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TST Member Review - Birdicorn ball mark (divot) repair tool.

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Product Name: Birdicorn ball mark (divot) repair tool.
Product Type: Divot repair tool/ball marker
Product Website/URL: https://birdicorn.com
Cost: $20

Ratings (out of 5):
Quality: 5
Value: 4
Effectiveness: 5
Durability: 5
Esthetic Appeal: 5


My Member Review

I received the birdicorn tool and marker today while on my way to play a round of golf so decided to put it to the test. 

The Birdicorn tool appeared well made of anodized aluminum. It was well finished on all areas and edges were all uniformly smooth. 

The Birdicorn marker was also well made. The image etched into the marker was clean and well defined. The paint fill was well done also. 

Birdicorn marker was very effective at repairing ball marks. The portion of bottle opener helped with the ball mark repair as well. The Birdicorn seemed to be faster than my usual ball mark repair tool at repairing marks. It was also a rainy day and I used the Birdicorn to rest clubs on, which it also excelled in. The putting line drawing assist was also sufficient. Bottle opener was tested and worked as expected. My initial  concern was that the magnets in the tool to hold the marker might not be sufficient to keep the ball marker attached to the tool but after forcefully testing the tool, the marker did hold on to the tool. 

The Birdicorn is a very nice and well made tool and excels in what it was designed to do. It has a price listed on the website as $25 but on sale for $20. As well made as this tool is, I would find it a little pricey for ball mark repair tool, personally.  Now if you need all the features available in one tool, the price may not be an issue and you can't go wrong with the Birdicorn tool. 

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