would tell that guy that 32 majors say otherwise...but in all seriousness, if he is using a strong left - weak right kind of grip, I could see how the interlock would make it pretty hard to get in that position.


And he could come back and tell you that biomechanics says otherwise too.  Just because Tiger and Jack used the interlock doesnt mean its the best for everyone.  Jack used the interlock because he has small hands and Tiger uses the interlock because thats what Jack used and he idolized Jack when he was growing up.  So, Tiger's use of the interlock really has no logical sense and was born out of mere hero worship of Jack.

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saevel25    1,073

Grips vary between all players. The key is that pro's have grips that match there swing. Dustin Johnson uses a stronger grip, Jim Furyk uses a weaker grip, and everyone else ranges between there. So his idea that all the good pro's use a neutral grip is a bunch of BS.

What people need to do is use ONE grip for a while, see were there misses are, if there hitting hooks (NOT PULL HOOKS), pull hooks are a swing path issue. But golf balls starting right and over turning way to much left, then you might have a to strong a grip. If your grip is already weak and your hitting it further left, then your probably coming from to far from the inside.

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boogielicious    1,159

I think it has more to do with your hands than anything else.  I've tried the Vardon grip and it does not feel comfortable or give me a more secure fit.  I have long thin fingers. saevel25 has a good approach.

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HawkeyeDan    0
Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer

And he could come back and tell you that biomechanics says otherwise too.  Just because Tiger and Jack used the interlock doesnt mean its the best for everyone.  Jack used the interlock because he has small hands and Tiger uses the interlock because thats what Jack used and he idolized Jack when he was growing up.  So, Tiger's use of the interlock really has no logical sense and was born out of mere hero worship of Jack.

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Truegolf    0
I find that when I'm strong strong I tend to put slice spin When I'm weak weak I can put drawspin When my left hand is weak and right hand strong I tend to push fade When my left hand is strong and right hand is weak I tend to pull hook

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wadesworld    15

The interlock can be a source of problems.  I historically have had issues with the side of my pinkie nail digging into my skin.  It's not a problem for one round, but can become painful if I'm trying to play 36.  I should probably change to the Varden to eliminate it, but just haven't gotten around to putting the time into making the switch.

I also jammed the heck out of my pinkie during a bad shot off a matt one day.  I think if I would let it rest long enough it would heal, but I can't bear to give up a chance to play golf.  So, it bothers me a bit as well.

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GaijinGolfer    84
Originally Posted by HawkeyeDan


Well, yeah, thats pretty much exactly what I said.  The interlock worked for Jack because he has small hands, so for him it helped to have his right hand be a bit stronger in his swing.  That doesnt mean its the way for everyone though.

When a lot of people say why they use the interlock, they like to trot of the excuse that Jack and Tiger use it, so it must be the best grip or because they feel that it locks their hands together better, which in some ways it does.  However, the problem with this isnt so much that you want to lock your hands together as much as you want to make your dominant hand weaker so that it doesnt take over your swing and so that you hit the ball with more of a backhand type of hit.

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HawkeyeDan    0
Originally Posted by GaijinGolfer

Well, yeah, thats pretty much exactly what I said.  The interlock worked for Jack because he has small hands, so for him it helped to have his right hand be a bit stronger in his swing.  That doesnt mean its the way for everyone though.

When a lot of people say why they use the interlock, they like to trot of the excuse that Jack and Tiger use it, so it must be the best grip or because they feel that it locks their hands together better, which in some ways it does.  However, the problem with this isnt so much that you want to lock your hands together as much as you want to make your dominant hand weaker so that it doesnt take over your swing and so that you hit the ball with more of a backhand type of hit.



Sorry if I misunderstood your post, and we are basically in agreement whereby I don't think anyone should do something because of a pro - their reason should be I do it because it works for me.  I was more trying to argue with the person in the video - he basically said in essence to stay away from an interlock and then provided no real reason for a pretty broad-brush statement.

You have an interesting take on the purpose of the grip to somewhat weaken your dominant hand.  By that logic I'd assume you recommend that I use a reverse overlap grip for full swings - I am a lefty who is left side dominant in about every way except I golf right handed.  I have always been told or read that the purpose is to unify the hands in some way so they work together.  Can you elaborate on this idea?  Thanks!

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Tom Shanks    3
Just today I've realized that the interlock IS causing me a lot of problems. For whatever reason, I physically cannot match the strenght of my right hand to my left(righty). The right hand is always much weaker. Sure I can fiddle around with it for awhile and get them to match, but when I do it feels uncomfortable. This has been causing me to hit a lot of pushes, feeling a little uncomfortable at the top, and having trouble turning the club over(because my hand is already turned over!) Changed to an overlap today and my hand fell into place almost too easily. Everything lined up perfect, got a draw with less effort, and increased my lag a tad. Guess I'm just not built for the interlock. Anyone else discover issues like this?

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mmoan2    24

I've also heard that the interlock grip often causes folks to bury the club too far into the palm of your dominant hand. That can be a problem. I started with an interlock grip because I figured if it was good enough for Tiger and Jack... but a pro suggested I switch to Vardon about 3 months after I started playing. Now I feel that an interlock does cause the club to naturally fall into my palm more.

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I use an interlock grip and am having problems with my right hand wanting to pull away from my left hand at the top of my backswing.  My right hand pinkie pulls my left hand pointer away from left hand middle finger creating a gap and exposing the grip.  Anyone else ever expierence this problem?  I have a stronger grip, 3 knuckels on my left hand and no knuckles on my right(besides thumb).

Could this be caused by my right wrist cocking more then my left?

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