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Tailgater

Gun Collection Talk

17 posts in this topic

I am not a collector. But I own four guns. I own: 9 mm pistol .380 pistol 12 gauge .410 shotgun (from my late father) I want to buy a revolver. What shout I get?

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What would you be using it for?

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What would you be using it for?

This ^^^^^^^, plinking vs home defense, or hunting may warrant different revolvers, especially caliber.

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I have a S&W; model 66 357 magnum (4 inch barrel). It is an outstanding revolver.

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This ^^^^^^^, plinking vs home defense, or hunting may warrant different revolvers, especially caliber.

Honestly, just to own one and target shoot from time to time. It would not be weapon for home defense, which is my 12 gauge. For road trips, I take my 9 mm for protection.

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Honestly, just to own one and target shoot from time to time. It would not be weapon for home defense, which is my 12 gauge. For road trips, I take my 9 mm for protection.

For target practice and plinking, I would look at a 22lr. But I would go with an automatic not a revolver. But Taurus makes an excellent revolver if thats what you are set on.

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You really have to think what type of shooting will I be doing with this next purchase.  If you think it could be defense, then a Smith and Wesson 357 can not be beat, you can shoot 38 wad cutter target rounds which are very reasonable cost wise and then use JHP magnum loads for defense.  Any of the Smith wheel guns are excellent, I carried a number of them during my 40 years as a police officer and relied on them several times to save my life and they all did the job.  If you have no problems with price I'd buy one from Smiths Custom Shop.  If you just want a cheap to shoot but quality firearm then a Smith 22 would be the pick.  Don't let anyone talk you into the large bore guns, 41 and 44's are tough to control and most difficult to shoot accurately, There were times when I left the range with bleeding hands after as little as 100 rounds from my 44, plus cost of ammo for these monsters is out of site.

I'm kind of weird in my old age, I keep a 15 shot 40 by my bed, just due to the number of rounds, but when I go out on the street at night I'm packing my Kimber 45 it's a little big and only holds 8 rounds but I hit where I aim and nothing can stand up to the punch of that big 45 hollow point.

RON

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Just being nosey but why the 12 gage for home defense?  If this is the case what loads or types of rounds are you using and how many rounds does your scatter gun hold, pump or auto

RON

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Just being nosey but why the 12 gage for home defense?  If this is the case what loads or types of rounds are you using and how many rounds does your scatter gun hold, pump or auto

RON

For home defense, the shotgun is probably the best choice.  Can't miss....

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A lot of people believe that, remember your not going to get any spread pattern for at least 20 yards, so unless your front room is 60 feet across the group of shot will still be the same size as the barrel.  Using  long weapon in the dark in confined space requires years of practice and shooting skills, you can't use the shotgun one handed like if you had to use your cell phone.  In addition unless it is equip with a light you have to think about that too.  The kind of load is important also, bird or hunting loads can be defeated by just normal street clothes such as a couple of shirts and a leather jacket. Defense loads such as 00 and 0 buck shot have limited spread again and loose their ability to penetrate quickly.  The heavy hitter or rifled slug is brutal to shoot and can not only endanger your family if you miss but your neighbors as well as they go through many layers of sheet rock.  At 40 or 50 yards a shot gun is the best, especially if it has a laser sight and a search light.  If someone is hell bent on doing you or your family harm, hiding in the house and grabbing the weapon is a very likely scenario, not to mention getting off an accurate second shot with a pump shot gun again is a skill that takes years to perfect.

You said you trust your 9mm for when your on the road, if its good enough there its good enough at home.  Look into a laser sight with a search light included, that laser sight really builds the confidence fast when shooting in low light, plus you can keep that pistol in close to control the weapon in case a bad guy wants to use it.  If you really want to do some plinking, look up IDPA  International Defensive Pistol Association in your area. Everyone in the group will be just like you and they will be some of the best people you will ever meet.  They hold monthly shoots were real life scenarios are set up.  They will walk you through each stage and give you pointers, some will be very good shooters others just starting but no one looks down on anyone. I assure you that it will be one of the best times of your life meeting new friends and picking up some new skills at the same time.  Didn't mean to preach but so many years teaching police to shoot pops out of me still

RON

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A lot of people believe that, remember your not going to get any spread pattern for at least 20 yards, so unless your front room is 60 feet across the group of shot will still be the same size as the barrel.  Using  long weapon in the dark in confined space requires years of practice and shooting skills, you can't use the shotgun one handed like if you had to use your cell phone.  In addition unless it is equip with a light you have to think about that too.  The kind of load is important also, bird or hunting loads can be defeated by just normal street clothes such as a couple of shirts and a leather jacket. Defense loads such as 00 and 0 buck shot have limited spread again and loose their ability to penetrate quickly.  The heavy hitter or rifled slug is brutal to shoot and can not only endanger your family if you miss but your neighbors as well as they go through many layers of sheet rock.  At 40 or 50 yards a shot gun is the best, especially if it has a laser sight and a search light.  If someone is hell bent on doing you or your family harm, hiding in the house and grabbing the weapon is a very likely scenario, not to mention getting off an accurate second shot with a pump shot gun again is a skill that takes years to perfect.

You said you trust your 9mm for when your on the road, if its good enough there its good enough at home.  Look into a laser sight with a search light included, that laser sight really builds the confidence fast when shooting in low light, plus you can keep that pistol in close to control the weapon in case a bad guy wants to use it.  If you really want to do some plinking, look up IDPA  International Defensive Pistol Association in your area. Everyone in the group will be just like you and they will be some of the best people you will ever meet.  They hold monthly shoots were real life scenarios are set up.  They will walk you through each stage and give you pointers, some will be very good shooters others just starting but no one looks down on anyone. I assure you that it will be one of the best times of your life meeting new friends and picking up some new skills at the same time.  Didn't mean to preach but so many years teaching police to shoot pops out of me still

RON


Good reasons why the shotgun may not be the best choice.

I actually think it is a good choice because it's plenty lethal within a room but less likely to injure neighbors.

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We live out in the the country/desert, in a very small community. Since we are 30 miles from the nearest police, we all watch out for one another, but you never know. I own a .30 cal carbine, 9mm single action ruger, and a black , desert eagle 44 magnum. The carbine in our home protector because the clips hold 30 rounds. Of course before the guns come into play, we have two 125 lb dogs who like to chew on anything they disagree with.

Personally I like your idea of the shot gun.

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A lot of people believe that, remember your not going to get any spread pattern for at least 20 yards, so unless your front room is 60 feet across the group of shot will still be the same size as the barrel.  Using  long weapon in the dark in confined space requires years of practice and shooting skills, you can't use the shotgun one handed like if you had to use your cell phone.  In addition unless it is equip with a light you have to think about that too.  The kind of load is important also, bird or hunting loads can be defeated by just normal street clothes such as a couple of shirts and a leather jacket. Defense loads such as 00 and 0 buck shot have limited spread again and loose their ability to penetrate quickly.  The heavy hitter or rifled slug is brutal to shoot and can not only endanger your family if you miss but your neighbors as well as they go through many layers of sheet rock.  At 40 or 50 yards a shot gun is the best, especially if it has a laser sight and a search light.  If someone is hell bent on doing you or your family harm, hiding in the house and grabbing the weapon is a very likely scenario, not to mention getting off an accurate second shot with a pump shot gun again is a skill that takes years to perfect.

You said you trust your 9mm for when your on the road, if its good enough there its good enough at home.  Look into a laser sight with a search light included, that laser sight really builds the confidence fast when shooting in low light, plus you can keep that pistol in close to control the weapon in case a bad guy wants to use it.  If you really want to do some plinking, look up IDPA  International Defensive Pistol Association in your area. Everyone in the group will be just like you and they will be some of the best people you will ever meet.  They hold monthly shoots were real life scenarios are set up.  They will walk you through each stage and give you pointers, some will be very good shooters others just starting but no one looks down on anyone. I assure you that it will be one of the best times of your life meeting new friends and picking up some new skills at the same time.  Didn't mean to preach but so many years teaching police to shoot pops out of me still

RON

Great advice right there...And totally agree that a laser with a light is really good to have for home defense, have em on my 1911.

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ALLLLLLL RIGHT, way to go, couldn't have thought up a better defense if I tried.  When things go bump in the night my go to gun is a mini 14, with two 30 rounders taped together, the laser sights and search light tucked up under the barrel makes me sleep at night.  I back that gun up with a Glock 22 and three defense trained Great Danes one comes in at just over 190 lbs.  I'm guessing who ever comes into the house if they can get by them, I'll have plenty of time to set up a little something extra for them.

THEHOOK840

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Just being nosey but why the 12 gage for home defense?  If this is the case what loads or types of rounds are you using and how many rounds does your scatter gun hold, pump or auto RON

I asked a several people with more knowledge than me and to a man they all said a 12 gauge shotty. I have a Maverick88 by Mossberg. It holds 6+1. I have buck shot for home defense. It is a pump. I hope that just racking that bad boy would scare off any intruder.

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Tailgater, there are several different revolvers out there that would be nice...

Colt Python... not made anymore and to some, prohibitively expensive. Possibly some of the smoothest clockwork action you could ever run into. Nice versions (not worn out and rusted up) can run upwards of $1,500.

Smith and Wesson... earlier versions are nice... you can tell the version by the model number... say a S&W; 686-4 would be the 4th revision of the venerable 686 model. If you're wanting one without the S&W; keylock then you'll want an earlier version. The keylock is sometimes referred to as the "lawyer lock" because S&W; installed those to make lawyers happy. They don't affect the function of the revolver but S&W; purists don't like them. Because of this, the prices of earlier versions are a little high.

Ruger... GP100, GP101, Security-Six... 3 fine revolvers from Ruger. Reliable as the day is long, fairly affordable, accurate.

Don't forget Dan Wesson... interchangable barrels give different lengths for different things.

Charter Arms... makes revolvers and they're pretty good from what I hear.

In my experience, I've only fired S&W; 586 (.357 magnum) 686 (357 magnum), Ruger Super Redhawk (.44 magnum) and Ruger New Model Blackhawk (.357 magnum).

There are also the Colt Detective Special, Colt Trooper Special, and several other offerings by Colt and Smith and Wesson.

If you get a revolver in .357 magnum, you can fire .38 special out of them with no modification and milder recoil and lower cost for ammunition. Same thing goes for 44 magnum... you can fire 44 special through them for lower ammo cost and milder recoil.

If you get a 38 special revolver, don't try to fire 357 magnum out of it... it shouldn't fit for one and the 38 special can't withstand the pressure of the 357 magnum cartridge if you're able to get one in the chamber to fire. (bad idea)

If you get a 2" snub nosed revolver, expect fairly harsh recoil from a 38 special (should you choose that caliber) and punishing recoil if you get one in 357 magnum.

Revolvers come in several different calibers and different barrel lengths. 3"-4" should provide good accuracy. A barrel with an underlug (like the Smith and Wesson model 686) provides additional weight under the barrel and helps tame recoil somewhat.

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