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Changing driver shafts - is a fitting necessary?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have a TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 driver with a regular-flex shaft and after changing my irons to a stiff shaft due to my swing speed, the driver is now too "whippy" and I'm beating the ball into the ground. I went to Golf Galaxy today (GG and Dick's are my only options) and looked at their stiff, low kick-point driver shafts since I want to get more loft and spin on my drives. The rep said that they would have to schedule me for a driver fitting ($29.99) and find the shaft for me thereafter. My question is is this really necessary? I was looking at shafts and the one I picked out based on what I was looking to do (UST Mamiya 65) looked like a good fit. I'm only a "twice a month" player so is it really necessary to go through and pay for the fitting? Thanks.

post #2 of 12

I won't say that it is absolutely necessary but it's probably a good idea. If you just buy one off the shelf, it's just going to be a crapshoot whether or not it'll work for you, so you're taking a $100 gamble that you'll get the results you're looking for. Spending the money on the fitting will help you ensure you get the shaft that will give you the results you want. On top of that, most retailers will put the cost of the fitting (or at least a portion of it) towards your purchase if you make one.

post #3 of 12

If i had the dough to afford top of the line golf gear, all the advertised club fittings, the fancy clothing, super comfy spiked shoes, lessons weekly and weekends at Bandon Dunes and Whistling Hills, you would find me on the cover of Forbes magazine.  But my game may not be improved any.

I have swapped numerous shafts of various flex on woods and irons.  One hour on the range puts me right in sync with the new club. Fitting necessary?  Not for me. When i get to HC 12, i might consider but till then i am too inconsistent. 

post #4 of 12

For me, a driver fitting was a game changer.

 

If you do not want to spend the $30 - do a search for Taylormade fittings near you - the fitting will be free.

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by meenman View Post
 

For me, a driver fitting was a game changer.

 

If you do not want to spend the $30 - do a search for Taylormade fittings near you - the fitting will be free.

I've noticed that your cap has dropped substantially since getting fit for that new driver and 3 wood. Nice work!

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'll have to call and see if Golf Galaxy will roll the cost of the fitting and installation into the purchase price of the shaft. Thanks.

post #7 of 12

If you only play a couple times a month, it may be better to get a lesson focusing on how to hit the driver, and you'll have it for the rest of your life. If anything your instructor should be able to change your ball flight more than any equipment tweak. I hit my 8.5˚ X stiff driver much higher and farther than I ever hit my first driver, a 10.5˚ regular. It's because of my angle of attack and my having a better swing, but I don't discount how nicely the better equipment feels and performs. 

 

If you pay for the fitting, the reshaft job, and the replacement shaft, it may be that they won't have a major impact. If you're hitting the ball low then more loft and a different shaft should help your average result to be a bit better. Certainly in my case, a stiffer set of shafts helped me a bit but it wasn't until much later that I got better. A fitting will give you some good information and it could make an immediate difference once you're used to it; and you may be able to use the launch monitor data to learn more about your swing. You can always use the great resources on this site to try and get the most out of your new setup.

 

It's your choice, but just keep in mind the fitting and lesson are in the same ballpark cost and time wise in many cases.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

Who knows, I might even end up trading the thing in for a different club. I was thinking of taking a stiff-shafted driver off of the pre-owned rack and seeing what it felt like compared to the regular shaft as well. Is having stiff irons and a regular driver that big of a deal? Or is it just in my head?

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by DReynolds86 View Post
 

Who knows, I might even end up trading the thing in for a different club. I was thinking of taking a stiff-shafted driver off of the pre-owned rack and seeing what it felt like compared to the regular shaft as well. Is having stiff irons and a regular driver that big of a deal? Or is it just in my head?

I don't think it's that big a deal, I play X stiff in everything but when I hit demos or other people's clubs that have stiff or regular, I can still put a decent swing on the ball. I played a stiff in my driver, 3w, and hybrid for a while when I had X stiff irons and hit them well enough. But my setup does feel better to me and helps me control the ball a bit better. Personally I didn't get fitted on a monitor, but my results are pretty good and I picked shafts that play about the same in terms of flex because I have the same needs across the whole set. Usually a player who mixes flex in their set might have a softer wedge or 3w shaft to change their flight a bit or add spin, but it's not unheard of to mix whatever feels good to you.

 

If you can find a used driver you like better, even if you just like how it sets up to the ball, it could help if you actually dislike your current one. Certainly try out some different flexes and weights, and see if it makes a difference for you. I wouldn't expect a drastic change (though some people respond well) and I still say technique is especially important for the driver either way. Don't go in expecting to buy anything at first but just get a sense of what you like.

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

When I bought the Stage 2, I also hit a Callaway, a Nike VR-S and a TaylorMade SuperFast 2.0. The Stage 2 was the one I hit the best. Maybe I'll just take it to the range tomorrow and try to work some kinks out before dropping money on a new shaft or a new driver.

post #11 of 12

Don't depend on what the shaft is labeled to mean a whole lot. An "S Flex" from one company may be nothing like an "S Flex" from another company and even from the same company they won't be completely identical. Then there are higher and lower kick points that can also be different.

 

A guy at the course today had a club that was an "S". Mine is an "S". It was obvious they weren't even close to the same and if I hadn't looked I would have thought his was an "R Flex".

post #12 of 12

If I were you I would sell your current driver on ebay and either look into a new one or swing some used ones at Golf Galaxy. Find one that has a shaft you like the feel of and a head you like the look of, and pull the trigger. 

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